As illustration has emerged as a tool for cutting through the visual noise of social media, it has itself benefitted from social media’s own disruption of the traditional barometers of quality. Just as David Bowie prophesied in his famous 1999 Newsnight interview that the internet would demystify the relationship between artist and audience, social media has “smashed down the gatekeepers”, says Downie, who doesn’t consider a picture finished until it’s given a “moment of birth” by being published on her Instagram account. “I cried when I saw that Bowie interview,” she says. “It’s so profoundly right, and it’s exactly what happened with my work.”

Tanesha Awasthi’s blog is honest and relatable to women across the world because wherever we are from, insecurities and looking a certain way seem to be our lives’ biggest struggle. Her story from wanting to fit in to pursuing her passion for fashion doesn’t have to be typecasted after all. From owning up her body type to spreading body positivity, and mostly being fashionable, Tanesha is a real star, the kind we all need, the one in the most real sense. Follow her for tips, hacks, trends and everything in lifestyle, fashion, and beauty.
Whether drawing for a magazine's fashion spread or creating ads, posters and brochures to generate consumer excitement for a new line of clothing, the fashion illustrator must clearly communicate fashion concepts through artistic means. The fashion artist may be called upon to draw the human figure in illustrations associated with the fashion industry. Illustrators may apply different drawing and illustrating techniques to express fashion designs in detail, including colors and fabric textures. They might use realistic representations or more abstract sketches. Some jobs require specializations; an October 2011 search for fashion illustrator jobs at CareerBuilder.com yielded postings seeking illustrators to develop eyewear sketches and shoe illustrations.
Why you should follow: High fashion can sometimes seem like it's out of reach. While the likes of Chanel and Gucci will always hold a place in our hearts (and most bloggers' closets), sometimes it's great to know how to shop without spending a fortune. Alex Stedman of The Frugality constantly proves that the high street offers incredible pieces that look super expensive (such as this jumper from M&S).
Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.

A picture tells a thousand stories and considering the noise that surrounds the launch of every issue of Vogue - endless hashtags and chatter about the cover model, photographer and pose, it seems inconceivable that covers in the past featured fashion illustrations elaborating far more detailed stories. The romance of images by John Ward and Carl Erickson, surrealism of Dali and Benito, and art deco of Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Georges Barbier and Harriet Meserole spun tales of arctic explorers; tennis players; bridal marches; world travellers; golfers; race drivers, actresses, mothers and lovers. In the days before photography became fashion’s key documenter, fashion illustration was just as emotive and colourful - if not more so - as the images burned onto our retinas more recently by Penn, Bailey, Day, Meisel and Mert & Marcus. Call to mind the images created by Rene Gruau as Dior’s artistic director in 1947 - there is no doubt as to the part illustration used to play in fashion storytelling.
Back in the 80s, curls were 100% the hairstyle to have. Straighteners were out and curlers, crimpers and perms were everywhere. Girls loved their curls and why not? They brought volume, life and waves to their hair. Now, thirty years later, everything retro is back in fashion and women everywhere are realizing that the 80s rocked – especially when it came to fashion.
“It’s happening now because social media is so hungry for content, but there is so much cold content out there; so much straight product, which has very little emotional resonance with the audience” says Downie, who was discovered by Nick Knight a year after now-famously taking up painting at the age of 48, and now works with Alessandro Michele at Gucci. “Luxury brands have had to find a way to show their collections in a warm way.”
In the early 1920s, bows weren’t necessary prominent features on women’s coats, but by the mid twenties, Paris had cabled the world to let them know: bows are in. Depending on the budget, a woman would generally choose between wool velour and fur. A particularly nice coat might be made of all-wool Venise Bolivia, with a Paris bow and buckle that fastened in front of the left hip.
Ankle boots were still worn for practicality, as were sensible lace ups but the most fashionable shoes were kitten heeled t-bars or strap shoes (very useful for dancing) or low heeled court shoes. Fancy designs could come with several straps, and bows, buckles or artificial flowers were attached at the toe for decoration. The toe shape was predominantly pointed.
Ralph Lauren is worth $7.5 billion, and he got it all because of his fashion sense. In 1970, the first Polo logo was seen in Lauren’s line of women’s suits that was designed in the classic men’s style. Two years later, the famous short sleeve shirt with the Polo emblem appeared, and it soon became a classic. These shirts have been collected by men all over the world ever since. Lauren, on the other hand, has been collecting rare and classic cars. The collection is so unique that it has been featured in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.
It is all about showing off your best features. Let all the best things about your out there to get the attention of male. Mostly accompanied by heels, shorts or tight skirts, this style leaves the bare minimum for imagination. Exposure is to be at the maximum and as much as skin is shown. Tight fitting tops are chosen to show off the features like breasts and stomach. This is the type of fashion which is not every woman’s cup of tea. You got a lot of guts to pull off this one.
