In the past two years I have designed four dress collections (Time flies!). Each time I’ve shared a collection here we have received tons of requests for a how-to post about fashion sketching. I am self-taught (and still learning!), but I thought it would be fun to share a little bit about my process. I hope that some of you feel inspired to pull out your pens and pencils and notebooks today. Fashion sketching isn’t nearly as intimidating as I once thought it would be.
Mood board is the summary of your design collections. Put everything together like fabric, trims and also express emotions and mood on your mood board in a way that’s not just beautiful but fascinating. Remember that, your mood board is a selling tool for your ideas, so make it exciting! Mainly it’s a design tool that will help you to stay focused and consistent as your line develops. Generally it is prepare for the communication purposes and explaining your vision to others like retailers, media etc.. It is also use for creating a range or a collection.
This is where fashion illustration may collide a bit with editorial illustration. Perhaps you’d like to illustrate the figure walking down a runway or through a busy city. Allowing a simple background into your work may help viewers understand the context for where or when a design is worn. Please note, however, that if a background is busy, it may overwhelm the fashion design itself.
Range planning includes the creation of the ratio of garments to be selected in any given collection. For example, a basic range plan may be formed of four skirts, three trousers, six tops, two jackets and two dresses in three colour ways. Every collection needs a breakdown of units (garments) to enable the looks to be worn with enough combinations. If more volume sales come from tops it makes knowledge to supply more of these when editing the collection.
Klein received his education at the renowned Fashion Institute of Technology in NYC. His Calvin Klein underwear line, as well as his array of successful perfumes, helped him to build his empire. His ability to choose the sexiest, hippest stars for his ad campaigns also revealed his tremendous savvy and perceptiveness: celebs such as musician/actor Mark Wahlberg and supermodel Kate Moss also benefited from his uncanny ability to read the zeitgeist.
These boys Abu-Jani and Sandeep Khosla, as a duo are legendary in the fashion-circuit and earned success, hype, fame and attention. They were the first and the foremost to exhibit their work at Harrods, the UK luxury store. Though they lack in pro training, yet their designs are exclusive, distinctive and remarkable. All the time, they travel to the distant and remote areas in quest of the hidden-styles that are yet to be exposed. This creative coalition exudes talent and attitude!

The girl next door. The classic style that’s been around for ages. This fashion style doesn’t pay attention to the latest trends and doesn’t involve anything wild or exotic. This trend focuses on simplicity and cuteness, with a striped tee, shorts, and tennis shoes enough to make her happy. At the end of the day, she just wants to be adorable and casual!
3. Focus on developing a style of your own. There are a lot of things that determine the unique style of your illustrations. Do you want to use watercolors, markers or colored pencils? How will you illustrate the faces on your models? How much styling will you include? All of these little details will work together to create a look that is distinctly yours! Focus on creating sketches that express your unique aesthetic with each element.Resources I recommend: When I first started learning to sketch, my pal Mallory let me borrow Figure Drawing for Fashion Design. It was super helpful for learning the basics. I also highly recommend The Fashion Sketchpad (pictured above). It is a notebook with 420 figure templates to sketch on. I have been using it for a few years and absolutely love it for quick sketching and traveling!
Intelligent and pragmatic, Chanel used her powers of seduction to gain a foothold in the competitive fashion world; in succession, she became the mistress of two powerful and wealthy men. Both of her lovers were quite happy to use their money and influence to give her a start in business. From a beginning as a milliner, she rose to prominence in 1920, when her signature fragrance, the incredibly iconic Chanel No. 5, was launched.
Valentino started his brilliant and admirable career in the world of fashion in 1950 when he moved to Paris to study design. His classically elegant and feminine designs made women look utterly glamorous. The Italian maestro worked at houses Dessus and Laroche before going back to Rome to set up his business in 1959. By the mid-1960s, Valentino was a favorite designer of the world’s best-dressed women, including Jacqueline Kennedy. Among his signatures is a particular fabric shade, known as “Valentino red.”
Carol Marie is an awesome New York-based jewelry line designed by industry vets and close friends Heather White and Jennifer Kramer. Their vintage-inspired statement jewelry launched for fall 2010 and has already been picked up by Henri Bendel, Shopbop, Revolve, Free People, Endless and several other smaller boutiques and websites. Both designers still work in the fashion industry--Heather in PR and Jen in editorial--but have managed to grow a successful jewelry line on their off-hours. The young designers have proven that it is possible to have success in the middle of a recession by making smart decisions and really cute jewelry. Despite juggling multiple jobs, Heather and Jen took some time to answer our questions. Click through to find out how they're making it.
In my opinion, one of the most fun parts of fashion illustration is when an artist can show the weight and texture of a fabric within their drawing or painting. Whether they’ve taken the time to render corduroy or are skilled at showing the fabric’s weight through movement, I, as a viewer and artist, love to revel in these sorts of details. Instantly I understand the garment I’m seeing, and it’s far more tangible than everything being worn or shown looking the same.
Automation (6) CAD (2) Calculation (1) Career (6) Clothing (11) Color (2) Color Fastness (1) Computer (4) Consumption (10) Costing (7) Cutting (5) Cutting Machine (3) Defects (13) Denim (9) Dyeing (12) Dyes and Chemicals (2) ERP (3) Fabric (2) Fashion (8) Fashion Accessories (11) Fashion Design (9) Fashion Industry (5) Fashion Merchandising (2) Fashion Trends (2) Fiber (8) Finishing Machine (3) Garment Accessories (9) Garment Finishing (14) Garment Industry (19) Garment Wash (8) Garments Production (22) GSM (2) IE (26) Inspection (9) Knitting (8) Knitting Machine (4) Loom (2) Marker (3) Mercerizing (1) Merchandising (15) Needle (1) Pattern (8) Planning (12) Pretreatment (5) Printing (10) Printing Machine (1) Quality Control (19) Sample (3) Seamless Garment (1) Sewing (12) Sewing Machine (6) Sewing Thread (2) Smart Textiles (1) Special Garments (1) Spinning (3) Tailoring (1) Technical Textile (7) Testing Machine (2) Textile Book (1) Textile Design (2) Textile Finishing (3) Textile Industry (8) Textile Recycling (1) Textile Testing (4) Top 10 (10) Undergarment (3) Visual Merchandising (6) Weaving (2) Wool (2) Yarn (9) Yarn Count (4)
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Born in August of 1883, Gabrielle Chanel was a French native who was destined to liberate women from the constraints of corsets and other uncomfortable garments. A true rebel and visionary, Chanel, who changed her name to Coco after a brief career as a singer, preferred to wear clothes she could move freely in; often, her style were imbued with a mannish aesthetic. Indeed, Coco Chanel, who designed her first cardigan to avoid pulling any garment over her head, was really the originator of modern women’s sportswear. Her desire for freedom and self-expression gave women style without sacrifice…
Ottavio Missoni started their own fashion design company with his wife Rosita. First they started with stripes, the easiest design which could be made with the ch. They use up to twenty different fabrics, including wool, cotton, linen, rayon and silk and some 40 different colours for each of their collections. Their clothes range from sweaters to skirts, dresses and jackets. Ottavio Missoni has also diversified from clothes to tapestries and carpets. Ottavio died last year leaving Rosita being the head of the business.
Inspiration board is a references and research framework for your design. Designer collects different inspirational images, words, and objects (fabric, colour, textures,trims, paint chips, packaging, etc.) that are organize and keep at hand as a reference for starting a fashion design. It can be made in the form of a paper poster, a bulletin board, a digital graphic, or a video. 

