Plain curl perms (often referred to as ‘spot perms’) focus on curling a specific section of hair. They’re used generally to help achieve a certain style, for example curling only the ends or midsection of your hair. With plain curl perms, you can choose to either have tight or loose curls. The result tends to be natural looking waves depending on where you choose to have permed.
Whether drawing for a magazine's fashion spread or creating ads, posters and brochures to generate consumer excitement for a new line of clothing, the fashion illustrator must clearly communicate fashion concepts through artistic means. The fashion artist may be called upon to draw the human figure in illustrations associated with the fashion industry. Illustrators may apply different drawing and illustrating techniques to express fashion designs in detail, including colors and fabric textures. They might use realistic representations or more abstract sketches. Some jobs require specializations; an October 2011 search for fashion illustrator jobs at CareerBuilder.com yielded postings seeking illustrators to develop eyewear sketches and shoe illustrations.
The Chriselle Factor on Youtube has close to 29 million views, and over half a million subscribers, which is why she is undeniably the biggest fashion blogger and expert there is. Even though she has been associated with big names in the fashion industry, she started the blog as a journal to share her personal style and musings, and she turned into a Youtube content creator to educate, share, and inspire women.
A very chic and youthful looking hat could be close-fitting with a fashionable pieced crown pulled softly to the back. The narrow off-the-face brim was finished with rows of stitching. The smart ostrich fancy on the side was of two shades and finished with grosgrain ribbon. Other styles might feature a high crown fashioned of velvet with an off-the-face flange that was outlined with dainty plush flowers. The band and flange facing was made of silk satin.
Would you rock this on a night out? I did this easy pink cut crease a while ago with my @sleekmakeup palette. Don't mind me, trying to get my #beyonce on 🙌🏾👀🤣 yasss! #makeuptutorial #makeup #makeuplover #makeupjunkie #makeupart #makeupph #makeupporn #makeupbyme #makeuplook #pink #eyemakeup #sleekmakeup #makeupmurah #makeupmafia #makeupdolls #mua #lashes #lipstick #lips #fbf #f4f #lookbeauty #ilovemakeup #beautyblogger @universalhairandmakeup @makeuptutorialsx0x @make4glam_ @fakeuproom @fakeupfix
Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.

Everyone else wore the quality of suit they could afford. Usually, a man had 3 or 4 suits he would wear during the week, changing shirts daily. Business suits were purchased with an extra set of pants since they wore out quicker than suit coats and vests. Dress shirts were striped with white round or pointed collars that were detachable up until the late 1920s. Cufflinks were also necessary. Learn more about men’s shirts here. 
Hailing from Finland and now living in London (although she travels tonnes), Sandra Hagelstam named her blog after her lifetime love affair with super high stilettos. The blonde beauty doesn’t just showcase shoes though, and her blog is an aspirational lesson in glamourous Scandi dressing. Favouring neutrals, feminine shapes and of course high heels, Sandra mixes up her personal style posts with diaries of her travels and her latest beauty finds.
A romantic silhouette with full skirt and high waist was still in fashion in the roaring twenties, but the period was increasingly seen as the period of the knee length straight dress. Sport clothes had an impact on fashion too, as more women as well as men took part in outdoor sports. Cloche hats, dropped hems, and bobbed hair were all the rage with dancing too, the Charleston and Black Bottom were fashionable dances of the time. Party dresses were often adorned with rhinestones or real diamonds, shimmering fringes, tiaras and bandeaus. Knitwear for day-wear became popular with cardigans and tunics being the thing to be seen in.
Shoes and accessories were more dramatic, too. Shoes would be pumps or strap heels in a medium or high height. Stockings would be sheerer and in colors to match the dress. Gloves would also match or be white (and were taken off to eat).  A hat would be whatever is most becoming to the dress, such as a feather trim sun hat or decorative cloche. Learn more about dressing in afternoon party dresses. 
And More… Really fashion illustration is almost any illustration whose focus is on fashion, accessories, and related media. Rather than telling a story about the illustration subject, fashion illustration tells stories about clothing, handbags, shoes, jewelry, and more. Almost anything that calls for illustrated work could contain fashion illustration, and specializing in this sort of design work makes for a broad range of client possibilities.

Men’s formalwear entailed a black tuxedo with tails or the new style of dinner jacket (now called a tuxedo coat). A white button-down dress shirt with wingtip collar and white or black bow tie was worn under a white or black U-shape vest. Wearing white was the most formal look, while black was for most semi-formal occasions. Black patent leather shoes and a top hat completed the formality. Young men who did not have the means of purchasing a tuxedo were acceptable in their best suit. The old guard didn’t like this much, but establishments like the opera and theater had to lighten the rules otherwise the young men could not afford it and the art form would die. The white dinner jacket over black pants wasn’t worn until the 1930s.
Surprisingly, wearing Sunday’s best was not part of the ’20s culture unless a woman was poor and only had one nice outfit– then, certainly, she MUST wear that to church. Otherwise, whatever she wore for streetwear she also wore to church as long as it was modest with long sleeves and a below the knee hemline. If a sleeveless dress was worn a light shawl, wrap or jacket acted as a light coverup. Simple, non-distracting clothing was appreciated in church. Women were required to wear a hat, gloves and matching purse. These three accessories polished her look and gave her permission to add personality to an otherwise conservative dress. Shop 20s dresses. 
Savage Beauty, Independent Kostym and Min Boudoir Magazine did a collaboration that covered the look of the 1920’s until the 1950’s. It was published a few months back in “Min Boudoir # 5”. If you are interested in the retro, burlesque, vintage fashion and lifestyle of this era, this is a good magazine to pick up. I did all the make up and shot all the photos for this project. My sister Amanda Martinez was in charge of the costume styling to get the perfect and accurate look of the decade. Here is the english and un-edited version, showing more pictures from our project. Next week we will cover the 1930’s!

Ling agrees. “Illustration has always been outside the contemporary art structure,” he says. “Some call it second rate and of course there is validity to that in some cases - but the art industry has long been a construct of vested interests so talent hasn’t always necessarily been able to get through. Now Instagram is democratising art, but it's also populist - and in that context people have had careers they wouldn't have otherwise had. But there is no doubt it’s working for the audience - people are certainly buying more and illustrators tend to work with designers on collaborations which photographers rarely do. There’s just an additional collectible appeal.”


Why you should follow: Marissa Cox not only writes Rue Rodier, she's also one of Who What Wear's columnists, so you know we really rate her style. The fashionable Brit moved to Paris in 2013 but had to change up her style to match her chic new city. As a result, she's got some brilliant learnings to dish out when it comes to dressing French. Merci, indeed. 
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