“It was the death of the last grand master, René Bouché, in 1963 which really signified the end of classic fashion illustration,” says David Downton, who has almost single handedly kept illustration in the limelight over the last 20 years having sketched in the front row of the couture shows for the last 40 seasons straight; illustrated countless celebrities for Vanity Fair and, in 2009, drawn Cate Blanchett for a record-selling anniversary issue of Australian Vogue - as well as having played “artist in residence” at Claridges for the last decade where he can often be found in Le Fumoir sketching anyone from Julianne Moore or Grace Jones to Michael Caine. “It coincided with the rise of the celebrity photographers - and fashion always voraciously wants what is new.”
Rei Kawakubo went to university and studied art and literature, like a lot of bright girls do. But then she taught herself how to design, set up shop, and soon started to change the fashion world. In 1973, she created her own company, Comme des Garçons Co. Ltd in Tokyo and opened up her first boutique store in Tokyo in 1975. Starting with women’s clothes, Kawakubo added a men’s line in 1978. Comme des Garçons specializes in anti-fashion, austere, sometimes deconstructed garments.
Full name is Jagsharan Jit Singh Ahluwalia. JJ Valaya needs no introduction. Another eminent name, a couturier from New-Delhi and has an incredible bridal collection and master of hand-embroideries! He originated the “House of Valaya” along with his brother TJ Singh, in 1992, a lifestyle and luxury fashion house. It has revived and redefined age! In 1994, Valaya became 1st Indian couture-label to have a SOLO SHOW in India. He’s celebrated world-wide in London, Dubai, NewYork, Paris, Singapore, Hong Kong and Johannesburg. It is said about him that he has combined future with past in the present. His pioneering and innovative designs guarantee that the majestic epoch of regal India will remain in power even in the present!

In the Seventies, Halston befriended (and dressed) members of the international jet set, including Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli, and Liz Taylor. Dressed in his trademark black turtleneck, he could often be found partying at Studio 54 and enjoying his success with a host of celebrity friends. Licensing deals made him very wealthy, but tragedy lay in the distance…drug addiction and an AIDS diagnosis in 1988 led to his downfall. Unable to cope with the demands of his career, he was fired from his own company…Halston died of AIDS-related complications in 1990.
Eleven new designers will show their spring 2012 collections tonight thanks to the newly revived Gen Art, an institution that has helped propel labels like Vena Cava, Zac Posen and Phillip Lim into the spotlight. They had to take a little break due to financial woes, but now they're back in full force with their annual "Fresh Faces in Fashion presented by smart car" program. Gen Art has selected the following lucky 11 women's, men's and accessory designers to showcase their stuff for editors and buyers in a fully staged runway show. But, it's not just luck--each of these designers are genuinely talented and, from what we've seen very promising. Many of them are already on the road to success--one's being sold at Madewell--and have impressive pedigrees, like Central St. Martins degrees and a gig at Alexander McQueen. Also, three of them made it into our Fashionista 15. We think they're all ones to watch and we wanted to share their stories so, we interviewed each of them for mini versions of our How I'm Making It series. Click through to find out how these future stars have been and where they're going.

In 1966 Paco Rabanne opened his own outlet at the age of 32, where he earned international repute for his metal-linked plastic-disc dresses, sun goggles and jewelry made of plastic in primary colors. Paco Rabanne’s dresses made of small plastic tiles linked together by chains, stole the show in Paris. His first collection, titled “12 Unwearable Dresses in Contemporary Materials,” sums up his philosophy that “the only new frontier left in fashion is the finding of new materials.” Throughout his career, Rabanne experimented with everything from plastic and aluminum to fiberglass and paper to create futuristic, eccentric, yet highly influential garments.

