Chic is characterized by being trendy and fashionable. It is a type of statement to make oneself look smart and striking. Whoever follows this style makes sure to choose well tailored stylish designs that are pretty classy. Strong colors which are not extravagant, comes as a part of the chic style. It is something that relates to being casual in not so casual way. If you are part of this style, your wardrobe is a symbol of style.
Born Gabrielle“Coco” Bonheur Chanel, she is a excellent French fashion designer, founder of the well known Chanel brand, whose modernist thought, practical design, and pursuit of expensive simplicity made her an important and influential figure in 20th-century fashion. She was the only fashion designer to be named on Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century.
If there is one thing that is constant, it is “change”. And change is exactly the one thing that is constant when it comes to fashion. Since the beginning of human civilization, there has been a constant effort being put to make one look better. The different styles in fashion have always gone through innumerable changes. With the increase in the amount of innovations, the change in trend and fashion styles have also been rapid. So keeping that in mind, here is the list of a few fashion styles that we accepted with all our hearts:

But of course, women did not only wear dresses in 1920s fashion. They also favoured separates – skirts and a blouse, surmounted with a gently tailored jacket, long line or quite often a thick cardigan. The blouses ran the gamut from very simple to be-frilled, embroidered and with all kinds of fancy collars. They also, like dresses, came in many colours and prints.
Not everyone was a bright young thing in the 1920s, nor did they want to wear the latest fashion of drop waist dresses. Many mature women continued to wear the fashions of 10 years prior to the 1920s. This meant long, modest gowns, in dark rich fabrics. Tall lace up boots or strappy heels were more comfortable for women who grew up wearing them.  Hats were larger as well, not the helmet cloches of the roaring twenties.
As is common in these art career-focused articles, not all successful artists have a formal art education. Some of the artists I interviewed attended art schools, studying illustration or fine arts, or have taken art classes at some point. Others developed their skill set and work on their own or through years of working in various art and design related disciplines.
Danielle Bernstein’s ‘We Wore What’ has an interesting approach that focuses on style, fashion, and just that. You’d realize that her posts are often full angle shots, with barely close angle pictures, because she is someone who believes that she loves fashion, so everything else can take a backseat. She wants her followers to focus on her outfits, and we think it brings an excellent perspective to the table. With over a million followers that get a dose of her everyday outfits, she is an unstoppable force.

Men’s dress shoes consisted of lace-up cap toe, wingtip Oxford or derby shoes. The most dressy Oxford was the wingtip with a distinct W design on the toe. Most middle-class businessmen opted for the simple cap toe Oxford in brown or black or white nubuck in summer. Some old men continued to wear lace-up dress boots.  With snazzy new suit colors came the trend of two-tone Oxfords. Usually brown and white, they looked very dapper. Saddle shoes in brown and white were another casual shoe although a few came in black and white. Learn more about 1920s men’s shoe styles. 
This articles should help you with some ideas and pictures about plus size fashions: https://vintagedancer.com/1920s/1920s-plus-size-fashion-history/ A middle age woman would have worn the same fashions as the younger set but a little bit less fussy details. She would not wear ruffles and bright colors or “cute” prints. Solid colors, simple trim, and a shape that flattered her body were the only rules to follow.
"It’s usually paper and pencil with some watercolors, but I like to vary the types of paper. Sometimes I’ll do only pencil with just a splash of watercolor, and others just watercolor. I’ve been trying to draw with just the brush and watercolor, which is much harder because you don’t have as much control as you do with the pencil, but the result can be very interesting at times!" — Camila Gray, fashion illustrator
Some women did go without body shaping entirely, or might wear just a very loose silk “bra” (they were not called that at the time) or longer line vest with loose fitting French knickers which seem rather big to us but were extremely brief for the period. A combination teddy could also be worn. In winter, knitted wool jersey versions of these were much warmer. A slip or petticoat, and stockings in silk or rayon, with a garter if it wasn’t already attached to the other undergarments, completed the underwear.
It’s rather easy to describe the sporty fashion style: it’s sporty! Girls will typically wear some popular sport companies like Adidas or Nike and will always have runner shoes (or similar style shoes) on. They prefer a simple and subtle look that oozes ‘sports’, with plain colors like white, black, and gray being BIG hits. They won’t strive for anything fashionable or flashy and would prefer sweatpants, tight runner pants, and basic tees. Don’t forget the ponytail to finish it off!

