Fashion illustrators, also known as fashion design artists, are specialized illustrators who focus on expressing fashion designs and ideas through art. They must be familiar with computer design software and usually hold bachelor's degrees in graphic design or a relevant field. Fashion illustrators can work for many types of employers, including publications and fashion manufacturers. Many are freelancers and work on contract.

A mother-of-four, Downie clearly has a knack for “accidental” success having initially touched upon the fashion scene via a short stint making jewellery at her kitchen table which was selling at hip Covent Garden store Koh Samui in the late Nineties - before “one day I was cooking fishfinger sandwiches and [Net-A-Porter.com founder] Natalie Massenet calls up to ask if she can buy some for this new online thing she was doing”. Whether professionally trained or not, she’s keen that fashion illustrators are worthy of being called artists regardless of their status in relation to photographers. Certainly her own work is now bought by collectors all over the world at prices akin to fine art, regardless of what her subjects are depicted wearing. Citing the work of her Gucci collaborator Ignaci, as well as that of Kelly Brennan and Jill Button, “it crosses the line of design and fine art”, she says. “Whatever that umbrella term can be called. It shouldn’t be relegated to just fashion illustration.”
In the summer, men’s felt hats were tossed aside in favor of lighter straw hats. The straw boater and skimmer are what most of us think of as men’s ’20s hats. They had a round flat crown and striped ribbon that often represented a gentlemen’s club or college colors. The lightweight straw Panama hat was expensive but much nicer than other thick straw boater hats.  By the end of summer, straw hats were in shambles and thrown away. Learn more about men’s hat styles. 
Texture and Textile Types: Knowing how to illustrate different textile types goes hand-in-hand with understanding how clothing works. The viewer wants to know if a dress is made of silk or tweed. They are such different types of textiles that perhaps just the way they move over a figure may be enough. If, however, you’re trying to illustrate the difference between chiffon and organza, you’ll need to know how stiff or soft each fabric is, how textured it feels, whether it’s opaque or translucent, or which fabric is typically used for certain dress styles or occasions. Being able to communicate these details to the viewer without having to label them is a brilliant skill to have. Practice this by drawing swatches of fabric and studying various types as well as studying how other illustrators have tackled textures within their design work.

We are eternally grateful to Mademoiselle Coco Chanel for so many definitive 1920s fashion styles, and some of the greatest sartorial inventions; the little black dress, skirt suit, costume jewellery, espadrilles… But her greatest, most overarching influence? The liberation of women’s clothing and the concept of casual chic in the 1920s. Chanel led the trend for a flatter, corset-free bust, a streamlined silhouette with no hyper-waistline and she popularised trousers for women. Next time you let it all hang out after a huge dinner, you can thank this woman.
Larger hats were better at making the wearer the center of attention. The crown was effectively trimmed with tubular stitching and the semi-poke brim faced with taffeta. It was a hat so spectacular it had to be seen to be truly appreciated. The designer had used the velvet flower and grosgrain ribbon as well as band and bow ends. Hats like these were featured quite prominently in exclusive New York fashion shops, costing twice as much as most other hats.
3D / CGI RenderingAnimationBeautyBlack & WhiteBusinessCartoon & HumourCharacter DesignCollage & MontageComicCommunicationConceptualContemporaryDecorativeEducationalGIFsGraphicHistoricalIconInfographicInsta Influencers 10K +JewelleryLetteringLifestyleLive Event DrawingLooseMangaMapsMedicalNaturePaintingPaper ArtPastichePhotorealisticPlaces & LocationsPopRetouchingSatiricalSport & FitnessStoryboardStreet Art & MuralTechnicalTransportVectorWatercolourWood Engraving & Etching
Utilitarian designs appeared in all the major fashion cities throughout this fashion month. Of course, one particular style stood out from the pack. Originally designed as a one-piece protective garment for manual labour, boiler suits are now as fashionable as they are functional. To rock the look for yourself, just pick the cut and colour that suits you best. These long-sleeved jumpsuits are available in a variety of fantastic styles. So, you won’t be short on choices.
Back in the 80s, curls were 100% the hairstyle to have. Straighteners were out and curlers, crimpers and perms were everywhere. Girls loved their curls and why not? They brought volume, life and waves to their hair. Now, thirty years later, everything retro is back in fashion and women everywhere are realizing that the 80s rocked – especially when it came to fashion.
Jessica Wang is an Asian American blogger turned digital style expert from New York with a fan base of more than a million. Her design aesthetics are breathtaking, off-beat, and fulfilling, which is a terrific combination and precisely what fashion influencers need to be. From breaking stereotypes, challenging fashion trends, and merging high street fashion with luxury fashion, Jessica Wang is an influencer in the most real sense.
The Western World was seized with Egyptomania when King Tutankhamun’s tomb was discovered in 1922. The Egyptian King appeared to be dressed in pure gold sequins and had nets of faience beads spread over him. Immediately sequins and beading became all the rage, as well as Ancient Egyptian style emblems and pictograms (which often didn’t make sense). Even 1920s fashion illustrations were influenced, with models appearing in profile drawn in a flat style with a distinct black outline.
Sports clothes for men included a pair of pants or knickers called plus fours. These knee-length pants were paired with a patterned sweater or pullover vest and a long sleeve button down shirt with the sleeves rolled up. Argyle was a common sweater or vest print as well as a print for tall socks. Clashing colors were in style! An 8 panel cap (newsboy cap) was also worn and a pair of two-tone Oxfords or saddle shoes were snazzy.
Fashion blogs have been around since the early 2000s, but today, blogging is a whole new ball game. While fashion blogs are at an all-time high, we can’t argue against the fact that social media platforms like Instagram remain the single largest forum to redirect traffic towards fashion blogs. But we are not complaining, because that’s made our lives twice as easy. It’s a hashtag game out there, and that’s how we are neck deep into people’s profiles – engrossed, enamored, and even losing a few days while browsing one hashtag after another. Sometimes it can be overwhelming too, to see every second influencer with thousands of followers (and sometimes millions) and the stuff they have to offer. But some fashion bloggers manage to stand out despite all of it. And we are going to talk about them today. If fashion and being updated is your thing, you need to follow them! Check the list, below!

