Draw the balance line. This is a the first line of your sketch, and it represents your model’s center of gravity. Draw it from the top of the head to the tip of the toes, along the backbone of your croquis. Now draw an oval to represent the head. This is the base of your croquis, and from this, a proportional drawing can be made. You can think of the croquis as the skeleton of the model.
Son of Russian working class immigrants, Ralph Lauren has transformed himself into the sophisticated billionaire. His classic and preppy designs all draw upon an image of old world wealth and luxury, and he pioneered the concept of clothes as part of a lifestyle environment. Lauren worked in retail before developing a line of neckties. The brand he established, Polo, is now one part of an empire that includes fragrances, home furnishings and luxury clothing. Today, his five billion dollar business includes several clothing lines as well as perfumes, house ware, furniture and paint.
A New-Delhi based stylist and was the first one to lead Jean-Louis Scherrer, a French-Fashion-Brand. Her collection is matchless! Her designs have drawn attention in Mumbai, Delhi, USA, London, Bangalore and Paris. It was 1987, that she did ‘er graduation from Delhi-University & then joined fashion-industry. In1990, Ritu started her distinguished career by launching her clothing-line named “Lavanya” that was a big hit! She signed up the National-Institute-Of-Fashion-Technology in 1988 that is linked to Fashion-Institue-Of-Technology in newyork.
“It was the death of the last grand master, René Bouché, in 1963 which really signified the end of classic fashion illustration,” says David Downton, who has almost single handedly kept illustration in the limelight over the last 20 years having sketched in the front row of the couture shows for the last 40 seasons straight; illustrated countless celebrities for Vanity Fair and, in 2009, drawn Cate Blanchett for a record-selling anniversary issue of Australian Vogue - as well as having played “artist in residence” at Claridges for the last decade where he can often be found in Le Fumoir sketching anyone from Julianne Moore or Grace Jones to Michael Caine. “It coincided with the rise of the celebrity photographers - and fashion always voraciously wants what is new.”
Coming from a mid class family from Dominican Republic, Oscar de La Renta moved to Madrid at the early age of 19 wishing to be a painter. In order to make extra money Oscar de La Renta started doing some work as a fashion designer. In 1965, De la Renta took over Arden, the company he was working for at the time and this open the door to start his own brand. The unique tone of red on his dresses became to be known as “De la Renta red”.
Son of Russian working class immigrants, Ralph Lauren has transformed himself into the sophisticated billionaire. His classic and preppy designs all draw upon an image of old world wealth and luxury, and he pioneered the concept of clothes as part of a lifestyle environment. Lauren worked in retail before developing a line of neckties. The brand he established, Polo, is now one part of an empire that includes fragrances, home furnishings and luxury clothing. Today, his five billion dollar business includes several clothing lines as well as perfumes, house ware, furniture and paint.
Additionally, hair can be a main focal point of a fashion illustration. If the story of the illustration is to depict a hairstyle or show off various hair accessories, the hair may be what drives the composition of the piece or even holds all of the action within it as a dress in a larger, full-body illustration would. Many of the tips for clothing apply for hair as well: form, texture, composition, movement, and style are all relevant points when featuring a hairstyle within your fashion illustration.
These boys Abu-Jani and Sandeep Khosla, as a duo are legendary in the fashion-circuit and earned success, hype, fame and attention. They were the first and the foremost to exhibit their work at Harrods, the UK luxury store. Though they lack in pro training, yet their designs are exclusive, distinctive and remarkable. All the time, they travel to the distant and remote areas in quest of the hidden-styles that are yet to be exposed. This creative coalition exudes talent and attitude!
Really interesting. Didn’t know the term “croquis”. I love using tracing paper when starting a painting. I used to get heat from a peer in art school about how tracing paper and graphite paper was “cheating”. I think it’s an essential tool if you want to get through a stage of sketching and then elaborate and change later. Let it be your friend! Thanks, Elsie!
Sure, it’s a green dress, but is it silk, tulle, or a heavy woven material? The way it’s drawn, the way it drapes around a figure, and even the way it’s colored or painted should give the viewer an idea of the sort of textile being depicted. At the very least, I want to understand what a garment may feel like when worn. If I’m being sold clothing from an illustration, for instance, I should be able to figure out if the clothing is warm and cozy or light and breezy. You’ll want to viewer to understand if the textile is smooth and soft or stiff and itchy.
Every collection of this talented designer is doomed for success. His works can be unhesitatingly called masterpieces: he’s never afraid of expressing himself in the wackiest, the most sophisticated, out-of-this-world shapes and colors. Pierre Cardin is the inventor of the ‘bubble dress’. His works can be easily told from the others: Cardin’s models look like they’ve come out from the SCI-FI novels :).

Come up with an organizing principle. Whatever you do, you should probably try to keep different parts of one project together as much as possible. So, for example, if you explored organic structures like feathers and leaves for one project and tribal or folk art for another, try to keep the various parts of those projects together. Ultimately, you need an organizational principle because you'll have to choose how you want to present those projects.[2]
I love Valentino, Tom Ford, Mary Quant, Yohi Yamamato and Donna Karen. I pull from these guys a lot for my cosplay. No, that isn’t sacrilege. Cosplay cannot be ignored as far as a money making design market goes. Top designs have trickled into cosplay and cosplay has trickled into top designs. There is just no way around it. Nor should there be. 🙂
Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.
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