Make sure your beauty blog name is clear to spell: I have seen many blog names that just make it impossible to pronounce them loud. Or if called out loud it will cause a confusion.For example, my own blog name is DigitalGYD.com which I chose because the name I wanted (DigitalGuide.com) was already taken. Now I regret because this name neither suits my now content and is hard for people to understand when called out loud (often misunderstood with DigitalGuide or Digital Geed). *FacePalm*
This was GREAT content and really helpful. I had already instinctually gone towards a few of the set up things, and the good content idea. Thank you for validating that long posts with good content are good things- I have had many people coach me in the opposite direction. My posts have a lot of content and are long, so I’m glad to hear that I’m not breaking every rule in the book. Thanks for the networking ideas, I had not seen these before.
Today, people in rich countries are linked to people in poor countries through the commoditization and consumption of what is called fashion. People work long hours in one area of the globe to produce things that people in another part of the globe are anxious to consume. An example of this is the chain of production and consumption of Nike shoes, which are produced in Taiwan and then purchased in North America. At the production end, there is nation-building a hard working ideology that leads people to produce and entices people to consume with a vast amount of goods for the offering[clarification needed]. Commodities are no longer just utilitarian but are fashionable, be they running shoes or sweat suits.[65]
In eastern Indonesia, both the production and use of traditional textiles have been transformed as the production, use and value associated with textiles have changed due to modernization. In the past, women produced the textiles either for home consumption or to trade with others. Today, this has changed as most textiles are not being produced at home. Western goods are considered modern and are valued more than traditional goods, including the sarong, which retain a lingering association with colonialism. Now, sarongs are used only for rituals and ceremonial occasions, whereas western clothes are worn to church or government offices. Civil servants working in urban areas are more likely than peasants to make the distinction between western and traditional clothes. Following Indonesia's independence from the Dutch, people increasingly started buying factory made shirts and sarongs. In textile-producing areas the growing of cotton and production of naturally colored thread became obsolete. Traditional motifs on textiles are no longer considered the property of a certain social class or age group. Wives of government officials are promoting the use of traditional textiles in the form of western garments such as skirts, vests and blouses. This trend is also being followed by the general populace, and whoever can afford to hire a tailor is doing so to stitch traditional ikat textiles into western clothes. Thus, traditional textiles are now fashion goods and are no longer confined to the black, white and brown colour palette but come in array of colours. Traditional textiles are also being used in interior decorations and to make handbags, wallets and other accessories, which are considered fashionable by civil servants and their families. There is also a booming tourist trade in the eastern Indonesian city of Kupang where international as well as domestic tourists are eager to purchase traditionally printed western goods.[67]
As a blogger, I know how hard it is to come up with blog posts ideas everyday. I aim to write at least 1 blog post a day because I like to have my blog posts scheduled and I like to stay ‘switched on’. I struggle to get back into the swing of things when I take time off, so I try not to stay away for too long. I decided to write-up this post, sharing 30 blog post ideas for the month of June, and I hope someone finds these ideas useful.
Moreover, political movement built an impressive relationship with fashion trend. For instance, during Vietnam war, the youth of America made a movement that affected the whole country. In the 1960s, the fashion trend was full of fluorescent colors, prints patterns, bell-bottom jeans, fringed vests, and skirt became a protest outfit of the 1960s. This trend was called Hippie and it is still affecting current fashion trend.[34]
Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…

June 5, 2016 By fashionandstylepolice in Blogging Tips, Fashion Tags: 30 Blog Post Ideas for Fashion Blogs, Children's Style, Fashion, Fashion and Style Police, Fashion Blog Post Ideas, Fashion Blog UK, Fashion Blogger UK, Fashion Designers, Fashion News, Fashion trends, Fashionistas, High Street Fashion, High Street Shops, Moodboards, Outfit Photography Tips, Red Carpet Fashion, Red Carpet Style, street style, Style, Uk Bloggers, Wardrobe essentials, Who Wore It Better, Wishlist 59 Comments


Suggestions: There appeared to be only one line about Michelle Obama in the post. I felt the post title was a bit misleading, because it suggested it was more J. Crew and Michelle Obama, not J. Crew and the blogger. While the post title is great, a misleading post title can turn off new readers. I would suggest personalizing this post title, “How Michelle Obama turned me onto J. Crew”