Life Drawing: While many fashion illustrators have highly stylized work, the basic foundations of drawing figures from life and anatomy are necessary in order to create figures in a variety of poses, with and without reference, for most any project. No one says you have to be a master at life drawing. Rather, an understanding of the human form allows an artist to distort it as they see fit to create interesting and stylized figures that can fit a variety of projects and the needs of clients.
Eyes: A dark and dramatic look, with black smeared eyeliner liberally and heavily applied, topped with dark grey, green or turquoise eyeshadow to get the “smokey eyes” look. Emphasis lay in the middle of the eye to get a perfect round shape. White or off-white eyeliner inside the eye to enlarge optimally. Lots and lots of mascara! In those days mascara came in a block form and needed to be heated up and applied with a stick or wand. False eyelashes were popular!
“Photography has long been considered superior to illustration when it comes to selling magazines” says Downton. “But it’s like asking what an apple can do that a banana can’t. I think they have a symbiotic relationship. Illustration changes the pace of a magazine as you read it; and you project your own finish onto the story which gives a different sense of satisfaction to the reader.”
"Editorial jobs are the most exciting and challenging for me. The deadlines are very tight, and the subject matter tends to skew conceptual. Book jobs are rewarding but slow-burns. They require a lot of patience! Advertising campaigns are sometimes the most limiting because there can be a lot of red tape around a company's branding guidelines." — Bee Johnson, illustrator

Forget everything you ever believed about beige being boring; this neutral colour palette is the only one to be seen in this autumn. Best worn in multiple shades of the hue, loose tailoring is the way forward. Take the lead from designers such as Valentino, Burberry, Chloe, and Fendi and shop pieces now that you can layer when the weather gets colder.
She is the sister of Gianni Versace, and she has proven to be no lesser sibling. After the murder of Gianni in 1997, Donatella took over and has taken the Versace name to new heights. She made sure that Versace shops would cater to the different fashion centers around the world, particularly Milan and New York. Top celebrities like Jennifer Lopez and Madonna have endorsed the company’s collection of clothes, accessories, fragrances and home furnishings.
The above describes what we think of as the quintessential “1920s Flapper”. Interestingly, the word “Flapper” was originally used around that time to describe a girl of about 13-19 and only became the term for this kind of woman gradually following the 1920 film “The Flapper”, which follows the (mis)fortunes of a schoolgirl and her fall from grace.
I don’t know what style category I fit into. I seem to have casual, sexy, girly, punk and tomboy. I even like the sporty style. It actually depends on my mood but most of the time, I like romantic clothes with lace, chic stuff, and if I don’t feel like dressing up, I just want casual or tomboy. Usually with crop tops and high waisted jeans. What….am I???
Forget everything you ever believed about beige being boring; this neutral colour palette is the only one to be seen in this autumn. Best worn in multiple shades of the hue, loose tailoring is the way forward. Take the lead from designers such as Valentino, Burberry, Chloe, and Fendi and shop pieces now that you can layer when the weather gets colder.
Tiaras and diamond hair slides were also popular. They were designed to draw attention to the daring hairstyle. Shoes usually sported a kitten heel, nothing higher. For jewellery, as well as the hair decorations mentioned above, slave bangles, positioned above the elbow accentuated the bare arm, and a collection of bangles at the wrist also looked good. As well as this, ropes of pearls had been made fashionable by Chanel and dangly earrings were still in vogue.

“Fashion illustration can’t be retouched and there is certainly an appeal in that,” says Brett Croft, head of the Vogue House archive. “There is definitely a younger generation of illustrator coming through,” he adds. “It’s to do with Edward of course, but it’s also part of a movement towards more simple artforms which was very obvious at Frieze this year. Last year was all about video and this year there seemed to be a reaction away from that. I think there is an appeal in the fact it can’t be hyper real. It just is what it is - there’s a simplicity to it that is refreshing.”
Another influence the émigrés had been in bringing their traditional style of embroidery to Paris. Russian “peasant” embroidery appeared on extremely sophisticated outfits, and in some cases mingled with the traditions and motifs from many other countries. It was called “Oriental” but it encompassed designs from many countries. The Ballet Russe had widely introduced this fantasy style to Paris and the city was also fascinated by black jazz bands and the dancing of Josephine Baker. This admiration meant that black artists and culture also influenced the fashions of the time.

