The Daileigh’s Ashleigh Hutchinson offers articles and courses to help her readers build the perfect closet. She aims to help women aged 20-70 to create a style they love. Ashleigh includes quite a few fashion eBooks on her site, as well as blog posts and beautiful fashion photography. She even holds online webinars to help people improve their fashion sense.
1940s bathing suits 1948. Hollywood stars Cyd Charisse, Barbara Stanwyck and Jane Greer model the latest in 1940s swimsuits by top brands Jantzen and Mabs of Hollywood Beautiful 1940s Bathing Suit Styles to Inspire Marie McDonald has measurements which Hollywood producers, artists and at least one professor of anatomy and physical anthropology rate ideal. Here she sports a Caltex bathing…

Gabi Gregg set off on this journey to tackle the infuriating gap for plus size women. She started off a blog about a decade ago to show and pave a path in a way that promotes body positivity while being impeccably stylish, vibrant, and colorful. Her outfits are full of life just like her, and so is her clothing line Premme, which caters to plus sizes. She brought, what she calls ‘the fatkini’, by collaborating with ‘Playful Promises’ and ‘Swimsuits’, and showed us how it’s done. We need more women like her, and thanks to social media, we get to follow her around.
Plain curl perms (often referred to as ‘spot perms’) focus on curling a specific section of hair. They’re used generally to help achieve a certain style, for example curling only the ends or midsection of your hair. With plain curl perms, you can choose to either have tight or loose curls. The result tends to be natural looking waves depending on where you choose to have permed.
Art is subjective. By extension, fashion illustration is subjective. What makes something “good” will depend on the project, client, designer, and viewer. The needs of one piece may not fulfill the needs of another. That said, however, I still like to ask the opinions of illustrators on what they think makes for good work or what they look for in their own work to find satisfaction. Below are some fantastic answers for what could make a good fashion illustration:
“Each girl’s wardrobe should contain an extra dress or two which can be worn to meals. At breakfast and lunch, the girls will of necessity wear the dresses they wear to class. At dinner time they should change into something different. They will find themselves fresher in appearance and will be more sociable if they take time to change clothes before the evening meal.” (Textiles and Clothing / by Elizabeth Sage.)
It’s not true that women threw away their corsets during the 1920s. They didn’t need to make themselves some tiny waists and jutting bosoms, but anyone in possession of any kind of bosom or bottom needed to do the opposite and flatten them right out. So, elasticated corsets were created to do just that, and mould the body to the desired tube shape. Theses foundation garments also existed separately, so in 1920s fashion, a flattening bra and/or hip and bottom reducing girdle could be worn. Sometimes these were worn directly against bare skin, or sometimes on top of the traditional chemise, a loose fitting shift in cotton or silk used as a base to prevent chafing.
From the beginning of the century, modern art shocked the world: cubism, fauvism, futurism, constructivism and the Weiner Werkstatte suggested a different kind of aesthetics that was radically simplified which not only affected pictures on walls but fashion, too. A lot of modern artists worked with fashion houses to design clothes and some, such as the Futurists, directly mentioned clothing in their manifestos. This had quite an influence of female dress, which moved towards a straighter, less complicated silhouette.

As for purses women didn’t have much to carry so they were very small by today’s standards. Regular items were purchased on account, which the man paid, so you didn’t need to carry money. Purses were used for makeup, a handkerchief, and a few coins for the bus or movies. Some carried a flask in them. Some had built in makeup compacts. Many carried your cigarettes and cigarette holder. They were mostly an evening item but leather tooled bags were common for day wear. If a woman needed to shop she would bring a larger fabric bag to carry her items home. That probably was what Margaret was doing with hers? I need to rewatch Boardwalk and pay more attention to the ladies.
College men wore looser suits, often without jackets- just a pair of pants, shirt, tie, belt and maybe a vest. Hats were optional as well. Raccoon coats were not. Whatever the trendy fashion of the year was college kids had to wear it. They also had to wear college colors in a scarf, a pocket square, bag, hat band, pin or ring.  School spirit was vital to the dress code.
While many coats were long, stretching below the knee, a shorter coat was also in fashion. Short sport jacquettes were quite popular for their convenience and functionality. Coney fur in a natural tan shade, or dyed in silverine shade (silver/gray blended with dark markings) was a popular choice for this coat. Another popular shade was called Muskratine, which was dyed in a tan shade with brown markings to closely resemble the natural muskrat.
Dressing in vintage style clothing for a themed event or personal fashion is our passion. We turned a hobby into this website to make it easy to find vintage inspired clothing for women and men online spanning 1900-1960s. Our fashion history blog helps you create the look from decades past using vintage, vintage inspired and thrifty clothing, Need help? Ask us anytime.

