1940s bathing suits 1948. Hollywood stars Cyd Charisse, Barbara Stanwyck and Jane Greer model the latest in 1940s swimsuits by top brands Jantzen and Mabs of Hollywood Beautiful 1940s Bathing Suit Styles to Inspire Marie McDonald has measurements which Hollywood producers, artists and at least one professor of anatomy and physical anthropology rate ideal. Here she sports a Caltex bathing…
Ultra Violet may be the Pantone Colour of the Year for 2018, but street style stars preferred a softer take on the trend this season. Rocking a range of shades from the lavender family, fashionistas proved that light purple is seriously stylish. Whether worn in the form of boots, dresses, coats or even head-to-toe ensembles, the flattering and feminine colour added a lovely touch to looks. Try it for yourself if you’re after something subtle yet exciting.
The Chriselle Factor on Youtube has close to 29 million views, and over half a million subscribers, which is why she is undeniably the biggest fashion blogger and expert there is. Even though she has been associated with big names in the fashion industry, she started the blog as a journal to share her personal style and musings, and she turned into a Youtube content creator to educate, share, and inspire women.

"If one door closes, another opens – don't be discouraged by a commission which falls through because there are plenty other opportunities waiting for you. If you already exchanged some emails with a client, there's still a chance that he'll remember about you the next time and/or will recommend you to other potential clients. Take it as a lesson of enduring such situation humbly." — Ewelina Dymek
Hats were not appropriate for evening wear unless it was a turban. Headbands, crowns, and hair combs were more appropriate. The purse, too, would have been of a formal nature being made of sequins, gold mesh, glittering beads or other colorful materials. It would have also been wise to wear a matching dress jacket, fringe evening shawl or fur wrap to a formal affair. Jewelry was minimal, perhaps a long bead or pearl necklace, rhinestone or feather headband , drop earrings and bracelet were optional. Accessories such as long gloves, a hand fan, fringe shawl or boa, cigarette holder and purse were also glamorous additions.

We are eternally grateful to Mademoiselle Coco Chanel for so many definitive 1920s fashion styles, and some of the greatest sartorial inventions; the little black dress, skirt suit, costume jewellery, espadrilles… But her greatest, most overarching influence? The liberation of women’s clothing and the concept of casual chic in the 1920s. Chanel led the trend for a flatter, corset-free bust, a streamlined silhouette with no hyper-waistline and she popularised trousers for women. Next time you let it all hang out after a huge dinner, you can thank this woman.
A woman’s most common social activity was having tea with friends (or a lunch for businessmen). Tea parties could be semi-formal or formal. A tea dress was an afternoon dress made of lighter, brighter materials and more trim. The afternoon dress was a thing of sophisticated beauty. White dresses worn in summer were very attractive while pastels or rich jewel tones offered variety in the other seasons.
So there you have it. Any other type of activity you might encounter was usually determined by the time of day and the indication of formality. So, next time you head to a daytime tea party you will know to wear an afternoon dress or, for men, a summer white suit. For Gatsby’s lavish affair bare your arms and party like it is the day before prohibition starts!
Men’s formalwear entailed a black tuxedo with tails or the new style of dinner jacket (now called a tuxedo coat). A white button-down dress shirt with wingtip collar and white or black bow tie was worn under a white or black U-shape vest. Wearing white was the most formal look, while black was for most semi-formal occasions. Black patent leather shoes and a top hat completed the formality. Young men who did not have the means of purchasing a tuxedo were acceptable in their best suit. The old guard didn’t like this much, but establishments like the opera and theater had to lighten the rules otherwise the young men could not afford it and the art form would die. The white dinner jacket over black pants wasn’t worn until the 1930s.
Why you should follow: High fashion can sometimes seem like it's out of reach. While the likes of Chanel and Gucci will always hold a place in our hearts (and most bloggers' closets), sometimes it's great to know how to shop without spending a fortune. Alex Stedman of The Frugality constantly proves that the high street offers incredible pieces that look super expensive (such as this jumper from M&S).
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