Collage loose supplemental items together and glue them onto good paper. Often your investigative pieces, like interesting textures or structures, will involve a lot of small samples and clippings. Ideally, the person who reviews your portfolio should just be able to flip through it, so collage all of the smaller pieces on letter-sized sheets of paper to make them more readily accessible. Group items by type, or arrange them in a way that makes sense. Provide labels like "color work" or "experimental glazing methods" as needed, and add small explanatory lines or paragraphs if it is necessary for you to show the reader what you were doing.
A static fashion figure can be alright to draw, but you’ll find that it’s often a boring piece. Unless you’re telling a story about the serenity of design, you’ll want your figure to move within the space you set it. When you pose a figure dynamically, you create action for the clothing, hair, accessories or whatever else you’re drawing. You’ll also instantly aid your storytelling within your illustration. Is a figure dancing, walking, or flying through your picture plane? Answer such questions with your drawing. Illustrations tell stories through imagery.

Every aspiring fashion designer will have to make a design portfolio at some point. But with so many pieces and so few guidelines, where do you even begin? It can be hard to get started, but once you know what admissions committees and hiring managers are looking for and how you want to organize your work, you'll be much better equipped to create your own amazing design portfolio.


Fashion. Fashion is completely transparent. It’s fun, it’s confusing, and it never dies off. Fashions from the past are still being worn by women across the country and new fashions are being designed every day. There’s SO many different fashion styles, and we’ve come up with a list of the top 20 looks, from elegant to gothic, exotic to casual, and everything in between.
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