Vintage T-Shirts, ripped jeans and leather jacket – three words that describe the rocker look. It is one of the most versatile style of fashion which keeps changing depending on the genre of music, the band and the person who choose to wear it. Be it heavy metal giant Megadeth’s T-Shirt or grunge rockers Nirvana’s hoodie, the selection seems to be uncountable. There are no baggy apparels in this style. Most of the clothes chosen are a tad bit smaller in size. It all depends on the wearer and what music they love and support.
Now that I’ve told you about various perm types, it seems only fitting that I give you a few instructions on how to care for your new perm too. Firstly, do not – DO NOT – wash your hair for an absolute minimum of 24 hours after having your perm done. Doing so will deactivate the chemicals used to set your perm before your perm has had a chance to take hold and thus your hair will return to being exactly the same as it was before. If you don’t want your perm to be not only a waste of time but money too then this tip is a must!

Queen of pearls Anita, pictured below right with actresses Joan Crawford and Dorothy Sebastian for the film Our Dancing Daughters, reportedly received 35,000 fan letters in a week during her heyday. Remember folks, these were the times when fan-girls didn’t have Twitter or emojis to express their love for a star, so these were physical, hand-written notes of adoration. Amazing, right?


It’s not true that women threw away their corsets during the 1920s. They didn’t need to make themselves some tiny waists and jutting bosoms, but anyone in possession of any kind of bosom or bottom needed to do the opposite and flatten them right out. So, elasticated corsets were created to do just that, and mould the body to the desired tube shape. Theses foundation garments also existed separately, so in 1920s fashion, a flattening bra and/or hip and bottom reducing girdle could be worn. Sometimes these were worn directly against bare skin, or sometimes on top of the traditional chemise, a loose fitting shift in cotton or silk used as a base to prevent chafing.

I feel like there’s a lot of love in the vintage community for 20s style, but there’s a much higher barrier of entry to it than there is to, say, 1950s style. For starters, there’s just way less of it. A dress from 1926 would be 90 years old this year. Pieces from that decade are out there, but they’re rare, they’re fragile, and they’re really expensive, particularly if they’re in a really wearable condition. On top of that, the 20s never really came back the way that other decades have. You can find 30s inspired looks from the 90s, and 40s and 50s inspired styles from the 80s, but there wasn’t really a point where people were like “let’s dress like it’s the 20s again!” in a widespread way. Certain details popped up in other eras – beading, fringing, dropped waists – but, at least in my experience, it’s unusual to come across a dress from a later era that truly feels like a 20s piece.
If there is one thing that is constant, it is “change”. And change is exactly the one thing that is constant when it comes to fashion. Since the beginning of human civilization, there has been a constant effort being put to make one look better. The different styles in fashion have always gone through innumerable changes. With the increase in the amount of innovations, the change in trend and fashion styles have also been rapid. So keeping that in mind, here is the list of a few fashion styles that we accepted with all our hearts:
All in all the twenties were a popular time of increasing awareness of women’s rights, a more liberal attitude to fashion that stayed, with shorter knee length hemlines staying in vogue. It was a period that embraced a period of peace after one of the worst wars Great Britain had seen so far. The car became more popular, entertainment included going to the movies, radios were starting to make an appearance and some women had been given the vote.
"Getting exposure is not always easy, we are in a competitive industry, so you should build up a solid web presence. I consider having a clean, eye candy and updated professional life online is very important to get your work seen: website, blog, social networks, specialized sites such as Behance, or maybe a newsletter. I found Instagram the best social tool for fashion illustrators" — Cristina Alonso
After the excitement of The Hammersmith Vintage Fair, I like to pop into a fine public house such as The Salutation, right opposite the fair, for a little liquid sustenance. 🍷 Am wearing a 1920s balloon sleeved corded velvet coat and my bag is a 20s/30s knitting holder. #hammersmithvintagefair #vintagefashion #truevintageootd #vintagecoat #1920scoat #vintagebag #kingstreet #hammersmith
The silhouette at this time was a masculine one with flatter chests that were held down by specially made corsets. Bras weren’t about support as they are now, some were little more than camisoles, some women even went without bras in order to look more flat chested and breasts would therefore sit much lower down the chest wall as a result. Those with a more generous chest size would attempt to bandage their breasts down flat. The “Symington Side Lacer,” was a bra whose sole intention was to do just that. It was created so that both side could be pulled until the chest was flattened with lacing on both sides of the bra.
Everyone else wore the quality of suit they could afford. Usually, a man had 3 or 4 suits he would wear during the week, changing shirts daily. Business suits were purchased with an extra set of pants since they wore out quicker than suit coats and vests. Dress shirts were striped with white round or pointed collars that were detachable up until the late 1920s. Cufflinks were also necessary. Learn more about men’s shirts here. 
1918 was the last year of the first World War. With it began a change from war time austerity to freedom in dress and fit and color. Both women’s and men’s 1918 fashion were at a pivoting point, lasting until 1922 when the roaring twenties changed things again. For women, fashion was looser with shorter … Read More about Fashion in 1918 – Women and Men During WW1

