Pretty much everyone I interviewed has a good, well-viewed social media presence. Whether on Instagram, Behance, Twitter, Facebook, or other sites, each artist connects with their public, regularly updating with artwork, prints or products they produce themselves, or in-process pieces meant to engage the viewer and get more potential clients to their accounts and portfolios. When it comes to niche design jobs, you want to do everything you can to sell your work on your terms and get the word out that you’re available for hire or have artwork for sale.
"If one door closes, another opens – don't be discouraged by a commission which falls through because there are plenty other opportunities waiting for you. If you already exchanged some emails with a client, there's still a chance that he'll remember about you the next time and/or will recommend you to other potential clients. Take it as a lesson of enduring such situation humbly." — Ewelina Dymek
Another influence the émigrés had been in bringing their traditional style of embroidery to Paris. Russian “peasant” embroidery appeared on extremely sophisticated outfits, and in some cases mingled with the traditions and motifs from many other countries. It was called “Oriental” but it encompassed designs from many countries. The Ballet Russe had widely introduced this fantasy style to Paris and the city was also fascinated by black jazz bands and the dancing of Josephine Baker. This admiration meant that black artists and culture also influenced the fashions of the time.

Chic is characterized by being trendy and fashionable. It is a type of statement to make oneself look smart and striking. Whoever follows this style makes sure to choose well tailored stylish designs that are pretty classy. Strong colors which are not extravagant, comes as a part of the chic style. It is something that relates to being casual in not so casual way. If you are part of this style, your wardrobe is a symbol of style.
Why you should follow: High fashion can sometimes seem like it's out of reach. While the likes of Chanel and Gucci will always hold a place in our hearts (and most bloggers' closets), sometimes it's great to know how to shop without spending a fortune. Alex Stedman of The Frugality constantly proves that the high street offers incredible pieces that look super expensive (such as this jumper from M&S).
Men’s formalwear entailed a black tuxedo with tails or the new style of dinner jacket (now called a tuxedo coat). A white button-down dress shirt with wingtip collar and white or black bow tie was worn under a white or black U-shape vest. Wearing white was the most formal look, while black was for most semi-formal occasions. Black patent leather shoes and a top hat completed the formality. Young men who did not have the means of purchasing a tuxedo were acceptable in their best suit. The old guard didn’t like this much, but establishments like the opera and theater had to lighten the rules otherwise the young men could not afford it and the art form would die. The white dinner jacket over black pants wasn’t worn until the 1930s.

Women’s shoes became more delicate and pretty over the past decades simply because they were more visible with short dresses. For daytime use, the low hee lace-up oxford shoe in brown, white or black was worn everyday. For something a little nicer for going out or dressing up it was the classic mary jane heel with a single strap across the front. The T strap heel is the most famous evening shoe because it held onto the foot while dancing the Charleston. They often came in black and gold or silver hand painted designs to really stand out on the dance floor. There were slip on pumps inspired by colonial-era shoes and multip strap heels int he early 20s.

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Would you rock this on a night out? I did this easy pink cut crease a while ago with my @sleekmakeup palette. Don't mind me, trying to get my #beyonce on 🙌🏾👀🤣 yasss! #makeuptutorial #makeup #makeuplover #makeupjunkie #makeupart #makeupph #makeupporn #makeupbyme #makeuplook #pink #eyemakeup #sleekmakeup #makeupmurah #makeupmafia #makeupdolls #mua #lashes #lipstick #lips #fbf #f4f #lookbeauty #ilovemakeup #beautyblogger @universalhairandmakeup @makeuptutorialsx0x @make4glam_ @fakeuproom @fakeupfix

“Fashion illustration can’t be retouched and there is certainly an appeal in that,” says Brett Croft, head of the Vogue House archive. “There is definitely a younger generation of illustrator coming through,” he adds. “It’s to do with Edward of course, but it’s also part of a movement towards more simple artforms which was very obvious at Frieze this year. Last year was all about video and this year there seemed to be a reaction away from that. I think there is an appeal in the fact it can’t be hyper real. It just is what it is - there’s a simplicity to it that is refreshing.”


Hailing from Finland and now living in London (although she travels tonnes), Sandra Hagelstam named her blog after her lifetime love affair with super high stilettos. The blonde beauty doesn’t just showcase shoes though, and her blog is an aspirational lesson in glamourous Scandi dressing. Favouring neutrals, feminine shapes and of course high heels, Sandra mixes up her personal style posts with diaries of her travels and her latest beauty finds. 

Hailing from Finland and now living in London (although she travels tonnes), Sandra Hagelstam named her blog after her lifetime love affair with super high stilettos. The blonde beauty doesn’t just showcase shoes though, and her blog is an aspirational lesson in glamourous Scandi dressing. Favouring neutrals, feminine shapes and of course high heels, Sandra mixes up her personal style posts with diaries of her travels and her latest beauty finds.