Giorgio Armani was born on July 11, in 1934, in Italy. Armani is an iconic and unique fashion designer. His popularity skyrocketed in America in the 1980s with his men’s ‘power suits’. Armani attracted an enviable fashion following in the 80s with the unstructured jackets and soft trousers in mineral hues. With more than three decades in the business, Armani has enjoyed a longevity as a designer experienced by few others.
This is where fashion illustration may collide a bit with editorial illustration. Perhaps you’d like to illustrate the figure walking down a runway or through a busy city. Allowing a simple background into your work may help viewers understand the context for where or when a design is worn. Please note, however, that if a background is busy, it may overwhelm the fashion design itself.
Most established illustrators have agents. Rodgers is represented by Digital Brand Architects, and Morrison is represented in Australia and Asia by Perrott of The Illustration Room. They are more responsible for prioritizing work and negotiating contracts than finding new jobs. Both Morrison and Rodgers say nearly all of their work comes through word of mouth and social media. “[Having an agent] helps a lot in terms of contracts and there’s legal terms that I don’t understand, but I don’t think you have to have it,” says Morrison. “I think it is better to have it once you’ve established yourself and you’ve grown a little bit on your own.”

A mother-of-four, Downie clearly has a knack for “accidental” success having initially touched upon the fashion scene via a short stint making jewellery at her kitchen table which was selling at hip Covent Garden store Koh Samui in the late Nineties - before “one day I was cooking fishfinger sandwiches and [Net-A-Porter.com founder] Natalie Massenet calls up to ask if she can buy some for this new online thing she was doing”. Whether professionally trained or not, she’s keen that fashion illustrators are worthy of being called artists regardless of their status in relation to photographers. Certainly her own work is now bought by collectors all over the world at prices akin to fine art, regardless of what her subjects are depicted wearing. Citing the work of her Gucci collaborator Ignaci, as well as that of Kelly Brennan and Jill Button, “it crosses the line of design and fine art”, she says. “Whatever that umbrella term can be called. It shouldn’t be relegated to just fashion illustration.”
In the Seventies, Halston befriended (and dressed) members of the international jet set, including Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli, and Liz Taylor. Dressed in his trademark black turtleneck, he could often be found partying at Studio 54 and enjoying his success with a host of celebrity friends. Licensing deals made him very wealthy, but tragedy lay in the distance…drug addiction and an AIDS diagnosis in 1988 led to his downfall. Unable to cope with the demands of his career, he was fired from his own company…Halston died of AIDS-related complications in 1990.
Check for instructions or guidance on what to include. If you’re applying to a design program, they should give a good idea of what they want to see in your portfolio. If you’re designing a professional portfolio, you may not have explicit directions. Generally, you should include creative investigation, drawings that show your ability to translate 3D into 2D, color studies, and, if relevant, photos of 3D work that you’ve done.[1]
Make sure that these works incorporate a range of different types of styles or approaches to fabric and materials. You shouldn’t include more than two pieces from one style or approach. For example, maybe you have two pieces that showcase your ability to work with leather. You should also include one to two pieces that show off your ability to work with a different material, like silk or jersey. This will illustrate that you are able to work with several different materials and in several different styles.
If there is one thing that is constant, it is “change”. And change is exactly the one thing that is constant when it comes to fashion. Since the beginning of human civilization, there has been a constant effort being put to make one look better. The different styles in fashion have always gone through innumerable changes. With the increase in the amount of innovations, the change in trend and fashion styles have also been rapid. So keeping that in mind, here is the list of a few fashion styles that we accepted with all our hearts:
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