A little trick i do for when i sketch clothes is not giving a lot of matter over the long of the girl in the sketch, actually a lot of designers draw really (REALLY) long women, mostly because it helps visualize their designs and also cause models are freaky tall …. but it help me with clothes :3 to focus on style, instead of focusing over anatomy. (draw long and short girls! it doesnt matter)
Experience and a growing social media following can drive up fees over time, which means some illustrators earn thousands of dollars for a single drawing. Walton says her fees have gone "from a few hundred to a few thousand" per job. Another full-time illustrator we spoke with says she is making "four or five times" what she had previously been making at a large corporate design company.
A designer with a notorious past, Christian Dior was also known for being in cahoots with the enemy during WWII, when he dressed Nazi wives and French collaborators in his designs. Despite this questionable choice, he still rose to prominence during the late-forties when the war was over…primarily due to his unparalleled mastery of line and shape. He gave women a desirable “flower silhouette” which always featured a nipped-in waist, a full, voluminous skirt, and a feminine, corseted bodice. Often, the hips of his suits and dresses were padded to balance the bust line and accentuate the wasp-waisted effect.
3. Focus on developing a style of your own. There are a lot of things that determine the unique style of your illustrations. Do you want to use watercolors, markers or colored pencils? How will you illustrate the faces on your models? How much styling will you include? All of these little details will work together to create a look that is distinctly yours! Focus on creating sketches that express your unique aesthetic with each element.Resources I recommend: When I first started learning to sketch, my pal Mallory let me borrow Figure Drawing for Fashion Design. It was super helpful for learning the basics. I also highly recommend The Fashion Sketchpad (pictured above). It is a notebook with 420 figure templates to sketch on. I have been using it for a few years and absolutely love it for quick sketching and traveling!
Gather materials. Choose a hard lead pencil (H pencils are best) that makes light, sketchy marks that are easy to erase. Marks made with these pencils also don't indent the paper, which is helpful when you want to add color to the image. A good quality eraser and thick paper are also important materials to have if you want your sketch to look professional.
Born in August of 1883, Gabrielle Chanel was a French native who was destined to liberate women from the constraints of corsets and other uncomfortable garments. A true rebel and visionary, Chanel, who changed her name to Coco after a brief career as a singer, preferred to wear clothes she could move freely in; often, her style were imbued with a mannish aesthetic. Indeed, Coco Chanel, who designed her first cardigan to avoid pulling any garment over her head, was really the originator of modern women’s sportswear. Her desire for freedom and self-expression gave women style without sacrifice…
Consider, for accessory-only pieces, what sort of information you’d like the viewer to understand without seeing an associated figure. For instance, if you’re only drawing shoes and a handbag, coordinating the two based on material or design may tell a story of a well put together person. Or a pair of sneakers and a backpack would tell the story of a student or young person.
Basically for the ones who do not want to be dressed like a woman. They do not abide by the usual norms of what a woman should wear. To put it lightly, they prefer black over pink. Most of their clothing are a bit baggy and focuses more on graphic T-Shirts and Shirts from the boy’s selection. They do not prefer light colors and frills or laces. It can ask so be described as simple and modern. A boyish look is what they prefer over the classy, elegant looks.
“We love the body of a woman. Coco Chanel was wrong when she said that men were unable to design for women. Women know too much about women and they transpose their needs onto women’s clothes” The idea of women power and women shapes is as good to Dolce and Gabbana as it is for us. In 1985, their first collection was shown in Milan and built their themes on screen sirens, Sicilian widows and a rosary of Catholic kitsch. Dolce and Gabbana are arguably the most powerful and influential designers of our time.
As a rule, world’s famous fashion designers have their place in the fashion industry for a long time. Each of them has a luxury fashion house with their admirers, as well as characteristic iconic images, seen in all collections. Coco Chanel with her tweed suit or Valentino with his striking red dresses, the best fashion designers clothing are credited only those who created his own distinctive style, which entered the history of fashion. Here 10 people awarded with the title of “best.”

Son of Russian working class immigrants, Ralph Lauren has transformed himself into the sophisticated billionaire. His classic and preppy designs all draw upon an image of old world wealth and luxury, and he pioneered the concept of clothes as part of a lifestyle environment. Lauren worked in retail before developing a line of neckties. The brand he established, Polo, is now one part of an empire that includes fragrances, home furnishings and luxury clothing. Today, his five billion dollar business includes several clothing lines as well as perfumes, house ware, furniture and paint.

