Suggestion: This post talks about the difference between being thin and being anorexic, about how we should reevaluate what “healthy” body image means. Saying “Thin & Proud” may ruffle feathers, even if all women should be proud of their figures. I would focus on examples of how the press/media/culture is confusing anorexia with natural thinness, and reflect that in the post title.
Suggestion: This post is both descriptive and vague. It tells me I will be accessing secret information about “racing fashion” but I don't know what “racing fashion” is right off the bat. A quick Google search informed me of two things… Racing Fashion is what you wear to horse races, and that it's not what my middle-class family wears to go bet on the horses.  I'm so embarrassed.
Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).

no pl (= manner) → Art (und Weise) f; (in the) Indian fashion → auf Indianerart, nach Art der Indianer; in the usual fashion → wie üblich; in a similar fashion → auf ähnliche Weise; to behave in a strange fashion → sich merkwürdig verhalten; did it work/have you translated it? — after a fashion → hat es geklappt/hast du es übersetzt? — so einigermaßen; to do something after or in a fashion → etw recht und schlecht machen; I can cook after a fashion → ich kann so einigermaßen kochen; a novel after or in the fashion of D.H. Lawrence → ein Roman im Stil von D. H. Lawrence; in this fashion → auf diese Weise, so
In the 16th century, national differences were at their most pronounced. Ten 16th century portraits of German or Italian gentlemen may show ten entirely different hats. Albrecht Dürer illustrated the differences in his actual (or composite) contrast of Nuremberg and Venetian fashions at the close of the 15th century (illustration, right). The "Spanish style" of the late 16th century began the move back to synchronicity among upper-class Europeans, and after a struggle in the mid-17th century, French styles decisively took over leadership, a process completed in the 18th century.[19]
With increasing environmental awareness, the economic imperative to "Spend now, think later" is getting increasingly scrutinized.[43] Today's consumer tends to be more mindful about consumption, looking for just enough and better, more durable options. People have also become more conscious of the impact their everyday consumption has on the environment and society, and these initiatives are often described as a move towards sustainable fashion, yet critics argue a circular economy based on growth is an oxymoron, or an increasing spiral of consumption, rather than a utopian cradle-to-cradle circular solution.
Although tailors and dressmakers were no doubt responsible for many innovations, and the textile industry certainly led many trends, the history of fashion design is normally understood to date from 1858 when the English-born Charles Frederick Worth opened the first true haute couture house in Paris. These fashion houses have to adhere to standards such as keeping at least twenty employees engaged in making the clothes, showing two collections per year at fashion shows, and presenting a certain number of patterns to costumers.[23] Since then, the idea of the fashion designer as a celebrity in his or her own right has become increasingly dominant.[24]
Runway show is a reflection of fashion trend and a designer's thought. For designer like Vivienne Westwood, runway shows are a platform for her voice on politics and current events. For her AW15 menswear show, according to Water,[42] "where models with severely bruised faces channeled eco-warriors on a mission to save the planet." Another recent example is a staged feminist protest march for Chanel's SS15 show, rioting models chanting words of empowerment with signs like "Feminist but feminine" and "Ladies first." According to Water,[42] "The show tapped into Chanel's long history of championing female independence: founder Coco Chanel was a trailblazer for liberating the female body in the post-WWI era, introducing silhouettes that countered the restrictive corsets then in favour."
I just entered this whole blogging world and your website is saving my life – well, that’s a bit extreme. But yes. My life is being saved. There are so many clear, witty explanations of how and why I need to do particular things that I *could* spend all day simply pouring over the info you provide. But I won’t. Because you taught me that I was avoiding actually creating content. I am now in the process of figuring out how to do a good logo and the last comment I read addressed that very problem. Fantastic! Now I’m off to purchase and figure out Aweber. Ta!

(in clothing: = latest style) → Mode f; (back) in fashion → (wieder) modern; it’s the/all the fashion → es ist Mode/große Mode; to come into/go out of fashion → in Mode/aus der Mode kommen; a man of fashion → ein modischer Herr; the Paris fashions → die Pariser Mode; she always wears the latest fashions → sie ist immer nach der neuesten Mode gekleidet; fashions in women’s clothes → die Damenmode; to set a fashion → eine Mode aufbringen; the fashion world → die Welt der Mode
SYNONYMY NOTE: fashion is the prevailing custom in dress, manners, speech, etc. of a particular place or time, esp. as established by the dominant section of society or the leaders in the fields of art, literature, etc.; , style, often a close synonym for , fashion, in discriminating use suggests a distinctive fashion, esp. the way of dressing, living, etc. that distinguishes persons with money and taste; , mode, the French word expressing this idea, suggests the height of fashion in dress, behavior, etc. at any particular time; , vogue stresses the general acceptance or great popularity of a certain fashion; , fad stresses the impulsive enthusiasm with which a fashion is taken up for a short time; , rage, craze both stress an intense, sometimes irrational enthusiasm for a passing fashion
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