“Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury.” No quote could be more appropriate from the woman who gave us the little black dress. Born August 19, 1883, in Saumur, France, Coco Chanel is famous for her timeless designs, trademark suits, and little black dresses. Chanel had a brief career as a singer before opening her first clothes shop in 1910. In the 1920s, she launched her first perfume and introduced the Chanel suit and the little black dress.


Lauren first gained acclaim with his wide ties, which were often made of unusual fabrics. These standout accessories were not yet trendy in the late Sixties, when he began to try and sell them to New York stores. Soon, word spread about Lauren’s somewhat dandyish personal style and his flashy neckwear; he used this success to find investors and then he branched out into men’s and ladies suits and casual wear. Eventually, his clothing lines were sold at high-end stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue, where they became extremely popular.
It was during this period that many design houses began to hire artists to sketch or paint designs for garments. The images were shown to clients, which was much cheaper than producing an actual sample garment in the workroom. If the client liked their design, they ordered it and the resulting garment made money for the house. Thus, the tradition of designers sketching out garment designs instead of presenting completed garments on models to customers began as an economy.

London has long been the capital of the United Kingdom fashion industry and has a wide range of foreign designs which have integrated with modern British styles. Typical, British design is smart but innovative yet recently has become more and more unconventional, fusing traditional styles with modern techniques. Vintage styles play an important role in the British fashion and styling industry. Stylists regularly 'mix and match' the old with the new, which gives British style that unique, bohemian aesthetic that many of the other fashion capitals try to imitate. Irish fashion (both design and styling) is also heavily influenced by fashion trends from Britain.

Born in Rome in 1890 to an aristocratic mother and an intellectual father, Schiaparelli soon rebelled against the conventional life of the upper classes. Her desire for exploration and experimentation landed her in hot water as a teen, when she published a book of poems with decidedly sensual overtones. Her work deeply offended her parents, who punished her by placing her in a convent. Schiaparelli was so determined to escape from the nunnery that she initiated a hunger strike which resulted in her release. By her early twenties she had fled to London, where she could live under less scrutiny. Later, during a foray in New York, she joined with artist friends and they all made their way to Paris…

Rei Kawakubo went to university and studied art and literature, like a lot of bright girls do. But then she taught herself how to design, set up shop, and soon started to change the fashion world. In 1973, she created her own company, Comme des Garçons Co. Ltd in Tokyo and opened up her first boutique store in Tokyo in 1975. Starting with women’s clothes, Kawakubo added a men’s line in 1978. Comme des Garçons specializes in anti-fashion, austere, sometimes deconstructed garments.

Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-sewing), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.[2][3] Due to the high cost of each garment, haute couture makes little direct profit for the fashion houses, but is important for prestige and publicity.[4]
Born in Rome in 1890 to an aristocratic mother and an intellectual father, Schiaparelli soon rebelled against the conventional life of the upper classes. Her desire for exploration and experimentation landed her in hot water as a teen, when she published a book of poems with decidedly sensual overtones. Her work deeply offended her parents, who punished her by placing her in a convent. Schiaparelli was so determined to escape from the nunnery that she initiated a hunger strike which resulted in her release. By her early twenties she had fled to London, where she could live under less scrutiny. Later, during a foray in New York, she joined with artist friends and they all made their way to Paris…