While as a medium it has been sidelined as old fashioned in comparison to the cutting edge that photography presented - made all the more thrilling by a Bailey-esque reputation for rebellion - in those days fashion illustration led the fashion press, inspiring new attitudes and breathing new life into past ones. In doing so it created a visual timeline of life since Vogue began. It never completely disappeared, but recently it has come back to explosive effect. Perhaps our first Vogue under editor Edward Enninful was such a marker in the sand of the new that it has generated a naturally concurrent upsurge in nostalgia; or perhaps, as technology erupts around us, we yearn for the quiet of a considered illustration, alive with the possibility of the artist's internal thoughts as much as with the potential of our own interpretation.
Folds and Drapery: Clothing is a big focus for fashion illustration. Really, it’s one of the main focuses, and what often makes fashion illustration successful (which is something we’ll discuss in depth below) is an attention to the way fabric moves on and around the figure wearing it. Often clothing can be used to illustrate a more dynamic pose or draw attention to an area within a composition. Having a good understanding of folds, drapery, how clothing hangs, and the limits of different kinds of textiles will allow you to use space and your design medium to your advantage when creating beautiful fashion illustrations.
Surprisingly, wearing Sunday’s best was not part of the ’20s culture unless a woman was poor and only had one nice outfit– then, certainly, she MUST wear that to church. Otherwise, whatever she wore for streetwear she also wore to church as long as it was modest with long sleeves and a below the knee hemline. If a sleeveless dress was worn a light shawl, wrap or jacket acted as a light coverup. Simple, non-distracting clothing was appreciated in church. Women were required to wear a hat, gloves and matching purse. These three accessories polished her look and gave her permission to add personality to an otherwise conservative dress. Shop 20s dresses. 
The second look was for more vigorous outdoor activities, such as hiking, riding, camping, and fishing. Instead of a skirt, women wore wool knickers also called plus fours, togs, breeks or jodphurs. They were wide and baggy around the hips with a button cuff below the knee. Women wore thick stockings or knee-high argyle socks with a pair of flat oxfords. A button down shirt with collar and a skinny black tie gave a nod to menswear. Knit vests, pullover sweaters, and long cardigans added warmth. Men did not appreciate this masculine look but young adventurous women loved it.
Those college kids get to have all the fun fashions. Being away from parents (who do their laundry) and in a fashion-forward subculture, college kids wore sportier clothing, such as knit dresses, knee length knit suits, knit sweaters, knit vests, knit socks, knits gloves… knit knit knit! They were easy to wash. Cotton, linen, silk and rayon dresses, too, but knitwear was sportswear and sportswear was what every college kid was wearing. As for shoes, you guessed it, sporty two-tone Oxfords, straps, and pumps were in vogue, and flashy satin sandals were out. In winter, wearing a raccoon coat was high fashion!
While the runway showcases what’s coming next in fashion, the streets display not only the future but also what’s on-trend right now. So, if you’re looking to keep your wardrobe up-to-date, the world’s top street style stars have the inspiration you need. Every season, these stylish ladies debut the latest and greatest fashion looks, and Spring/Summer 2019 was no exception. From Paris and Milan to London and New York, every fashion week from the month featured outstanding outfits and lust-worthy looks. Here, we’ve rounded up the top street style trends from the season for you to add to your shopping list.

Also – I’m getting the impression from surfing around that ladies (flappers) did not carry purses but only little make-up bags. i’ve been wondering whether this is just for evenings out (when their escort would be expected to have bulky things like cash ) and whether bigger handbags were used during the day. .[I pretty sure I’ve seen Margaret with a bag on Boardwalk Empire….]
"Among many others, I’ve worked with luxury brands such as Analeena; magazines and publishing houses such as Washingtonian Magazine, Penguin Random House, Anaya Multimedia and Montena; or brands such as Oysho (Inditex), Delush Polish, AdelitaAdelita, etc. My work has also been presented at the GBK Luxury Gift Lounge in the New York Fashion Week 2014." — Cristina Alonso, fashion illustrator
Danielle Bernstein’s ‘We Wore What’ has an interesting approach that focuses on style, fashion, and just that. You’d realize that her posts are often full angle shots, with barely close angle pictures, because she is someone who believes that she loves fashion, so everything else can take a backseat. She wants her followers to focus on her outfits, and we think it brings an excellent perspective to the table. With over a million followers that get a dose of her everyday outfits, she is an unstoppable force.
Savage Beauty, Independent Kostym and Min Boudoir Magazine did a collaboration that covered the look of the 1920’s until the 1950’s. It was published a few months back in “Min Boudoir # 5”. If you are interested in the retro, burlesque, vintage fashion and lifestyle of this era, this is a good magazine to pick up. I did all the make up and shot all the photos for this project. My sister Amanda Martinez was in charge of the costume styling to get the perfect and accurate look of the decade. Here is the english and un-edited version, showing more pictures from our project. Next week we will cover the 1930’s!
Men’s formalwear entailed a black tuxedo with tails or the new style of dinner jacket (now called a tuxedo coat). A white button-down dress shirt with wingtip collar and white or black bow tie was worn under a white or black U-shape vest. Wearing white was the most formal look, while black was for most semi-formal occasions. Black patent leather shoes and a top hat completed the formality. Young men who did not have the means of purchasing a tuxedo were acceptable in their best suit. The old guard didn’t like this much, but establishments like the opera and theater had to lighten the rules otherwise the young men could not afford it and the art form would die. The white dinner jacket over black pants wasn’t worn until the 1930s.
