He rebounded in the 60’s and 70’s, designing his own line and stunning Paris and the entire fashion world with his own brand of French elegance. However, the stress of his work led him to abuse booze and drugs; in time, the fragile designer’s health became precarious. By 1987, he was unable to fulfill his responsibilities, and allowed others to design his prêt-a-porter line.

In the City of Light, during the years from 1927 to 1940, Schiaparelli’s reputation for daring designs grew steadily. Soon, Parisians developed a passion for her unusual dresses, sweaters, and accessories. Her signature style always encompassed some whimsical elements, such as lobster motifs or skeleton ribs and bones (made with trapunto quilting); however, the construction of the garments themselves was often quite strict and tailored…this dichotomy made for original pieces that were often “knocked off” by other designers.


Born on April 9, 1963 in New York City, Marc Jacobs suffered a lot with the death of his father at the age of 7. He would eventually move in with his grandmother and that made all the difference. Marc entered the Parsons School of Design and later position at Perry Ellis. Jacobs launched his own collection in 1986, started his own label and continued to impress the fashion world.
Experiment with elements of design like shape, form, silhouette, proportion, texture, pattern and colour. In fashion design process the term silhouette refers to express the overall shape and volume of the design. Silhouette is one of the most important design considerations and it is easy to overlook when working on paper in a two-dimensional context. Designer gives the perfect silhouette from the front side and from the back side or side view. It is the meaningful relationship between garment and body like A-line, I-line, V-line, two tiered silhouette etc.
In the fashion world, new designs are presented in the form of hand-drawn sketches before they’re actually cut and sewn. First you draw a croquis, the model-shaped figure that serves as the base of the sketch. The point is not to draw a realistic-looking figure, but a blank canvas of sorts on which to display illustrations of dresses, skirts, blouses, accessories and the rest of your creations. Adding color and details like ruffles, seams and buttons helps to bring your ideas to life.
I can’t think of a more surreal experience than being in class at a fashion school, finding out your designs are on the cover of WWD, leaving class to go get a copy and coming back to your professor yelling at you. Exactly one year ago today, this happened to Alan Eckstein, one half of Timo Weiland. If that's not an indicator of good things to come for a brand new designer, I don't know what is. It seems like overnight, Timo Weiland and Alan Eckstein--two very young self-proclaimed "fashion geeks" with no technical training--grew a small line of neckwear into a successful full-fledged men's and women's clothing line that will show at Lincoln Center on Sunday. Also an integral part of the team, Donna Kang, the only one with a technical fashion background, is behind the scenes helping to make beautiful things happen. Together, they are unstoppable. We sat down with them in their tiny garment district office/studio to try to figure out how they came together and made all this happen in such a short a mount of time.