Considered by many one of the greatest tailors of the century, Pierre Balmain was born in Saint Jean de Maurienne, France in 1914. After studying at the school of Architecture, in Paris he founded in 1945 the Maison Balmain as a couture house, with a lucrative sideline in fragrances. In that year he showed long, bellshaped skirts with small waists; a line that became popular in 1947 as part of Dior’s New Look.
Not only have the buyers found plenty of love for it, but the numbers don't lie: Designers wholeheartedly embraced the shade, with Edited's data showing that Pantone shade 11-0618 were particularly popular. It's technically called "wax yellow" and Edited explained it as a toned-down soft banana shade that has "adopted a more mature aesthetic." I don't know about you, but I'm suddenly hungry.
Donatella started to work for her brother Gianni in the late 1970s, serving as his muse and adviser. Then she became the designer for the company’s Versus line in the 1980s. After her brother was murdered, in 1997, she became creative director of the Versace Group. Donatella made sure that Versace shops would be on different fashion centers around the world, particularly Milan and New York. Top celebrities like Jennifer Lopez and Madonna have endorsed the company’s collection of clothes, accessories, fragrances and home furnishings.
"Butter-yellow hues offered a fresh new palette for the season, with brands incorporating head-to-toe looks in the shade across tailoring, eveningwear and outerwear, from Max Mara's layering look to Jil Sander’s knitted styles," says Tiffany Hsu, fashion buying director at Mytheresa. "I loved Jaquemus's power suit, which is a great workwear option worn with heels and one of his statement mini-bags. This color is the ideal alternative for minimalists—an alternative to classic black and beige hues, it lifts an outfit without being overly colorful."
Another India’s old hand and expert designer, from New-Delhi and designs both for men and women! His outfits are worn by Bollywood-actresses and has been in the field since 1980’s. He was given a title of “India’s-Master-Of-Fabric-And-Fantasy”, in 1996 by Time magazine. He has quite perfect sense of creativity & each of his invention is crafed to excellence. He did his graduation from St. Stephen College of NewDelhi with a first class(hons.) degree in history and created his first traditional line for men back in 1990. His client celebrities include Pamela Anderson, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Cambell, Anna Koirnikova nd Uma Thurman and most of his fashion-shows are done in Singapore, NewYork, India and Paris and also is the brand-ambassador of Omega-watches since 2001.
The Italian-born Frenchman is lauded for his 20th century pieces that looked as though they were from the 25th century. As Cardin rose to fame in the age of the space race, his creations took on an air of futurism. His so-called bubble dresses had all the fixings of science fiction, combining earthly elegance with out-of-this-world colors and avant garde design. They may be wacky, sure, but Cardin’s clothes showed a freedom of expression that highlighted larger ideals, in particular the emancipation of women. The visionary designer fell out of critical favor when he attached his name to less fashionable items, from cars to umbrellas, but his futuristic, space-centric legacy will live to infinity and beyond.
"A/W is always a moment for incredible outerwear, and this season it was no exception. For the most part, it was the bigger the better; oversized shapes, duvet dressing, blanket capes and more," says Elizabeth von der Goltz, Net-a-Porter global buying director. "Oversized cannot be mentioned without talking to the trench coat and the bigger the better with billowing sleeves at JW Anderson, cape draping at Burberry and classic maxi coats at Khaite. Big coats marked the opening of the Max Mara runway in blue, yellow and teal. Hot pink was the favourite at Jacquemus and Valentino, whose oversized silhouettes gave this typically feminine colour a masculine twist. And last but not least is the puffa jacket, which received an elegant update with a new reference to duvet dressing. Padding, quilting, floral embroidery and organza layering came from the likes of Margiela, Dries Van Noten and Toteme."
Born in January of 1905, this French designer was best known for his distinctive “New Look” silhouette. First shown in 1947; his suits and dresses revolutionized the way women dressed after the Second World War. Today, talented designer John Galliano carries on the legendary designer’s legacy in Paris, where he creates dramatic couture ball gowns, chic prêt-a-porter, and luxurious accessories for Dior. Galliano’s talent and his over-the-top runway shows have ensured that the brand remains strong and viable in today’s world…
Known for his stunning couture designs and his sophisticated women’s tuxedo jackets (known as le smoking), Saint Laurent was destined to carve out his own identity, but his career was not without its challenges. After a poorly received collection at Dior, which featured hobble skirts and other unusual designs, he was sent into mandatory military service. The stress of being in the army (although he lasted only 20 days) took a tremendous toll on the sensitive designer. He suffered from teasing and hazing by his fellow soldiers, and he soon plunged into a nervous breakdown; he was sent to a mental hospital for treatment.
Christian Louboutin was born in France in 1963. He was expelled from school at age 16 and started working for the brilliant shoe designer Charles Jourdan two years later. In the early 1990s, Louboutin launched his own line of women’s shoes. He added his legendary red soles in 1993. The Louboutin brand is one of our favorites and his wonderful and unique shoes are all we want.
Edited's data plays into the trend too. The analysts saw a rise in ultra-feminine themes with floral patterns being particularly key. Out of the total floral-print offering, 40% of the items were dresses in both the UK and the U.S. Some of our personal favourites? Paco Rabanne (especially when paired with a cute cardigan), Prada (so many different, weird and wonderful takes on a very classic idea) and Richard Quinn (literally every editor cried at his show because the jaw-dropping dresses combined with live music from Freya Ridings was just too much beauty to handle).
Very interesting list but I am surprised that Paul Poriet is not on this list. He revolutionized and created the modern fashion industry. Although in the end he could not survive in the industry he created his impact is huge. He was the first in many areas including freeing woman from corsets, using live models, creating a signature perfume, making an entire lifestyle brand, and modern marketing.
When you hear ‘casual’, you probably think ‘frumpy’; and the casual fashion style could really be ANYTHING but frumpy! Women who indulge in the casual fashion style don’t grab the exotic and bold items off the shelves. They would much rather prefer a simple white tee and a pair of black pants with a coordinating and trendy purse. The entire look is very modern and uncluttered with an extra touch of subtle elegance.
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