Automation (6) CAD (2) Calculation (1) Career (6) Clothing (11) Color (2) Color Fastness (1) Computer (4) Consumption (10) Costing (7) Cutting (5) Cutting Machine (3) Defects (13) Denim (9) Dyeing (12) Dyes and Chemicals (2) ERP (3) Fabric (2) Fashion (8) Fashion Accessories (11) Fashion Design (9) Fashion Industry (5) Fashion Merchandising (2) Fashion Trends (2) Fiber (8) Finishing Machine (3) Garment Accessories (9) Garment Finishing (14) Garment Industry (19) Garment Wash (8) Garments Production (22) GSM (2) IE (26) Inspection (9) Knitting (8) Knitting Machine (4) Loom (2) Marker (3) Mercerizing (1) Merchandising (15) Needle (1) Pattern (8) Planning (12) Pretreatment (5) Printing (10) Printing Machine (1) Quality Control (19) Sample (3) Seamless Garment (1) Sewing (12) Sewing Machine (6) Sewing Thread (2) Smart Textiles (1) Special Garments (1) Spinning (3) Tailoring (1) Technical Textile (7) Testing Machine (2) Textile Book (1) Textile Design (2) Textile Finishing (3) Textile Industry (8) Textile Recycling (1) Textile Testing (4) Top 10 (10) Undergarment (3) Visual Merchandising (6) Weaving (2) Wool (2) Yarn (9) Yarn Count (4)
Ralph  joined the fashion industry as a tie seller. He tried to introduce his own tie designs for the company, but his enthusiasm wasn’t perceived well. So, he left the company and launched his own mini-business: he sewed his first ties out of rags and distributed them to small shops. The most defining order of 100 dozens of ties by Neiman Marcus has radically changed Ralph’s life. He expanded his business by introducing menswear and womenswear lines. Currently his brand is worth $7.5 billion. Ralph Lauren’s success story inspires many novice designers. The first Polo logo was introduced in 1970.
One of the world’s most successful fashion designers, Diane von Fürstenberg impressed the fashion world when she introduced her now-iconic “wrap dress” for the working woman in 1972. Elegance, ease, and accessibility have always been the core of her design philosophy, which has allowed her to turn DVF into a global luxury lifestyle brand. In 2005, she became the recipient of the CFDA’s Lifetime Achievement Award.
Ralph  joined the fashion industry as a tie seller. He tried to introduce his own tie designs for the company, but his enthusiasm wasn’t perceived well. So, he left the company and launched his own mini-business: he sewed his first ties out of rags and distributed them to small shops. The most defining order of 100 dozens of ties by Neiman Marcus has radically changed Ralph’s life. He expanded his business by introducing menswear and womenswear lines. Currently his brand is worth $7.5 billion. Ralph Lauren’s success story inspires many novice designers. The first Polo logo was introduced in 1970.
Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.
A super adorable blast-from-the-past fashion style, the 50s look is all about bright and pastel colors (unless you’re doing a more ‘pinup’ theme, then you’ll wear black and red very often!) in adorable fashions, usually featuring an assortment of flowers and polka dots. Women will typically either wear a high ponytail or lovely curls with this fashion, and poodle skirts are an absolute must.
After working for Dior, Schiaparelli and Paquin, Pierre Cardin opened his fashion house in 1947. Initially designing costumes for stage productions, he launched his first women’s couture collection in 1953 and women’s ready-to-wear in 1959. Cardin’s company grew into an empire starting in the 1960s when he began licensing his name to a wide array of products outside of clothing.
The Italian-born Frenchman is lauded for his 20th century pieces that looked as though they were from the 25th century. As Cardin rose to fame in the age of the space race, his creations took on an air of futurism. His so-called bubble dresses had all the fixings of science fiction, combining earthly elegance with out-of-this-world colors and avant garde design. They may be wacky, sure, but Cardin’s clothes showed a freedom of expression that highlighted larger ideals, in particular the emancipation of women. The visionary designer fell out of critical favor when he attached his name to less fashionable items, from cars to umbrellas, but his futuristic, space-centric legacy will live to infinity and beyond.
Range planning includes the creation of the ratio of garments to be selected in any given collection. For example, a basic range plan may be formed of four skirts, three trousers, six tops, two jackets and two dresses in three colour ways. Every collection needs a breakdown of units (garments) to enable the looks to be worn with enough combinations. If more volume sales come from tops it makes knowledge to supply more of these when editing the collection.
Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.
×