A tailored dress made of a silk blend crepe or wool was also appropriate. These dresses featured a natural waist sash in the early 20s that gradually moved down into a drop waist with a thin belt. Dresses fit loose and usually slipped on overhead. A small collar or wide open flat collar with a bow tie at the neck was essential to the 20s wardrobe. Details were added to the dress that elongated the body such as vertical pintucks, a row of buttons, and pleated skirts.
This entry was posted on April 2, 2013 at 9:36 pm and is filed under Make Up - Savage Beauty, Savage Beauty Photography with tags 1920's Fashion, Amanda Martinez, Independent Kostym, Mattias Savage Wilmenius graphics, Min Boudoir, Savage Beauty Make Up, Savage Beauty Photography, Tallee Savage Photography, Tifa Högberg, Vintage fashion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.
In the early years, suits were slim and plain colored. By the mid ’20s, the wide leg look with a loose suit coat made men much more comfortable. These also came in bolder wide stripes, big checks, windowpane, plaid, and tweed fabrics.  Gentlemen’s suits in the summer were nice white linen or seersucker suits. Suit jacks buttoned up with 3-4 buttons to mid-chest. The jacket hung down to the upper thigh and was worn over a matching lapel collar vest. Both coat and vest lapels were quite wide. The skinny “jazz suit” was a brief fad in the very late teens/the early ’20s only. Men wanted wide, loose clothing that felt as comfortable as their weekend attire starting around 1922.
In the early 1920s, bows weren’t necessary prominent features on women’s coats, but by the mid twenties, Paris had cabled the world to let them know: bows are in. Depending on the budget, a woman would generally choose between wool velour and fur. A particularly nice coat might be made of all-wool Venise Bolivia, with a Paris bow and buckle that fastened in front of the left hip.
Some women did go without body shaping entirely, or might wear just a very loose silk “bra” (they were not called that at the time) or longer line vest with loose fitting French knickers which seem rather big to us but were extremely brief for the period. A combination teddy could also be worn. In winter, knitted wool jersey versions of these were much warmer. A slip or petticoat, and stockings in silk or rayon, with a garter if it wasn’t already attached to the other undergarments, completed the underwear.
"If one door closes, another opens – don't be discouraged by a commission which falls through because there are plenty other opportunities waiting for you. If you already exchanged some emails with a client, there's still a chance that he'll remember about you the next time and/or will recommend you to other potential clients. Take it as a lesson of enduring such situation humbly." — Ewelina Dymek

Fashion Design: Brands, designers, and fashion media often want to showcase new designs, fashion trends, or something else that needs an experienced illustrator to create beautiful illustrative work to showcase their concepts. Whether it’s adding something not yet created to their lookbook, illustrating new runway looks, or focusing on various trends, fashion illustrators and the world of fashion itself often go hand-in-hand.
Musicians and college kids often wore wide striped blazers over white pants as a summer outfit. This look was popularized by Barber Shop quartet singers, ragtime pianists, and traveling salesmen (aka The Music Man.) Some costumes skip the blazer and wear a striped vest, bow tie and armbands/sleeve garters instead. A straw boater hat completes the festive summer outfit.
About this time every summer I receive a handful of requests for men’s vintage boating outfits. Sometimes these requests come from antique wooden boat owners who want to dress the year that matches their boat and other times they come from the general public planning to attend a vintage boat show. My local wooden boat … Read More about Mens Vintage Boating Outfits, Sailing Clothes
This past weekend was amazing! I went to the Jazz Age Sunday Social in Dallas with @wideawakevintage @rubyrouxbijou and also spent some time in Austin. This was the outfit I wore to the Sunday Social and it got me first prize in the best dressed contest! Thanks @guermantes.vintage for the amazing dress! Paired with 20's blue silk stockings, shoes from @vintagemartini and 20's hat and purse.
(Above) Even working at a silk mill, young women took the time to stay on the fashion trend. Here a worker in 1924 has the latest bobbed haircut and what appears to be a canton silk (silk and cotton) blend dress with embroidered waistband. The working girl on the left is wearing a gingham print cotton house dress with white collar and black leather belt.
Men’s dress shoes consisted of lace-up cap toe, wingtip Oxford or derby shoes. The most dressy Oxford was the wingtip with a distinct W design on the toe. Most middle-class businessmen opted for the simple cap toe Oxford in brown or black or white nubuck in summer. Some old men continued to wear lace-up dress boots.  With snazzy new suit colors came the trend of two-tone Oxfords. Usually brown and white, they looked very dapper. Saddle shoes in brown and white were another casual shoe although a few came in black and white. Learn more about 1920s men’s shoe styles. 
We could all use some fashion inspiration, and that’s why we rounded off some of the best out there. Not all of us can afford designer collections or limited editions, but we can surely pick up from the cues these bloggers give away, and style our outfits to make them look exciting, if anything. Who are your style icons? Do you have fashion gurus you follow? What are your go-to fashion blogs? Let us know by dropping in a text in the comments section below.
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