In the fashion world, new designs are presented in the form of hand-drawn sketches before they’re actually cut and sewn. First you draw a croquis, the model-shaped figure that serves as the base of the sketch. The point is not to draw a realistic-looking figure, but a blank canvas of sorts on which to display illustrations of dresses, skirts, blouses, accessories and the rest of your creations. Adding color and details like ruffles, seams and buttons helps to bring your ideas to life.
Known as the prince of Prints, the fashion designer Emilio Pucci got known for his tight shantung “Pucci pants” and vividly printed silk dresses and blouses. His colorful, informal uniforms for Braniff flight attendants were groundbreaking. Later, Pucci branched into men’s fashions, perfume, and ceramics. He also served as a member of the Italian Parliament. His color trends and designs are one of KOKET’s most lovable inspirations.
A most notable Indian-fashion-designer. He’s identified for his work in fashion-industry since 1987, and is another Bollywood-dearest. He got his degree from New York institute of fashion technology, and when came back, realized that there is a huge appeal of designer-wear in India, so he opted for being a dress-stylist and revolutionized the field of fashion in 1987, by opening his very first boutique in India with a name “Ensemble”. His own label is named as ”Ahilian” and in 1990, established his design studio “Tahiliani Design Studio” in New Delhi. This brand is well-known for artistic and perfect styles. His clothes are sold not only in India but also in London, New York, Tokyo, Dubai and Hong Kong.
While as a medium it has been sidelined as old fashioned in comparison to the cutting edge that photography presented - made all the more thrilling by a Bailey-esque reputation for rebellion - in those days fashion illustration led the fashion press, inspiring new attitudes and breathing new life into past ones. In doing so it created a visual timeline of life since Vogue began. It never completely disappeared, but recently it has come back to explosive effect. Perhaps our first Vogue under editor Edward Enninful was such a marker in the sand of the new that it has generated a naturally concurrent upsurge in nostalgia; or perhaps, as technology erupts around us, we yearn for the quiet of a considered illustration, alive with the possibility of the artist's internal thoughts as much as with the potential of our own interpretation.
Another important factor to consider when pursuing a career in fashion illustration is stability. Like any freelancing situation, there can be lulls and bursts of work with unpredictable pay days. Walton ultimately eschewed the uncertainty of a full-time illustration career, and joined The Sartorialist as fashion director last fall. "You can make a career out of [illustration], but you really have to hustle. That’s the nature of freelance, you never really know." 
Another India’s old hand and expert designer, from New-Delhi and designs both for men and women! His outfits are worn by Bollywood-actresses and has been in the field since 1980’s. He was given a title of “India’s-Master-Of-Fabric-And-Fantasy”, in 1996 by Time magazine. He has quite perfect sense of creativity & each of his invention is crafed to excellence. He did his graduation from St. Stephen College of NewDelhi with a first class(hons.) degree in history and created his first traditional line for men back in 1990. His client celebrities include Pamela Anderson, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Cambell, Anna Koirnikova nd Uma Thurman and most of his fashion-shows are done in Singapore, NewYork, India and Paris and also is the brand-ambassador of Omega-watches since 2001.
Yamamoto was born in Yokohama, Japan on October 3, 1943. He studied law at Keio University and graduated in 1966 with a law degree. He continued his studies on fashion design at the famous Bunkafukuso Gakuin, a fashion institute in Tokyo. Yamamoto blends the exotic and powerful designs of traditional Japanese dress with Western daywear, and achieves a unique, abstract style.  He is an uncompromising, nontraditional designer.  Yamamoto drapes and wraps the body in unstructured, loose, voluminous garments, similar in style and philosophy to those of Rei Kawakubo.  Many of his clothes have additional flaps, pockets and straps.
Son of Russian working class immigrants, Ralph Lauren has transformed himself into the sophisticated billionaire. His classic and preppy designs all draw upon an image of old world wealth and luxury, and he pioneered the concept of clothes as part of a lifestyle environment. Lauren worked in retail before developing a line of neckties. The brand he established, Polo, is now one part of an empire that includes fragrances, home furnishings and luxury clothing. Today, his five billion dollar business includes several clothing lines as well as perfumes, house ware, furniture and paint.
The college look would be the tag most suitable for the preppy look. The collared T-Shirts are matched and A-line skirts are matched with girly blouses that are lined up in their wardrobe. A cute little headband and geeky glasses mostly do accompany with this style. The geeky look might seem to be an expensive style, but it is not required to shell out much to get this look as it is not that luxurious.
Whatever the catalyst, fashion illustration is having 'a moment’. It has been fidgeting the industry for some time - perhaps since Nick Knight introduced Helen Downie’s Unskilled Worker into fashion's limelight two years ago, and it’s now truly kicking. Grace Coddington and Michael Robert’s GingerNutz story in our December issue - whose cover itself generated a multitude of illustrated versions that flooded the social channels - stands as definitive proof. The video of Coddington talking about it generated 10,000 views in its first twelve hours on YouTube, while Caroline Stein’s Instagram version of Pat McGrath’s LABS generated 100 likes-a-minute for the first hour it was live. People clearly like looking at it.
“It was the death of the last grand master, René Bouché, in 1963 which really signified the end of classic fashion illustration,” says David Downton, who has almost single handedly kept illustration in the limelight over the last 20 years having sketched in the front row of the couture shows for the last 40 seasons straight; illustrated countless celebrities for Vanity Fair and, in 2009, drawn Cate Blanchett for a record-selling anniversary issue of Australian Vogue - as well as having played “artist in residence” at Claridges for the last decade where he can often be found in Le Fumoir sketching anyone from Julianne Moore or Grace Jones to Michael Caine. “It coincided with the rise of the celebrity photographers - and fashion always voraciously wants what is new.”

Known for his stunning couture designs and his sophisticated women’s tuxedo jackets (known as le smoking), Saint Laurent was destined to carve out his own identity, but his career was not without its challenges. After a poorly received collection at Dior, which featured hobble skirts and other unusual designs, he was sent into mandatory military service. The stress of being in the army (although he lasted only 20 days) took a tremendous toll on the sensitive designer. He suffered from teasing and hazing by his fellow soldiers, and he soon plunged into a nervous breakdown; he was sent to a mental hospital for treatment.

Chanel led a long and fascinating life, which included some darker episodes, such as an affair with a Nazi officer during World War II. He used his influence to ensure that she could continue to live in comfort at the Hotel Ritz during the conflict. Many wondered why Chanel was not charged for collaborating when the war ended – it is believed (and very likely true) that friends in high places protected her from retribution. Coco Chanel died in Paris, at the Ritz, in 1971.
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I don’t know what style category I fit into. I seem to have casual, sexy, girly, punk and tomboy. I even like the sporty style. It actually depends on my mood but most of the time, I like romantic clothes with lace, chic stuff, and if I don’t feel like dressing up, I just want casual or tomboy. Usually with crop tops and high waisted jeans. What….am I???
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