Calvin Klein studied fashion in New York and apprenticed for a suit manufacturer. In 1968, he opened his own company that was initially recognized for suits and coats, but his sportswear line became popular and top of the line. He received three Coty Awards for womenswear. His business now includes clothing, cosmetics, fragrances and home collections.
Unit 3.1: The mirroring technique: parts 1 & 2. Now it’s time to start designing your garment flat. On a croquis (AKA flat mannequin) template, you’ll begin with the neckline, and work your way down to the shoulders, the torso, and finally the shirtsleeves. Mickaela will make this design on just one half of the body, before copying and flipping it onto the other. This tactic will ensure that her design remains perfectly symmetrical.
It was through Instagram that Walton landed her first commission — paying $500 (a pretty low fee if you’re an established illustrator), which she couldn’t believe. “It was like, oh my god, they want to give me $500 for something I do in my free time?” Later on, she got an email from the creative director of InStyle, Rina Stone. It turned out an editor had shown Stone Walton’s Instagram, and Walton ended up creating artwork for an 18-page spread in the magazine. “If you have a skill and you just try and put it out there, it’s amazing how you could really reach anybody now.”
Gather magazine clippings, images, bits of fabric, natural materials, or anything else that is relevant to your page. Sort through them to decide which items are essential and which items are optional. Take a few pieces of sturdy paper and play around with different arrangements. Once you have settled on an arrangement, glue or tape the pieces to the paper or papers to create a collage page. Note that it's probably best to do single-sided pages, so that you can move them around freely if necessary.
In the 80’s, Ralph Lauren really became a force to be reckoned with, as his signature polo shirts for men, with their ubiquitous polo pony and rider, became coveted items for many different demographics. Available in every color of the rainbow, they lined his coffers and allowed him to put more money into his glamorous women’s wear lines; he especially enjoyed producing couture pieces and overseeing glossy runway shows.
Check for instructions or guidance on what to include. If you’re applying to a design program, they should give a good idea of what they want to see in your portfolio. If you’re designing a professional portfolio, you may not have explicit directions. Generally, you should include creative investigation, drawings that show your ability to translate 3D into 2D, color studies, and, if relevant, photos of 3D work that you’ve done.[1]
While as a medium it has been sidelined as old fashioned in comparison to the cutting edge that photography presented - made all the more thrilling by a Bailey-esque reputation for rebellion - in those days fashion illustration led the fashion press, inspiring new attitudes and breathing new life into past ones. In doing so it created a visual timeline of life since Vogue began. It never completely disappeared, but recently it has come back to explosive effect. Perhaps our first Vogue under editor Edward Enninful was such a marker in the sand of the new that it has generated a naturally concurrent upsurge in nostalgia; or perhaps, as technology erupts around us, we yearn for the quiet of a considered illustration, alive with the possibility of the artist's internal thoughts as much as with the potential of our own interpretation.
Valentino started his brilliant and admirable career in the world of fashion in 1950 when he moved to Paris to study design. His classically elegant and feminine designs made women look utterly glamorous. The Italian maestro worked at houses Dessus and Laroche before going back to Rome to set up his business in 1959. By the mid-1960s, Valentino was a favorite designer of the world’s best-dressed women, including Jacqueline Kennedy. Among his signatures is a particular fabric shade, known as “Valentino red.”
Undoubtedly it's harder to project our own identity onto a famous supermodel draped across a staircase, or align one’s own reality with the digitally enhanced, perceived perfection of a fashion shoot. An illustration is more translatable - it allows for a different daydream. And in a world where reality is often all too stark, and fashion can be somewhat daunting, it's not surprising that our artistic tastes are erring on the side of a little escapism.
Consider, for accessory-only pieces, what sort of information you’d like the viewer to understand without seeing an associated figure. For instance, if you’re only drawing shoes and a handbag, coordinating the two based on material or design may tell a story of a well put together person. Or a pair of sneakers and a backpack would tell the story of a student or young person.
“Fashion illustration can’t be retouched and there is certainly an appeal in that,” says Brett Croft, head of the Vogue House archive. “There is definitely a younger generation of illustrator coming through,” he adds. “It’s to do with Edward of course, but it’s also part of a movement towards more simple artforms which was very obvious at Frieze this year. Last year was all about video and this year there seemed to be a reaction away from that. I think there is an appeal in the fact it can’t be hyper real. It just is what it is - there’s a simplicity to it that is refreshing.”
