Runway show is a reflection of fashion trend and a designer's thought. For designer like Vivienne Westwood, runway shows are a platform for her voice on politics and current events. For her AW15 menswear show, according to Water,[42] "where models with severely bruised faces channeled eco-warriors on a mission to save the planet." Another recent example is a staged feminist protest march for Chanel's SS15 show, rioting models chanting words of empowerment with signs like "Feminist but feminine" and "Ladies first." According to Water,[42] "The show tapped into Chanel's long history of championing female independence: founder Coco Chanel was a trailblazer for liberating the female body in the post-WWI era, introducing silhouettes that countered the restrictive corsets then in favour."
This site is a go-to for fashion-forward women who are shopping on a budget. Not only is the site dedicated to recreating celebrity looks with cheaper options (that look very similar, if not identical!), but it also is a source for style tips and the latest trends. See an outfit you love on Chrissy Teigen? Just hop over to the site to find out how to have it without spending three months worth of paychecks.
Though there had been distribution of dressed dolls from France since the 16th century and Abraham Bosse had produced engravings of fashion in the 1620s, the pace of change picked up in the 1780s with increased publication of French engravings illustrating the latest Paris styles. By 1800, all Western Europeans were dressing alike (or thought they were); local variation became first a sign of provincial culture and later a badge of the conservative peasant.[22]

Why: Of Turkish/Iranian Jewish descent, Medine kicked off her career with a blog called Boogers + Bagels. Her ironic fashion-addict asides soon had her readers rolling in the aisles, and she decided to focus on the topic full-time after a joky conversation while out shopping with a friend about how ‘man-repelling’ all the fashion-forward outfits they loved were. It’s now a male-scaring empire, providing in-depth intel: ‘The difference between Mom Jeans and Dad Jeans’, the fabulous ‘Manstagram’ – all the best fash items du jour – and fun features and style news aplenty.
I just entered this whole blogging world and your website is saving my life – well, that’s a bit extreme. But yes. My life is being saved. There are so many clear, witty explanations of how and why I need to do particular things that I *could* spend all day simply pouring over the info you provide. But I won’t. Because you taught me that I was avoiding actually creating content. I am now in the process of figuring out how to do a good logo and the last comment I read addressed that very problem. Fantastic! Now I’m off to purchase and figure out Aweber. Ta!
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The best fashion blogs don't just give you incredible style advice—they give you inspiration. Fashion blogs engage you in interesting content and provide new ideas on the subject of fashion and the surrounding creative world. Sure, everyone wants great outfit ideas for their saved Instagram section and dream wardrobes, but fashion isn't just about looking perfect. It can be an expression of who you are and how you want to represent yourself in the world. Now, if that's a little too deep for you, fear not. Our roundup of the best fashion blogs is a mix of serious and lighthearted takes on style.

Why: Hailing from Sao Paulo, Helena Bordon is one of Brazil’s most influential style bloggers. She started her fashion education from a young age courtesy of her mother, Donata Meirelles, the style director of Vogue Brazil. When Helena was just 7 years old, she’d join her mum at all the top fashion shows and eventually interned at Valentino. Now, Helena is co-founder of Brazilian high street fashion chain 284, as well as finding the time to run her eponymous blog, helenabordon.com, which offers Helena’s insider style, travel and beauty tips. Disclaimer: expect holiday envy.
Susie Lau's Style Bubble has been going for over a decade and includes intelligent articles on everything from underground global fashion talent to perfume. She also provides fascinating behind-the-scenes pieces on the real work it takes to create a beautiful Chanel garment. Then there's the tongue-in-cheek Man Repeller run by Leandra Medine and her team. Its smart, witty take on fashion is refreshing. And if over-the-top clothes aren't your thing, we've also found plenty of bloggers with more pared-back styles for the minimalists. 
You hit up your friends for help. For example, when I did a site redesign a few year ago, I asked for help with the overall color and feel. I told them I’d do the work, I just needed their opinion. My friend helped me perfect the site’s color scheme and the feel of the layout. Also told me stuff like “that image needs to be sharper…don’t resize, save in the right format, etc.”

Military technology has played an important role in the fashion industry. The camouflage pattern in clothing was developed to help military personnel be less visible to enemy forces. A trend emerged in the 1960s and camouflage fabric was introduced to street wear. The camouflage fabric trend disappeared and resurfaced several times since then. Camouflage started to appear in high fashion by the 1990s.[39] Designers such as Valentino, Dior and Dolce & Gabbana combined camouflage into their runway and ready-to-wear collections.

Though different textile colors and patterns changed from year to year,[20] the cut of a gentleman's coat and the length of his waistcoat, or the pattern to which a lady's dress was cut, changed more slowly. Men's fashions were largely derived from military models, and changes in a European male silhouette were galvanized in theaters of European war where gentleman officers had opportunities to make notes of foreign styles such as the "Steinkirk" cravat or necktie.
The best way to understand the consumers' needs and therefore predict fashion trends is through market research. There are two research methods: primary and secondary.[48] Secondary methods are taking other information that has already been collected, for example using a book or an article for research. Primary research is collecting data through surveys, interviews, observation, and/or focus groups.
A report from New York Fashion (Spring 2015) week found that while 79.69% of models on the runway were white, only 9.75% of models were black, 7.67% were Asian, and 2.12% were Latina. The lack of diversity also accounts for not only designers but models too, out of four hundred and seventy members of The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) only twelve of the members are black.[90] From the same study on New York Fashion Week, it was shown that only 2.7% of the 260 designers presented were black men, and an even smaller percentage were black female designers.[90] Even the relationship between independent designers and retailers can show the racial gap, only 1% of designers stocked at department stores being people of color. It was also found that in editorial spreads, over eighty percent of models pictured were white and only nine percent were black models. These numbers have stayed stagnant over the past few years.[90]
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Even though they are often used together, the term fashion differs from clothes and costume, where the first describes the material and technical garment, whereas the second has been relegated to special senses like fancy-dress or masquerade wear. Fashion instead describes the social and temporal system that "activates" dress as a social signifier in a certain time and context. Philosopher Georgio Agamben connects fashion to the current intensity of the qualitative moment, to the temporal aspect the Greek called kairos, whereas clothes belong to the quantitative, to what the Greek called chronos.[4]
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