A-line has been administering the design world for quite a while, and it is certainly on the ascent, particularly for the resort season. It looks best when brandished with a touch of the 70s for somewhat of a bend. A fun loving blend of manly coats with modernized flower prints or beautiful crisscrosses, trimmed cuts, and high-waisted flared fits or straight-leg pants worn with mentors, can leave no uncertainty. A-line jumpsuits, and dresses, or skirts with weaving, matched with shirts or sews, are ladylike, thus 2019!
Yamamoto was born in Yokohama, Japan on October 3, 1943. He studied law at Keio University and graduated in 1966 with a law degree. He continued his studies on fashion design at the famous Bunkafukuso Gakuin, a fashion institute in Tokyo. Yamamoto blends the exotic and powerful designs of traditional Japanese dress with Western daywear, and achieves a unique, abstract style.  He is an uncompromising, nontraditional designer.  Yamamoto drapes and wraps the body in unstructured, loose, voluminous garments, similar in style and philosophy to those of Rei Kawakubo.  Many of his clothes have additional flaps, pockets and straps.
In the 80’s, Ralph Lauren really became a force to be reckoned with, as his signature polo shirts for men, with their ubiquitous polo pony and rider, became coveted items for many different demographics. Available in every color of the rainbow, they lined his coffers and allowed him to put more money into his glamorous women’s wear lines; he especially enjoyed producing couture pieces and overseeing glossy runway shows.
London designer Mary Quant was not only an iconic fashion design but also the imortal creator of the miniskirt. Mary had an art-school background and had been designing and manufacturing her own clothes since second half of the twentieth century. She was convinced that fashion needed to be affordable to be accessible to the young, she opened her own retail boutique, Bazaar, on the Kings Road in 1955, introducing the “mod” era and the “Chelsea look.”
If there could be such a thing as Big Dress Energy, the A/W 19 runways were absolutely chock-full of it. Avant garde eveningwear has become a focus for many brands, both those known for their elaborate after-dark looks (say, Rodarte) and those who are usually more casual (Y/Project). It's all about volume, drama, embellishment, rich colours, and as much satin and tulle as you can get your hands on. Sure, the hyped-up and hugely Instagrammable frilled dress explosions created by Tomo Koizumo won't literally slide effortlessly into your wardrobe, but the mantra of more is more will definitely influence the party season. 
"The footwear update this season is the square toe; from By Far to Gianvito Rossi’s two-tone boot to neutral hues at Neous and Bottega Veneta's mule," says von der Goltz. "Wandler’s new footwear line has landed already, with the square toe a key signature detail across all styles." Add that to the fact that everyone's already wearing the trend at Paris Fashion Week and you've got yourself a very big trend in the making.
“Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury.” No quote could be more appropriate from the woman who gave us the little black dress. Born August 19, 1883, in Saumur, France, Coco Chanel is famous for her timeless designs, trademark suits, and little black dresses. Chanel had a brief career as a singer before opening her first clothes shop in 1910. In the 1920s, she launched her first perfume and introduced the Chanel suit and the little black dress.

In the Seventies, Halston befriended (and dressed) members of the international jet set, including Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli, and Liz Taylor. Dressed in his trademark black turtleneck, he could often be found partying at Studio 54 and enjoying his success with a host of celebrity friends. Licensing deals made him very wealthy, but tragedy lay in the distance…drug addiction and an AIDS diagnosis in 1988 led to his downfall. Unable to cope with the demands of his career, he was fired from his own company…Halston died of AIDS-related complications in 1990.
Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.

In the 60’s, Valentino made a decision that would enhance his reputation; he sent Jacqueline Kennedy, the American First Lady and fashion icon, a series of his pieces to look over. She was enchanted with his designs, and even chose to wear one of his dresses when she married her second husband, Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis: her influence led to greater fame and fortune in North America.
Half-way garments are an alternative to ready-to-wear, "off-the-peg", or prêt-à-porter fashion. Half-way garments are intentionally unfinished pieces of clothing that encourages co-design between the "primary designer" of the garment, and what would usually be considered, the passive "consumer"[5]. This differs from ready-to-wear fashion, as the consumer is able to participate in the process of making and co-designing their clothing. During the Make{able} workshop, Hirscher and Niinimaki found that personal involvement in the garment-making process created a meaningful “narrative” for the user, which established a person-product attachment and increased the sentimental value of the final product.[5]
Fashion design collection is a range of garments, accessories or products that are designed and produced for sale to retailers or direct to the customer. It is grouped by theme, colour or fabrication, creating a strong fashion statement. This range of items may be inspired by trends and theme. Cultural and social influences are reflecting on design. Designs are usually done for the special occasion or season. Collection is a grouping of outfits that are present for catwalk, online web pages. For the wholesale market, the collection will be shown at trade shows or in-house events. For the general customer designer give their collections on press or magazine by attractive photographs.