Donatella started to work for her brother Gianni in the late 1970s, serving as his muse and adviser. Then she became the designer for the company’s Versus line in the 1980s. After her brother was murdered, in 1997, she became creative director of the Versace Group. Donatella made sure that Versace shops would be on different fashion centers around the world, particularly Milan and New York. Top celebrities like Jennifer Lopez and Madonna have endorsed the company’s collection of clothes, accessories, fragrances and home furnishings.
When you do stylize your figure, after having learned basic anatomy, you’ll want to do so in order to bring more focus to a particular element of design. For instance, fashion figures are often long-legged and much taller than the average human. In average human proportions, a figure is six to seven heads tall, whereas a fashion figure is eight or even nine heads tall, with most of that additional length being taken up in the legs. This is often used to bring the viewer’s attention to the length of a dress or give the artist more space in which to create folds, movement, or texture within the fabric itself.
He rebounded in the 60’s and 70’s, designing his own line and stunning Paris and the entire fashion world with his own brand of French elegance. However, the stress of his work led him to abuse booze and drugs; in time, the fragile designer’s health became precarious. By 1987, he was unable to fulfill his responsibilities, and allowed others to design his prêt-a-porter line.
In this stage fabric properties like its weight, tenacity, and construction are determined. Now-a-days fabrics are becoming smarter. For the textile development there are new terms are used such as, high performances, technical, intelligent and smart fabric. Some designers select these kinds of fabrics to show their creativity and present it on fashion show.
I love Valentino, Tom Ford, Mary Quant, Yohi Yamamato and Donna Karen. I pull from these guys a lot for my cosplay. No, that isn’t sacrilege. Cosplay cannot be ignored as far as a money making design market goes. Top designs have trickled into cosplay and cosplay has trickled into top designs. There is just no way around it. Nor should there be. 🙂
Experience and a growing social media following can drive up fees over time, which means some illustrators earn thousands of dollars for a single drawing. Walton says her fees have gone "from a few hundred to a few thousand" per job. Another full-time illustrator we spoke with says she is making "four or five times" what she had previously been making at a large corporate design company.
Undoubtedly it's harder to project our own identity onto a famous supermodel draped across a staircase, or align one’s own reality with the digitally enhanced, perceived perfection of a fashion shoot. An illustration is more translatable - it allows for a different daydream. And in a world where reality is often all too stark, and fashion can be somewhat daunting, it's not surprising that our artistic tastes are erring on the side of a little escapism.
Talented and charismatic, he soon drew the attention of VIP’s in the fashion world; they appreciated his chic knitwear and his creativity. Always influenced by art, Gianni Versace drew inspiration from ancient Roman and Greek paintings and sculpture, as well as modern abstracts and Pop Art – producing bold, current designs using color, prints, and careful fitting that accentuated the lines of the body,
Born in August of 1883, Gabrielle Chanel was a French native who was destined to liberate women from the constraints of corsets and other uncomfortable garments. A true rebel and visionary, Chanel, who changed her name to Coco after a brief career as a singer, preferred to wear clothes she could move freely in; often, her style were imbued with a mannish aesthetic. Indeed, Coco Chanel, who designed her first cardigan to avoid pulling any garment over her head, was really the originator of modern women’s sportswear. Her desire for freedom and self-expression gave women style without sacrifice…
Gather magazine clippings, images, bits of fabric, natural materials, or anything else that is relevant to your page. Sort through them to decide which items are essential and which items are optional. Take a few pieces of sturdy paper and play around with different arrangements. Once you have settled on an arrangement, glue or tape the pieces to the paper or papers to create a collage page. Note that it's probably best to do single-sided pages, so that you can move them around freely if necessary.
In my opinion, one of the most fun parts of fashion illustration is when an artist can show the weight and texture of a fabric within their drawing or painting. Whether they’ve taken the time to render corduroy or are skilled at showing the fabric’s weight through movement, I, as a viewer and artist, love to revel in these sorts of details. Instantly I understand the garment I’m seeing, and it’s far more tangible than everything being worn or shown looking the same.
There is only one thing you need to create the gothic fashion style: BLACK. Everything about the gothic style is black, from black hair to black lips, black shirts to black boots. Women who wear gothic fashions will typically be seen wearing tight-fitting clothing, intricate black dresses, and tons of chains, spikes, studs, and other exotic accessory styles. The overall look is designed to say ‘morbid’ and ‘mysterious’, and that is easily accomplished with the super dark clothing and accessories from head to toe.
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