1940s bathing suits 1948. Hollywood stars Cyd Charisse, Barbara Stanwyck and Jane Greer model the latest in 1940s swimsuits by top brands Jantzen and Mabs of Hollywood Beautiful 1940s Bathing Suit Styles to Inspire Marie McDonald has measurements which Hollywood producers, artists and at least one professor of anatomy and physical anthropology rate ideal. Here she sports a Caltex bathing…


A higher hemline became desirable but not all clothes during the roaring twenties were short, dresses and coats, for the most part were calf length for most of the 1920s era. The one good thing about the flapper dress was that it was such a simple construction that even if you couldn’t afford to go out and buy one, you could make one yourself at home with a bit of imaginative dressmaking skill.
One popular style was the buckle pump. Made over a stylish medium round toe in black patent leather, the shoe had an antique silver finished buckle, which concealed an elastic gore, making adjustment easy. A dressier look would be the stunning loop strap, that was made from Autumn Brown mesh leather trimming on the vamp and quarter. The light-colored leather quarter was carefully made not to soil hosiery and they had a spike heel.
“Each girl’s wardrobe should contain an extra dress or two which can be worn to meals. At breakfast and lunch, the girls will of necessity wear the dresses they wear to class. At dinner time they should change into something different. They will find themselves fresher in appearance and will be more sociable if they take time to change clothes before the evening meal.” (Textiles and Clothing / by Elizabeth Sage.)
Traveling in the 1920s was a dirty affair. Cars were dusty, trains were hot and buses were so packed with people that people were bound to be a wrinkled mess by the time they arrived at their destination. For those reasons, 1920s traveling clothes, for both men and women, were simple suits, a sturdy overcoat, comfortable hat, leather gloves, leather purse or luggage, and low profile shoes. Colors were drab grey, brown and blue that showed the least amount of dirt possible. Materials that wrinkled, like linen and cotton, were avoided, and instead knit, wool or sturdy cotton blends were preferred.
Arty as the names suggest, invokes the independent creativity of the person. These are usually the ones who want to make a statement of their own by the clothes they wear. Most of the times, they are the creators of their own fashion style. They do not follow the traditional norms and make the path for themselves. The unconventional for of art leads to innovating very many interesting forms of trends which are not restricted by the usual textbook nature of creating fashion.
Are you ready to embrace your dark side? If so, make like the street style stars of Spring/Summer 2019 Fashion Month and try a neo-gothic look. To wear the trend, follow their lead and pair an all-over black ensemble with on-trend pieces. Essentially, you can wear what you like, but remember to keep the overall vibe dark and moody with a chic twist. Also, consider adding a dark red lip for a sexy touch.
A higher hemline became desirable but not all clothes during the roaring twenties were short, dresses and coats, for the most part were calf length for most of the 1920s era. The one good thing about the flapper dress was that it was such a simple construction that even if you couldn’t afford to go out and buy one, you could make one yourself at home with a bit of imaginative dressmaking skill.
Athleisure is the trend that keeps giving, and its latest offering is as unexpected as it is stylish. The bike shorts were worn with blazers by many style-savvy showgoers this fashion month. Offering a fresh blend of sportswear and tailoring, the look was both striking and chic. Of course, while it may not be appropriate for either the office or the gym, the outfit is perfect for strutting the streets or attending Sunday brunch with your best friends. So, don’t be afraid to try it for yourself.
The 20’s was a dynamic decade and in fashion trends we find a range of contemporary currents and expressions reflected; everything from jazz and Art Deco to archaeological finds in the Orient and above all – social change.  Particularly women’s fashion underwent drastic changes as garments were now designed to allow their bodies to move freely, drive vehicles, play sports or dance the night away. The ideal figure turned straight, with no emphasis on either bust, waist or hips and the extreme figure shaping corsets were finally abandoned. Skirts exposed more of the legs than ever before – for a short period even the knee caps!
Paris was still the centre of fashion in the 1920s. If a dress didn’t come from Paris or wasn’t a copy of something that came from Paris, it simply wasn’t fashionable. But the good news: Paris was really into the simplified silhouette. So simplified that “sack” was a word regularly interchanged for “dress” – some frocks consisted literally of only two pieces, front and back with arm and neck holes. This could easily be made on the mass market or even by the home sewer. Sewing machines were becoming more affordable and most middle class households had them by now. A dress as simple as this could even be hand sewn fairly quickly and easily. It meant that 1920s fashion could be followed by the middle and working classes – quite a revolution.
The best fashion blogs don't just give you incredible style advice—they give you inspiration. Fashion blogs engage you in interesting content and provide new ideas on the subject of fashion and the surrounding creative world. Sure, everyone wants great outfit ideas for their saved Instagram section and dream wardrobes, but fashion isn't just about looking perfect. It can be an expression of who you are and how you want to represent yourself in the world. Now, if that's a little too deep for you, fear not. Our roundup of the best fashion blogs is a mix of serious and lighthearted takes on style.
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