As we’ve already seen the First World War brought many changes to the lives of women and by the time the roaring twenties were in full swing, women were enjoying the new found freedom they’d been giving due to the economic changes. They smoked and drank – they drove cars and how they dressed changed radically, from the more demure look of the Edwardian period, came the shorter hemlines of the early to mid-1920s.


All in all the twenties were a popular time of increasing awareness of women’s rights, a more liberal attitude to fashion that stayed, with shorter knee length hemlines staying in vogue. It was a period that embraced a period of peace after one of the worst wars Great Britain had seen so far. The car became more popular, entertainment included going to the movies, radios were starting to make an appearance and some women had been given the vote.
The roaring twenties was a golden era of fashion.  WW1 left women desiring a simple, comfortable lifestyle and a fashion style that reflected the new modern age where young women outnumbered the older Edwardian generation. 1920s fashion was made for by the young and free spirited youth who discarded their corsets and showed off their … Read More about 1920s Women’s Fashion & Clothing Trends
And More… Really fashion illustration is almost any illustration whose focus is on fashion, accessories, and related media. Rather than telling a story about the illustration subject, fashion illustration tells stories about clothing, handbags, shoes, jewelry, and more. Almost anything that calls for illustrated work could contain fashion illustration, and specializing in this sort of design work makes for a broad range of client possibilities.
The hat is one accessory that women never left home without. There were hats for summer (woven straw, cotton) and winter (felt or hand sewn cloche hats). Hat trends included the tricorn when the Three Musketeers movie was popular, turban for fancy afternoons and evenings, the beret for the young lady, and a wide brim sun hat for garden parties. The most iconic hat was the cloche, meaning “bell” because it was shaped with a round crown and a small brim. Women often had to tilt their head back to see clearly while wearing a cloche. Hats had less decoration than they did in previous years but were still quite pretty with a bow, flower or art deco shape on one side.  Read more about women’s 1920s hats. 
The hat is one accessory that women never left home without. There were hats for summer (woven straw, cotton) and winter (felt or hand sewn cloche hats). Hat trends included the tricorn when the Three Musketeers movie was popular, turban for fancy afternoons and evenings, the beret for the young lady, and a wide brim sun hat for garden parties. The most iconic hat was the cloche, meaning “bell” because it was shaped with a round crown and a small brim. Women often had to tilt their head back to see clearly while wearing a cloche. Hats had less decoration than they did in previous years but were still quite pretty with a bow, flower or art deco shape on one side.  Read more about women’s 1920s hats. 

The Parisian fashion blogger and DIY queen Lisa Gachet started blogging a few years ago, and recently launched a brand that represents something she truly believes in – Do It Yourself Fashion. It’s a fascinating concept of making limited edition clothing that is a reflection of your personality, but affordable. Her brand is unique, and her feed is colorful. Follow her for all of it, and more.

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