London designer Mary Quant was not only an iconic fashion design but also the imortal creator of the miniskirt. Mary had an art-school background and had been designing and manufacturing her own clothes since second half of the twentieth century. She was convinced that fashion needed to be affordable to be accessible to the young, she opened her own retail boutique, Bazaar, on the Kings Road in 1955, introducing the “mod” era and the “Chelsea look.”

Very interesting list but I am surprised that Paul Poriet is not on this list. He revolutionized and created the modern fashion industry. Although in the end he could not survive in the industry he created his impact is huge. He was the first in many areas including freeing woman from corsets, using live models, creating a signature perfume, making an entire lifestyle brand, and modern marketing.
So many fashion houses have adopted certain features for clothing, which later on become their business cards. It seems simple at first sight, but looking into it, we realize that those are the characteristics that make those brands stand out. Examples of such can be the following: black and red lace in Dolce and Gabbana collections, expressive asymmetry in Antonio Berardi clothes and so on.
Gabrielle“Coco” Bonheur Chanel is probably the most reputable fashion designer of all time. She is a very exceptional, hard-working woman who has managed to found the famous Chanel brand. The key things she tries to convey in her designs are simplicity, practicality and elegance. Coco is one of the most influential figure of the 20th century. Her ideas are very modernistic and brave, and her models are still the benchmark in simplicity and elegance.
One of the inclining styles to pick from the spring/summer gathering this year is the shirt-dress. Long shirt, which hit the stands a couple of years back, has just turned into a work of art. In any case, this season, creators have reconsidered the shirt-dress with an assortment of characteristics and cuts. Drop midriffs, twofold high openings, business shirts, unbalanced hemlines, mandarin-neckline: be prepared to set out upon an enterprise, and try different things with any hope to coordinate your identity as you play with this design patterns for ladies.
Born in Rome in 1890 to an aristocratic mother and an intellectual father, Schiaparelli soon rebelled against the conventional life of the upper classes. Her desire for exploration and experimentation landed her in hot water as a teen, when she published a book of poems with decidedly sensual overtones. Her work deeply offended her parents, who punished her by placing her in a convent. Schiaparelli was so determined to escape from the nunnery that she initiated a hunger strike which resulted in her release. By her early twenties she had fled to London, where she could live under less scrutiny. Later, during a foray in New York, she joined with artist friends and they all made their way to Paris…
Like Halston, Calvin Klein epitomized disco glamour in the freewheeling late Seventies. His tight designer jeans, which clung to the sleek bodies of the greatest beauties of the day, including the young Brooke Shields, cemented his fame and made him millions of dollars. However, Calvin Klein’s reign continued well into the 80’s and 90’s – his spare, stripped-down designs offered a minimalist perspective that carried a very modern message. The use of sexuality in his ads was often a keystone of his success; his campaigns were designed to send overt messages and perhaps to shock. Today, his empire is still strong, despite some turbulence in the late nineties: his suits, dresses, and couture still offer a unique viewpoint.

Born in January of 1905, this French designer was best known for his distinctive “New Look” silhouette. First shown in 1947; his suits and dresses revolutionized the way women dressed after the Second World War. Today, talented designer John Galliano carries on the legendary designer’s legacy in Paris, where he creates dramatic couture ball gowns, chic prêt-a-porter, and luxurious accessories for Dior. Galliano’s talent and his over-the-top runway shows have ensured that the brand remains strong and viable in today’s world…
"Butter-yellow hues offered a fresh new palette for the season, with brands incorporating head-to-toe looks in the shade across tailoring, eveningwear and outerwear, from Max Mara's layering look to Jil Sander’s knitted styles," says Tiffany Hsu, fashion buying director at Mytheresa. "I loved Jaquemus's power suit, which is a great workwear option worn with heels and one of his statement mini-bags. This color is the ideal alternative for minimalists—an alternative to classic black and beige hues, it lifts an outfit without being overly colorful."
Edited's data plays into the trend too. The analysts saw a rise in ultra-feminine themes with floral patterns being particularly key. Out of the total floral-print offering, 40% of the items were dresses in both the UK and the U.S. Some of our personal favourites? Paco Rabanne (especially when paired with a cute cardigan), Prada (so many different, weird and wonderful takes on a very classic idea) and Richard Quinn (literally every editor cried at his show because the jaw-dropping dresses combined with live music from Freya Ridings was just too much beauty to handle).

The 66 years old diva, Donna Karan is one of the most influential fashion designers in the world. Her line of cloths was created for women to where when they are going to a cocktail party straight from work. Sleek and practical basics are mixed with glamorous and feminine pieces. To sum up, Donna Karan has left a lasting impact on the world of clothing, bringing uptown New York chic into the mainstream.


A vibrant fashion style is reserved for the lady who wants to say “Hey, look at ME, world!” This energetic and intense fashion style typically features garments with wild patterns and exaggerated embroidery as well as asymmetrical designs and tons of colors. Most of her wardrobe will be lined with super light and pastel colors that draw the attention of everyone’s eyes, no matter where it’s worn.
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