The work of Mary Winkler (aka Acrylicana) is vivid and whimsical. It's often child-like in theme, depicting sweets, fanciful creatures and rainbows as well as exploring the world of fashion and garment in illustrated form. Done in a variety of media, including digital, acrylic, watercolour and ink, Mary's work is pop art, graphic and, for lack of a better word, sparkly. Her work is painted on canvas, a variety of papers or printed by way of giclee ink jet or silk screen (usually onto fabric for pouches/bags). Mary studied Illustration at College for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan.
Illustrate your original design. Think about what look you’re trying to create, and represent it down to the last detail. If you’re designing a dress, for example, add patterns, ruffles, text, bows, and so on to create a beautiful piece. Focus on the elements of your design that are unique, and include appropriate accessories so that the style you’re going for is clear.[1] If you need some fresh ideas or don't know where to start, look up fashion trends on the internet or in magazines for inspiration.
One of the most adorable fashion styles, it definitely is a blast from the past. From flapper dresses to pinup clothing and from retro swimwear to indie clothing, the vintage look is a culmination of fashion from the 20’s to the 70’s. It is the one trend that overcame the test of time. Look these celebrities who are feature for their vintage style.
It’s not always apparent if you’re looking at a stylized fashion figure that the artist is at their best when working from anatomically correct proportions. Knowing how to correctly draw a body allows for a variety of freedom when drawing figures and correctly drawing clothing. So whether you’re drawing from photographic reference or from life, you’ll be prepared with knowledge of the shape and proportions of what may not be visible when drawing clothed figures.
In my opinion, one of the most fun parts of fashion illustration is when an artist can show the weight and texture of a fabric within their drawing or painting. Whether they’ve taken the time to render corduroy or are skilled at showing the fabric’s weight through movement, I, as a viewer and artist, love to revel in these sorts of details. Instantly I understand the garment I’m seeing, and it’s far more tangible than everything being worn or shown looking the same.
Exaggerate features of the figure or face of the figure in order to accentuate the designs being displayed. A tiny waist or large hips can show off the curves within a dress. Few facial features will keep the focus on the clothes or body itself. If the focus is on accessories or hair, make the hair big or understate the clothing. Much like caricatures or cartoons, exaggerations within the drawing will diminish some features or make others more prominent. Use stylization to tell a story with your fashion illustration.
London designer Mary Quant was not only an iconic fashion design but also the imortal creator of the miniskirt. Mary had an art-school background and had been designing and manufacturing her own clothes since second half of the twentieth century. She was convinced that fashion needed to be affordable to be accessible to the young, she opened her own retail boutique, Bazaar, on the Kings Road in 1955, introducing the “mod” era and the “Chelsea look.”
Coming from a mid class family from Dominican Republic, Oscar de La Renta moved to Madrid at the early age of 19 wishing to be a painter. In order to make extra money Oscar de La Renta started doing some work as a fashion designer. In 1965, De la Renta took over Arden, the company he was working for at the time and this open the door to start his own brand. The unique tone of red on his dresses became to be known as “De la Renta red”.
Yamamoto was born in Yokohama, Japan on October 3, 1943. He studied law at Keio University and graduated in 1966 with a law degree. He continued his studies on fashion design at the famous Bunkafukuso Gakuin, a fashion institute in Tokyo. Yamamoto blends the exotic and powerful designs of traditional Japanese dress with Western daywear, and achieves a unique, abstract style.  He is an uncompromising, nontraditional designer.  Yamamoto drapes and wraps the body in unstructured, loose, voluminous garments, similar in style and philosophy to those of Rei Kawakubo.  Many of his clothes have additional flaps, pockets and straps.
One of the world’s most successful fashion designers, Diane von Fürstenberg impressed the fashion world when she introduced her now-iconic “wrap dress” for the working woman in 1972. Elegance, ease, and accessibility have always been the core of her design philosophy, which has allowed her to turn DVF into a global luxury lifestyle brand. In 2005, she became the recipient of the CFDA’s Lifetime Achievement Award.
Come up with an organizing principle. Whatever you do, you should probably try to keep different parts of one project together as much as possible. So, for example, if you explored organic structures like feathers and leaves for one project and tribal or folk art for another, try to keep the various parts of those projects together. Ultimately, you need an organizational principle because you'll have to choose how you want to present those projects.[2]

Giorgio Armani, an outstanding Italian fashion designer, particularly noted for his menswear for his clean, tailored lines. He formed his company, Armani, in 1975, and by 2001 was acclaimed as the most successful designer to come out of Italy, with an annual turnover of $1.6 billion and a personal fortune of $7 billion as of 2012. Armani is also the first ever designer to ban models who has a Body Mass Index under 18. He is truly a living legend and a great fashion designer.
Eleven new designers will show their spring 2012 collections tonight thanks to the newly revived Gen Art, an institution that has helped propel labels like Vena Cava, Zac Posen and Phillip Lim into the spotlight. They had to take a little break due to financial woes, but now they're back in full force with their annual "Fresh Faces in Fashion presented by smart car" program. Gen Art has selected the following lucky 11 women's, men's and accessory designers to showcase their stuff for editors and buyers in a fully staged runway show. But, it's not just luck--each of these designers are genuinely talented and, from what we've seen very promising. Many of them are already on the road to success--one's being sold at Madewell--and have impressive pedigrees, like Central St. Martins degrees and a gig at Alexander McQueen. Also, three of them made it into our Fashionista 15. We think they're all ones to watch and we wanted to share their stories so, we interviewed each of them for mini versions of our How I'm Making It series. Click through to find out how these future stars have been and where they're going.
Whatever the catalyst, fashion illustration is having 'a moment’. It has been fidgeting the industry for some time - perhaps since Nick Knight introduced Helen Downie’s Unskilled Worker into fashion's limelight two years ago, and it’s now truly kicking. Grace Coddington and Michael Robert’s GingerNutz story in our December issue - whose cover itself generated a multitude of illustrated versions that flooded the social channels - stands as definitive proof. The video of Coddington talking about it generated 10,000 views in its first twelve hours on YouTube, while Caroline Stein’s Instagram version of Pat McGrath’s LABS generated 100 likes-a-minute for the first hour it was live. People clearly like looking at it.
If there is one thing that is constant, it is “change”. And change is exactly the one thing that is constant when it comes to fashion. Since the beginning of human civilization, there has been a constant effort being put to make one look better. The different styles in fashion have always gone through innumerable changes. With the increase in the amount of innovations, the change in trend and fashion styles have also been rapid. So keeping that in mind, here is the list of a few fashion styles that we accepted with all our hearts:
A New-Delhi based stylist and was the first one to lead Jean-Louis Scherrer, a French-Fashion-Brand. Her collection is matchless! Her designs have drawn attention in Mumbai, Delhi, USA, London, Bangalore and Paris. It was 1987, that she did ‘er graduation from Delhi-University & then joined fashion-industry. In1990, Ritu started her distinguished career by launching her clothing-line named “Lavanya” that was a big hit! She signed up the National-Institute-Of-Fashion-Technology in 1988 that is linked to Fashion-Institue-Of-Technology in newyork.
It’s not hard to point out a gal that wears the cowgirl fashion style! In this particular style, there’s a few staples that are an absolute must for the wardrobe: undoubtedly an adorable cowgirl hat, typically in either some shade of brown or pink, a pair of flared blue jeans with western themed leather belt, denim jacket to match, a pair of cowgirl boots, and a few white t-shirt and plaid button-ups.
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