The best fashion blogs don't just give you incredible style advice—they give you inspiration. Fashion blogs engage you in interesting content and provide new ideas on the subject of fashion and the surrounding creative world. Sure, everyone wants great outfit ideas for their saved Instagram section and dream wardrobes, but fashion isn't just about looking perfect. It can be an expression of who you are and how you want to represent yourself in the world. Now, if that's a little too deep for you, fear not. Our roundup of the best fashion blogs is a mix of serious and lighthearted takes on style.
Why: Hailing from Sao Paulo, Helena Bordon is one of Brazil’s most influential style bloggers. She started her fashion education from a young age courtesy of her mother, Donata Meirelles, the style director of Vogue Brazil. When Helena was just 7 years old, she’d join her mum at all the top fashion shows and eventually interned at Valentino. Now, Helena is co-founder of Brazilian high street fashion chain 284, as well as finding the time to run her eponymous blog, helenabordon.com, which offers Helena’s insider style, travel and beauty tips. Disclaimer: expect holiday envy.

Wow, Ramsay, thank you again. This is massive! I always have my domain for 5 years and I just parked it. And because I have always pushed back on making it big, I never really paid for webhosting. It has always been with blogspot (I know!) Reading this makes me realize I had 5 years trying to find my voice as a blogger, 5 years of finding that voice and 5 years of, well, maybe wasting my time when I could’ve done a lot better. So thank you, this is like a wake up call.


Why: While Lesego doesn’t have a blog per se, she does have a very active Instagram full of gorgeous photography and thoughtful captions (she occasionally dabbles in vlogging too). Be it the latest fashion trends, amazing lingerie or even those tricky to style narrow sunglasses, she’s a deft hand at styling and out to destroy any preconceptions of what a curvy girl can and can’t wear.
Anthropology, the study of culture and human societies, studies fashion by asking why certain styles are deemed socially appropriate and others are not. A certain way is chosen and that becomes the fashion as defined by a certain people as a whole, so if a particular style has a meaning in an already occurring set of beliefs that style will become fashion.[62] According to Ted Polhemus and Lynn Procter, fashion can be described as adornment, of which there are two types: fashion and anti-fashion. Through the capitalization and commoditisation of clothing, accessories, and shoes, etc., what once constituted anti-fashion becomes part of fashion as the lines between fashion and anti-fashion are blurred.[63]
The fashion industry is seeing how 3D printing technology has influenced designers such as Iris Van Herpen and Kimberly Ovitz. These designers have been heavily experimenting and developing 3D printed couture pieces. As the technology grows, the 3D printers will become more accessible to designers and eventually consumers, which could potentially shape the fashion industry entirely.
Fashion trends are influenced by several factors including cinema, celebrities, climate, creative explorations, political, economical, social and technological. Examining these factors is called a PEST analysis. Fashion forecasters can use this information to help determine growth or decline of a particular trend. Fashion trends change daily, it can not stay unchanged
Susie Lau's Style Bubble has been going for over a decade and includes intelligent articles on everything from underground global fashion talent to perfume. She also provides fascinating behind-the-scenes pieces on the real work it takes to create a beautiful Chanel garment. Then there's the tongue-in-cheek Man Repeller run by Leandra Medine and her team. Its smart, witty take on fashion is refreshing. And if over-the-top clothes aren't your thing, we've also found plenty of bloggers with more pared-back styles for the minimalists. 
With increasing environmental awareness, the economic imperative to "Spend now, think later" is getting increasingly scrutinized.[43] Today's consumer tends to be more mindful about consumption, looking for just enough and better, more durable options. People have also become more conscious of the impact their everyday consumption has on the environment and society, and these initiatives are often described as a move towards sustainable fashion, yet critics argue a circular economy based on growth is an oxymoron, or an increasing spiral of consumption, rather than a utopian cradle-to-cradle circular solution.
Early Western travelers, traveling whether to India, Persia, Turkey or China, would frequently remark on the absence of change in fashion in those countries. The Japanese shōgun's secretary bragged (not completely accurately) to a Spanish visitor in 1609 that Japanese clothing had not changed in over a thousand years.[6] However, there is considerable evidence in Ming China of rapidly changing fashions in Chinese clothing.[7] Changes in costume often took place at times of economic or social change, as occurred in ancient Rome and the medieval Caliphate, followed by a long period without major changes. In 8th-century Moorish Spain, the musician Ziryab introduced to Córdoba[8][unreliable source][9] sophisticated clothing-styles based on seasonal and daily fashions from his native Baghdad, modified by his own inspiration. Similar changes in fashion occurred in the 11th century in the Middle East following the arrival of the Turks, who introduced clothing styles from Central Asia and the Far East.[10]
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