“I love a woman, I love to judge how beautiful she is, how beautiful I can make her.” Here at KOKET we are as in love with women as Cavalli. This italian designer Roberto Cavalli presented his first collection in 1970 and came to be known for his lavishly printed and colored leatherwear and denim. In 1999, he introduced menswear and eyewear and followed with Cavalli Jeans (later renamed to Just Cavalli) in 2000.

The people who prefer this are the ones who require everything at best quality. Nothing satisfies them if it is not worth the trouble. They often look for styles that make a statement on the quality, polished manner and culture. Most of them are the ones who are from higher status and are also in a way related to how a businesswoman would dress up. Sophisticated can be characterized as businesswoman minus the formal look. Culture and luxury mean the most to the people who choose this style of fashion.
It’s not hard to point out a gal that wears the cowgirl fashion style! In this particular style, there’s a few staples that are an absolute must for the wardrobe: undoubtedly an adorable cowgirl hat, typically in either some shade of brown or pink, a pair of flared blue jeans with western themed leather belt, denim jacket to match, a pair of cowgirl boots, and a few white t-shirt and plaid button-ups.
The top icon of fashion design, Elsa Schiaparelli was born on September 10, 1890, in Italy. After working at a boutique in New York, Schiaparelli moved to Paris, where she began designing her own clothes. Her work and sense of style shaped the look of fashion in the 1920s and ’30s, and her clothes were worn by some of the world’s most famous women, including American actress Greta Garbo. Schiaparelli died in Paris on November 13, 1973.
Textile patterns can also help coordinate various pieces when you match up a color or two from a print within other garments or accessories in a design. This is especially apparent when you’re illustrating a line of clothing and begin to notice how various pieces within a set, though not all worn together or by the same person, may call back to each other with the use of the same patterns or colors from a pattern.
These boys Abu-Jani and Sandeep Khosla, as a duo are legendary in the fashion-circuit and earned success, hype, fame and attention. They were the first and the foremost to exhibit their work at Harrods, the UK luxury store. Though they lack in pro training, yet their designs are exclusive, distinctive and remarkable. All the time, they travel to the distant and remote areas in quest of the hidden-styles that are yet to be exposed. This creative coalition exudes talent and attitude!

Fashion designer Jimmy Choo was born in Penang, Malaysia in 1961. He used the craftsmanship he learned from his father, also a cobbler, to create some of the most coveted shoes in the world. Choo opened his first shop in Hackney in 1986 in an old hospital building. Within two years of opening his shop, Choo’s shoes were featured in an eight-page spread in Vogue magazine. Soon, Choo became the darling of the celebrity world, in particular Princess Diana, who donned Choo’s footwear seemingly everywhere she went. Jimmy Choo rose to fame for the quality and style of his handmade women’s shoes.
Exaggerate features of the figure or face of the figure in order to accentuate the designs being displayed. A tiny waist or large hips can show off the curves within a dress. Few facial features will keep the focus on the clothes or body itself. If the focus is on accessories or hair, make the hair big or understate the clothing. Much like caricatures or cartoons, exaggerations within the drawing will diminish some features or make others more prominent. Use stylization to tell a story with your fashion illustration.

Valentino started his brilliant and admirable career in the world of fashion in 1950 when he moved to Paris to study design. His classically elegant and feminine designs made women look utterly glamorous. The Italian maestro worked at houses Dessus and Laroche before going back to Rome to set up his business in 1959. By the mid-1960s, Valentino was a favorite designer of the world’s best-dressed women, including Jacqueline Kennedy. Among his signatures is a particular fabric shade, known as “Valentino red.”


It was through Instagram that Walton landed her first commission — paying $500 (a pretty low fee if you’re an established illustrator), which she couldn’t believe. “It was like, oh my god, they want to give me $500 for something I do in my free time?” Later on, she got an email from the creative director of InStyle, Rina Stone. It turned out an editor had shown Stone Walton’s Instagram, and Walton ended up creating artwork for an 18-page spread in the magazine. “If you have a skill and you just try and put it out there, it’s amazing how you could really reach anybody now.”

Finish with the feet and arms. The feet are relatively narrow. Draw them like elongated triangles that are about the same length as the head. Construct the arms like the legs, tapered toward the wrists. Make them longer in proportion to the torso than a real person’s arms would be, since this gives a more stylized impression. Add the hands and fingers last.


In fact, Schiaparelli’s designs were often all too simple to copy, unlike the work of her chief rival, Coco Chanel. After World War II, Schiaparelli, who had lived in New York during the war, returned to Paris and found a different sensibility among its people. The post-war desire for simplicity and practicality made the unique embellishments of her designs less popular, and the endless knock-offs also cut into her profits.
“It’s changing, and it’s becoming a much more friendly industry for women particularly,” says Susannah Garrod, who studied fine art at Central Saint Martins and now counts Vogue, Jimmy Choo, Emilia Wickstead and Jessica McCormack as clients as well as contributing to the Fashion Illustration Gallery stable run by William Ling. “Instagram allowed me to record more personal, rather than client-based work - which in turn generated more work ... as a 'jobbing' illustrator it’s been rewarding to be commissioned for work in my own right rather than creating illustrations strictly dictated by the client. These days fashion illustration is appreciated by a more social savvy audience as an art form rather than a 'paint by numbers' necessity to record. People are looking for something different if they commission a fashion illustrator rather than a photographer - it’s no longer the 'poor relation' but an intimate way of interpreting fashion which stands the test of time as a commentary on the industry as a whole.”
As illustration has emerged as a tool for cutting through the visual noise of social media, it has itself benefitted from social media’s own disruption of the traditional barometers of quality. Just as David Bowie prophesied in his famous 1999 Newsnight interview that the internet would demystify the relationship between artist and audience, social media has “smashed down the gatekeepers”, says Downie, who doesn’t consider a picture finished until it’s given a “moment of birth” by being published on her Instagram account. “I cried when I saw that Bowie interview,” she says. “It’s so profoundly right, and it’s exactly what happened with my work.”

Gather materials. Choose a hard lead pencil (H pencils are best) that makes light, sketchy marks that are easy to erase. Marks made with these pencils also don't indent the paper, which is helpful when you want to add color to the image. A good quality eraser and thick paper are also important materials to have if you want your sketch to look professional.
Halston’s association with Jackie Kennedy was a crucial factor in his rising fame; she generally eschewed hats until she became charmed by Halston’s distinctive pillbox styles during the Sixties. She wore one of his designs to the Presidential Inauguration in 1961; she was also wearing a pillbox hat (in pink) on the day her husband, John F. Kennedy, was assassinated.
In fact, Schiaparelli’s designs were often all too simple to copy, unlike the work of her chief rival, Coco Chanel. After World War II, Schiaparelli, who had lived in New York during the war, returned to Paris and found a different sensibility among its people. The post-war desire for simplicity and practicality made the unique embellishments of her designs less popular, and the endless knock-offs also cut into her profits.
It’s not hard to point out a gal that wears the cowgirl fashion style! In this particular style, there’s a few staples that are an absolute must for the wardrobe: undoubtedly an adorable cowgirl hat, typically in either some shade of brown or pink, a pair of flared blue jeans with western themed leather belt, denim jacket to match, a pair of cowgirl boots, and a few white t-shirt and plaid button-ups.
×