Fashion is the niche that is undergoing significant changes with time. 20th century has witnessed some great enhancements in both women and men apparels. These significant changes have happened due to the work of some icons in the fashion industry. There are so many popular names among these fashion designers who are still known due to their incredible contributions to the fashion industry. They have really made elegant and creative clothing that could reveal the beauty of a women in the most amazing manner. The apparels of men also were striking and which could bring out the manly look in any man. Here are the most popular fashion designers. They have set standards which can be followed by the designers of the new era. These great individuals are always immortal in the fashion industry. These names are much familiar for all the individuals who are related with the fashion industry.
In the City of Light, during the years from 1927 to 1940, Schiaparelli’s reputation for daring designs grew steadily. Soon, Parisians developed a passion for her unusual dresses, sweaters, and accessories. Her signature style always encompassed some whimsical elements, such as lobster motifs or skeleton ribs and bones (made with trapunto quilting); however, the construction of the garments themselves was often quite strict and tailored…this dichotomy made for original pieces that were often “knocked off” by other designers.
The very first collection of Christian Dior called ‘New Look’, was destined to become a turning point in women’s fashion. His very feminine ideal fashion designs became a sharp contrast to the harsh post-war vogue from that time. Christian Dior came to stay for a long time! Today, the fashion house Dior is on top of the fashion industry, and Christian Dior himself definitely was the best clothes fashion designer.
She is the sister of Gianni Versace, and she has proven to be no lesser sibling. After the murder of Gianni in 1997, Donatella took over and has taken the Versace name to new heights. She made sure that Versace shops would cater to the different fashion centers around the world, particularly Milan and New York. Top celebrities like Jennifer Lopez and Madonna have endorsed the company’s collection of clothes, accessories, fragrances and home furnishings.
As illustration has emerged as a tool for cutting through the visual noise of social media, it has itself benefitted from social media’s own disruption of the traditional barometers of quality. Just as David Bowie prophesied in his famous 1999 Newsnight interview that the internet would demystify the relationship between artist and audience, social media has “smashed down the gatekeepers”, says Downie, who doesn’t consider a picture finished until it’s given a “moment of birth” by being published on her Instagram account. “I cried when I saw that Bowie interview,” she says. “It’s so profoundly right, and it’s exactly what happened with my work.”
The Italian-born Frenchman is lauded for his 20th century pieces that looked as though they were from the 25th century. As Cardin rose to fame in the age of the space race, his creations took on an air of futurism. His so-called bubble dresses had all the fixings of science fiction, combining earthly elegance with out-of-this-world colors and avant garde design. They may be wacky, sure, but Cardin’s clothes showed a freedom of expression that highlighted larger ideals, in particular the emancipation of women. The visionary designer fell out of critical favor when he attached his name to less fashionable items, from cars to umbrellas, but his futuristic, space-centric legacy will live to infinity and beyond.
London designer Mary Quant was not only an iconic fashion design but also the imortal creator of the miniskirt. Mary had an art-school background and had been designing and manufacturing her own clothes since second half of the twentieth century. She was convinced that fashion needed to be affordable to be accessible to the young, she opened her own retail boutique, Bazaar, on the Kings Road in 1955, introducing the “mod” era and the “Chelsea look.”
“Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury.” No quote could be more appropriate from the woman who gave us the little black dress. Born August 19, 1883, in Saumur, France, Coco Chanel is famous for her timeless designs, trademark suits, and little black dresses. Chanel had a brief career as a singer before opening her first clothes shop in 1910. In the 1920s, she launched her first perfume and introduced the Chanel suit and the little black dress.
Known as the prince of Prints, the fashion designer Emilio Pucci got known for his tight shantung “Pucci pants” and vividly printed silk dresses and blouses. His colorful, informal uniforms for Braniff flight attendants were groundbreaking. Later, Pucci branched into men’s fashions, perfume, and ceramics. He also served as a member of the Italian Parliament. His color trends and designs are one of KOKET’s most lovable inspirations.
If you are presented with a figure whose body is hidden underneath a large dress, for instance, knowing the gestural form beneath it allows you to create poses that may not exist quickly and easily. Being able to move your figure around without having to directly copy from a photo or ask a model to make said pose means more flexibility when your client asks for a specific pose or concept.