Although many autumn colour trends abound (as you can see from the first section of this trend report), I kept noticing the exact pairing of red and pink together too—ideal when the two hues have been en vogue for such a long time now and you're likely to have them sitting somewhere in your closet. From dusky combinations at Anne Demeulemeester through to vibrant partners at Balenciaga, there are many ways this trend can play out. Over to you, pals.
Fashion design collection is a range of garments, accessories or products that are designed and produced for sale to retailers or direct to the customer. It is grouped by theme, colour or fabrication, creating a strong fashion statement. This range of items may be inspired by trends and theme. Cultural and social influences are reflecting on design. Designs are usually done for the special occasion or season. Collection is a grouping of outfits that are present for catwalk, online web pages. For the wholesale market, the collection will be shown at trade shows or in-house events. For the general customer designer give their collections on press or magazine by attractive photographs.
When all of the designs are completed and set out the financial parameters then range planning is required. A range plan is an overview of your total design collection like from how many styles you will have, to what fabrics and colour ways will be used. It is used before you start into large scale production. It is extremely useful for you to follow as a designer. But most importantly it gives buyers a clear conception of your vision.
I love Valentino, Tom Ford, Mary Quant, Yohi Yamamato and Donna Karen. I pull from these guys a lot for my cosplay. No, that isn’t sacrilege. Cosplay cannot be ignored as far as a money making design market goes. Top designs have trickled into cosplay and cosplay has trickled into top designs. There is just no way around it. Nor should there be. 🙂
A pattern maker (also referred as pattern master or pattern cutter) drafts the shapes and sizes of a garment's pieces. This may be done manually with paper and measuring tools or by using a CAD computer software program. Another method is to drape fabric directly onto a dress form. The resulting pattern pieces can be constructed to produce the intended design of the garment and required size. Formal training is usually required for working as a pattern marker.
Ralph  joined the fashion industry as a tie seller. He tried to introduce his own tie designs for the company, but his enthusiasm wasn’t perceived well. So, he left the company and launched his own mini-business: he sewed his first ties out of rags and distributed them to small shops. The most defining order of 100 dozens of ties by Neiman Marcus has radically changed Ralph’s life. He expanded his business by introducing menswear and womenswear lines. Currently his brand is worth $7.5 billion. Ralph Lauren’s success story inspires many novice designers. The first Polo logo was introduced in 1970.
The college look would be the tag most suitable for the preppy look. The collared T-Shirts are matched and A-line skirts are matched with girly blouses that are lined up in their wardrobe. A cute little headband and geeky glasses mostly do accompany with this style. The geeky look might seem to be an expensive style, but it is not required to shell out much to get this look as it is not that luxurious.
Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-sewing), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.[2][3] Due to the high cost of each garment, haute couture makes little direct profit for the fashion houses, but is important for prestige and publicity.[4]
These boys Abu-Jani and Sandeep Khosla, as a duo are legendary in the fashion-circuit and earned success, hype, fame and attention. They were the first and the foremost to exhibit their work at Harrods, the UK luxury store. Though they lack in pro training, yet their designs are exclusive, distinctive and remarkable. All the time, they travel to the distant and remote areas in quest of the hidden-styles that are yet to be exposed. This creative coalition exudes talent and attitude!
A prominent name in the Indian fashion-industry from the western-Indian region of Goa and is amongst the top ten India’s designers. He started as a catering graduate, later on moved to fashion-designing. He was the foremost Indian who was given invitation by IGEDO(World’s largest garment fair). He’s well-known for his passion for white and his modest chic style is a kinda rage among Indian-cloth lovers. In major Indian-news media, this multi-talented person has written exclusive features particularly for Goa Today, Apparel, columns for Femina and free-lance fashion journalism. He does the tasks of advertising styling, theater-designing and forecast portfolios. The ministry of culture , in 1994, exhibited his shiva temples compilation in Canton, Peking & Shanghai ,at the Festival of India. He’s eager at art-patron and puts forward the artists of Goa through special promotions at the Endell Rodricks Couture Salon. He did intern at the Fashion institute of technology , New York to learn how to preserve and conserve costumes.
It was during this period that many design houses began to hire artists to sketch or paint designs for garments. The images were shown to clients, which was much cheaper than producing an actual sample garment in the workroom. If the client liked their design, they ordered it and the resulting garment made money for the house. Thus, the tradition of designers sketching out garment designs instead of presenting completed garments on models to customers began as an economy.
The 70s fashion style can also easily be referred to as the ‘hippie’ look, where women leave their hair long and straight and add an adorable little flower or stem of flowers to create a natural finish. Their wardrobe will undoubtedly have the classic super-flared jeans and tons of tie-dye tops and accessories, as well as simple white tees to go with their look. Floral patterns are also common in this fashion style and makeup is minimal to maintain a simple and natural appearance.
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