Another influence the émigrés had been in bringing their traditional style of embroidery to Paris. Russian “peasant” embroidery appeared on extremely sophisticated outfits, and in some cases mingled with the traditions and motifs from many other countries. It was called “Oriental” but it encompassed designs from many countries. The Ballet Russe had widely introduced this fantasy style to Paris and the city was also fascinated by black jazz bands and the dancing of Josephine Baker. This admiration meant that black artists and culture also influenced the fashions of the time.

Forget everything you ever believed about beige being boring; this neutral colour palette is the only one to be seen in this autumn. Best worn in multiple shades of the hue, loose tailoring is the way forward. Take the lead from designers such as Valentino, Burberry, Chloe, and Fendi and shop pieces now that you can layer when the weather gets colder.
“Photography has long been considered superior to illustration when it comes to selling magazines” says Downton. “But it’s like asking what an apple can do that a banana can’t. I think they have a symbiotic relationship. Illustration changes the pace of a magazine as you read it; and you project your own finish onto the story which gives a different sense of satisfaction to the reader.”
Texture and Textile Types: Knowing how to illustrate different textile types goes hand-in-hand with understanding how clothing works. The viewer wants to know if a dress is made of silk or tweed. They are such different types of textiles that perhaps just the way they move over a figure may be enough. If, however, you’re trying to illustrate the difference between chiffon and organza, you’ll need to know how stiff or soft each fabric is, how textured it feels, whether it’s opaque or translucent, or which fabric is typically used for certain dress styles or occasions. Being able to communicate these details to the viewer without having to label them is a brilliant skill to have. Practice this by drawing swatches of fabric and studying various types as well as studying how other illustrators have tackled textures within their design work.
Notorious gangsters and bootleggers of the 1920s wore 3 piece suits, too.  What they wore was determined by their wealth, not their uh… occupation.  Some well-to-do gangsters were known for wearing white spats over their boots, just like men did in the early 1900s.  A walking cane or rolled umbrella was another accessory that said “old money”.  Younger gangsters (the muscle and weapon men) wore whatever suits they could afford. They often did not have matching vests, and they fit poorly since they were purchased second hand. Learn how to dress like a 1920s gangster here. 
Art is subjective. By extension, fashion illustration is subjective. What makes something “good” will depend on the project, client, designer, and viewer. The needs of one piece may not fulfill the needs of another. That said, however, I still like to ask the opinions of illustrators on what they think makes for good work or what they look for in their own work to find satisfaction. Below are some fantastic answers for what could make a good fashion illustration:
Beautiful Swimsuit Legs of the 1940’s Beautiful legs belonging to famous 1940’s Hollywood faces. Get a good legs workout before donning your favorite 1940’s swimsuits Summer with its bare-legged sun and fun clothes makes us suddenly conscious of our leg beauty, or the lack of it. We realize that for months we’ve devoted all of our care to our face,…
There is two main goals of the sexy fashion style: gain the attention of every male around you and show as much skin as legally and humanly possible. Sexy style is all about showing off your *best* features, those being your breasts, stomach, and legs. A woman whose fashion style is set to sexy is usually loaded with plenty of miniskirts, body-con dresses, high heels, and crop tops or low cut tops.
A tailored dress made of a silk blend crepe or wool was also appropriate. These dresses featured a natural waist sash in the early 20s that gradually moved down into a drop waist with a thin belt. Dresses fit loose and usually slipped on overhead. A small collar or wide open flat collar with a bow tie at the neck was essential to the 20s wardrobe. Details were added to the dress that elongated the body such as vertical pintucks, a row of buttons, and pleated skirts.

Dressing in vintage style clothing for a themed event or personal fashion is our passion. We turned a hobby into this website to make it easy to find vintage inspired clothing for women and men online spanning 1900-1960s. Our fashion history blog helps you create the look from decades past using vintage, vintage inspired and thrifty clothing, Need help? Ask us anytime.

The Parisian fashion blogger and DIY queen Lisa Gachet started blogging a few years ago, and recently launched a brand that represents something she truly believes in – Do It Yourself Fashion. It’s a fascinating concept of making limited edition clothing that is a reflection of your personality, but affordable. Her brand is unique, and her feed is colorful. Follow her for all of it, and more.
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