This is where fashion illustration may collide a bit with editorial illustration. Perhaps you’d like to illustrate the figure walking down a runway or through a busy city. Allowing a simple background into your work may help viewers understand the context for where or when a design is worn. Please note, however, that if a background is busy, it may overwhelm the fashion design itself.

Talented and charismatic, he soon drew the attention of VIP’s in the fashion world; they appreciated his chic knitwear and his creativity. Always influenced by art, Gianni Versace drew inspiration from ancient Roman and Greek paintings and sculpture, as well as modern abstracts and Pop Art – producing bold, current designs using color, prints, and careful fitting that accentuated the lines of the body,


The balance line should be a straight vertical line, even if you want the model to pose in a leaning position. For example, if you want the the model to be posed with her hips tilted slightly to her left, draw a straight balance line in the middle of the page. You want this line to extend from the top of the model's head to the ground that she is standing on.
Illustrate your original design. Think about what look you’re trying to create, and represent it down to the last detail. If you’re designing a dress, for example, add patterns, ruffles, text, bows, and so on to create a beautiful piece. Focus on the elements of your design that are unique, and include appropriate accessories so that the style you’re going for is clear.[1] If you need some fresh ideas or don't know where to start, look up fashion trends on the internet or in magazines for inspiration.
Much like showing the texture, weight, and limits of movement within a textile, being able to render various objects so the viewer understands what they’re comprised of not only helps communicate concept design and storytelling within a fashion illustration, but also allows the viewer to better connect with what’s been drawn as being analogous to a real-world object or familiar material.
A mother-of-four, Downie clearly has a knack for “accidental” success having initially touched upon the fashion scene via a short stint making jewellery at her kitchen table which was selling at hip Covent Garden store Koh Samui in the late Nineties - before “one day I was cooking fishfinger sandwiches and [Net-A-Porter.com founder] Natalie Massenet calls up to ask if she can buy some for this new online thing she was doing”. Whether professionally trained or not, she’s keen that fashion illustrators are worthy of being called artists regardless of their status in relation to photographers. Certainly her own work is now bought by collectors all over the world at prices akin to fine art, regardless of what her subjects are depicted wearing. Citing the work of her Gucci collaborator Ignaci, as well as that of Kelly Brennan and Jill Button, “it crosses the line of design and fine art”, she says. “Whatever that umbrella term can be called. It shouldn’t be relegated to just fashion illustration.”
Jean-Paul Gaultier is a French fashion designer born on 1952 in Val-de-Marne, France. At age 18, he joined the house of Pierre Cardin before moving on to Jacques Esterel and Patou. The appearance of Gaultier’s collection was in 1976, but his own design house was only launched on 1982. Jean Paul Gaultier‘s sensual, irreverent style continually challenges stereotypical femininity, ignoring traditional gender roles by embracing androgyny and the freedom of sexuality. His style is known to challenge standard views of fashion.
“I love a woman, I love to judge how beautiful she is, how beautiful I can make her.” Here at KOKET we are as in love with women as Cavalli. This italian designer Roberto Cavalli presented his first collection in 1970 and came to be known for his lavishly printed and colored leatherwear and denim. In 1999, he introduced menswear and eyewear and followed with Cavalli Jeans (later renamed to Just Cavalli) in 2000.
“Photography has long been considered superior to illustration when it comes to selling magazines” says Downton. “But it’s like asking what an apple can do that a banana can’t. I think they have a symbiotic relationship. Illustration changes the pace of a magazine as you read it; and you project your own finish onto the story which gives a different sense of satisfaction to the reader.”
It’s rather easy to describe the sporty fashion style: it’s sporty! Girls will typically wear some popular sport companies like Adidas or Nike and will always have runner shoes (or similar style shoes) on. They prefer a simple and subtle look that oozes ‘sports’, with plain colors like white, black, and gray being BIG hits. They won’t strive for anything fashionable or flashy and would prefer sweatpants, tight runner pants, and basic tees. Don’t forget the ponytail to finish it off!
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