That is certainly the experience of Anna Laurini (@annalauriniblue) who has seen her street work welcomed into the fashion art family with voracious enthusiasm. Having studied at Central Saint Martins, Laurini began to emblazon her signature Cubist-influenced, red-lipped face across billboards in Shoreditch and Mayfair “as a break from the studio” and is now regularly called upon for collaborations, most recently by Rupert Sanderson and Japanese label Black by Moussy. “It’s surprised me how popular my work has been in fashion terms,” she says. “I never expected it.” And again, Anna says, it’s the audience that is key to the success of her work. “I never give the woman a story as I paint her,” she says. “It’s really up to the viewer; people often tells me that my work resonates with their particular mood. I like that it’s relatable on a personal level.”
Drawing helps to form design solutions. Designers take notes and sketches whilst on trips from television, films, whilst shopping or researching, from books, galleries, etc. Sketching is an important part of understanding the human form and basic form of dress pattern. Sketchbook is a meaning of practicing the skills of drawing. It develops your illustration and fashion awareness. It is a visual diary of places, events, ideas, patterns, textures, form and colour. Drawing is a presentation of both design and illustration.
Español: preparar un portafolio de diseño de modas, Русский: подготовить портфолио модного дизайнера, Italiano: Preparare un Portfolio di Moda, Português: Criar um Portfólio de Moda com Estilo, Français: préparer un portfolio de créations de mode, Deutsch: Erstelle ein Modedesign Portfolio, Bahasa Indonesia: Mempersiapkan Portofolio Desain Mode, Nederlands: Een portfolio maken als modeontwerper
This is where fashion illustration may collide a bit with editorial illustration. Perhaps you’d like to illustrate the figure walking down a runway or through a busy city. Allowing a simple background into your work may help viewers understand the context for where or when a design is worn. Please note, however, that if a background is busy, it may overwhelm the fashion design itself.
“Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury.” No quote could be more appropriate from the woman who gave us the little black dress. Born August 19, 1883, in Saumur, France, Coco Chanel is famous for her timeless designs, trademark suits, and little black dresses. Chanel had a brief career as a singer before opening her first clothes shop in 1910. In the 1920s, she launched her first perfume and introduced the Chanel suit and the little black dress.
Thanks for sharing Elsie! I actually just decided that creating a template and photocopying it to draw overtop of is the best technique for me and I put one up for free download http://bittysbitz.blogspot.ca/2013/01/free-croquis-template.html . It lets you spend more time on the sillouhette and details of the garment instead of the body, and as long as you print it in gray or something light, you will hardly even notice it underneath.
When you do stylize your figure, after having learned basic anatomy, you’ll want to do so in order to bring more focus to a particular element of design. For instance, fashion figures are often long-legged and much taller than the average human. In average human proportions, a figure is six to seven heads tall, whereas a fashion figure is eight or even nine heads tall, with most of that additional length being taken up in the legs. This is often used to bring the viewer’s attention to the length of a dress or give the artist more space in which to create folds, movement, or texture within the fabric itself.
While Morrison and Walton both maintain blogs (Travel Write Draw and Markers and Macrons, respectively), they got into the illustration game even more recently than Rodgers, and to hear them tell it, it’s all about Instagram. Morrison got the industry's attention — and built up her own Instagram following — by illustrating looks by prominent designers and street style stars in the hopes that they would regram her, which they often would. Then, in September 2014, Morrison was one of Instagram’s featured users, and her follower count soared from around 8,000 to 145,000 in three weeks. “Instagram has been the number one catalyst for all of my my commissions over the past six months,” she says.
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Movement can also help the viewer understand what makes up the clothing you’re drawing or painting. We’ll discuss texture and weight within textiles more fully below, but understand that if a fabric is light and flowy or heavy and stiff, one of the best ways to show that is through how it moves when placed on a body or when the body itself is in motion. 
In the fashion world, new designs are presented in the form of hand-drawn sketches before they’re actually cut and sewn. First you draw a croquis, the model-shaped figure that serves as the base of the sketch. The point is not to draw a realistic-looking figure, but a blank canvas of sorts on which to display illustrations of dresses, skirts, blouses, accessories and the rest of your creations. Adding color and details like ruffles, seams and buttons helps to bring your ideas to life.
Experience and a growing social media following can drive up fees over time, which means some illustrators earn thousands of dollars for a single drawing. Walton says her fees have gone "from a few hundred to a few thousand" per job. Another full-time illustrator we spoke with says she is making "four or five times" what she had previously been making at a large corporate design company.

Tom Ford studied design at the before he worked for Perry Ellis andCathy Hardwick. Tom was hired in 1990 to oversee Gucci’s women’s wear collections, and had a breakthrough four years later when he was appointed creative director. The Gucci makeover masterminded by Ford was the biggest fashion success story of the late 90s. His sultry rock-star velvet hip-slung trousers, leather stilettos, and Halston-esque dresses were blockbusters. After Gucci’s buyout of Yves Saint Laurent in 1999, Ford also became creative director of YSL Rive Gauche. In 2005, Ford launched the Tom Ford brand.
The bohemian fashion style- always referred to commonly as the ‘boho’ look- can easily be described as a style that focuses mainly on wild and intricate patterns and exotic textures. They get most of their inspiration from gypsys and hippies, creating a standout finish with plenty of tie dye, geometrics, chains, fringes, and other eye-catching designs.
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