Evening dresses were made of fine materials like silk, chiffon, taffeta and light velvet. They were usually sleeveless for young women and long sleeves for older women. Dresses featured the iconic ’20s drop waist with layers or tiers of fabric creating some fullness from the waist down. Beaded dresses were the most glamorous and most expensive. Some had fringe or metal sequins, but this was quite rare. The short, fringed flapper dress is a ’20s myth. Real flappers wore knee-length or longer gowns that swished and swayed white dancing to jazz.
Colors for city folk were a bit on the drab side: black, navy, grey, tan, and olive green. Country folk and seaside dwellers liked color: white in summer, yellow, red, blue, and light grey year round. The difference between city and country clothing in Europe was far more pronounced than in America.  Americans loved to disobey fashion “rules” and wore whatever color they personally liked. Learn more about daytime 20s dresses here or shop daytime appropriate dresses online. 
Many of her posts are highly visual – showcasing the same types of images usually shared on Instagram. This is particularly relevant in her OOTD (Outfit of the Day) category. She shares luscious photos of her day, detailing everything she wears. Kyrzayda provides links to where you can buy what you like. Her followers apparently like to share her OOTD. There are always plenty of comments from her fans giving her opinion on the outfits.
1920s fashion in makeup was highly influenced by films. This was the era of silent movies which were extremely popular. In these early times, film lighting was bright and film stock didn’t pick up much detail so film stars (both 1920s men and women) had to really exaggerate their facial features for them to show up. This was especially important because without sound, a lot of acting was performed with the face to convey emotion. So heavy khol round the eyes, a very pale complexion, full eyelashes using mascara and sometimes false eyelashes, and very defined lipstick were all used now.
The Chriselle Factor on Youtube has close to 29 million views, and over half a million subscribers, which is why she is undeniably the biggest fashion blogger and expert there is. Even though she has been associated with big names in the fashion industry, she started the blog as a journal to share her personal style and musings, and she turned into a Youtube content creator to educate, share, and inspire women.
Leandra Medine is an American author, fashion blogger, and a humor writer. The blog ‘Man Repeller’ is a quirky yet rooted and an honest place that talks about everything women love, and men hate – to quote her. She has an exceptional ability to blend high-street fashion and giving it a comedic aesthetic to prove her life’s motto that you don’t have to take everything seriously. That’s how she came about the idea of starting this blog with a bunch of others that align with her ideas. It is a blog that is about more than just one woman sharing her personal style, but rather a team ringing in millions of monthly views. Check the blog, and you’d know what we are talking about.
Whatever the catalyst, fashion illustration is having 'a moment’. It has been fidgeting the industry for some time - perhaps since Nick Knight introduced Helen Downie’s Unskilled Worker into fashion's limelight two years ago, and it’s now truly kicking. Grace Coddington and Michael Robert’s GingerNutz story in our December issue - whose cover itself generated a multitude of illustrated versions that flooded the social channels - stands as definitive proof. The video of Coddington talking about it generated 10,000 views in its first twelve hours on YouTube, while Caroline Stein’s Instagram version of Pat McGrath’s LABS generated 100 likes-a-minute for the first hour it was live. People clearly like looking at it.
Pretty much everyone I interviewed has a good, well-viewed social media presence. Whether on Instagram, Behance, Twitter, Facebook, or other sites, each artist connects with their public, regularly updating with artwork, prints or products they produce themselves, or in-process pieces meant to engage the viewer and get more potential clients to their accounts and portfolios. When it comes to niche design jobs, you want to do everything you can to sell your work on your terms and get the word out that you’re available for hire or have artwork for sale.
The girl next door. The classic style that’s been around for ages. This fashion style doesn’t pay attention to the latest trends and doesn’t involve anything wild or exotic. This trend focuses on simplicity and cuteness, with a striped tee, shorts, and tennis shoes enough to make her happy. At the end of the day, she just wants to be adorable and casual!
Ultra Violet may be the Pantone Colour of the Year for 2018, but street style stars preferred a softer take on the trend this season. Rocking a range of shades from the lavender family, fashionistas proved that light purple is seriously stylish. Whether worn in the form of boots, dresses, coats or even head-to-toe ensembles, the flattering and feminine colour added a lovely touch to looks. Try it for yourself if you’re after something subtle yet exciting.

Many of her posts are highly visual – showcasing the same types of images usually shared on Instagram. This is particularly relevant in her OOTD (Outfit of the Day) category. She shares luscious photos of her day, detailing everything she wears. Kyrzayda provides links to where you can buy what you like. Her followers apparently like to share her OOTD. There are always plenty of comments from her fans giving her opinion on the outfits.
A career as a fashion illustrator typically requires a bachelor's degree in graphic design or a related field. Those interested in pursuing this career will need to build a portfolio to showcase their work to potential employers. Fashion illustrators use art to express fashion designs and ideas, and they may be employed by publications, studios, fashion designers or clothing manufacturers.
While the runway showcases what’s coming next in fashion, the streets display not only the future but also what’s on-trend right now. So, if you’re looking to keep your wardrobe up-to-date, the world’s top street style stars have the inspiration you need. Every season, these stylish ladies debut the latest and greatest fashion looks, and Spring/Summer 2019 was no exception. From Paris and Milan to London and New York, every fashion week from the month featured outstanding outfits and lust-worthy looks. Here, we’ve rounded up the top street style trends from the season for you to add to your shopping list.

Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.
I feel like there’s a lot of love in the vintage community for 20s style, but there’s a much higher barrier of entry to it than there is to, say, 1950s style. For starters, there’s just way less of it. A dress from 1926 would be 90 years old this year. Pieces from that decade are out there, but they’re rare, they’re fragile, and they’re really expensive, particularly if they’re in a really wearable condition. On top of that, the 20s never really came back the way that other decades have. You can find 30s inspired looks from the 90s, and 40s and 50s inspired styles from the 80s, but there wasn’t really a point where people were like “let’s dress like it’s the 20s again!” in a widespread way. Certain details popped up in other eras – beading, fringing, dropped waists – but, at least in my experience, it’s unusual to come across a dress from a later era that truly feels like a 20s piece.
"Among many others, I’ve worked with luxury brands such as Analeena; magazines and publishing houses such as Washingtonian Magazine, Penguin Random House, Anaya Multimedia and Montena; or brands such as Oysho (Inditex), Delush Polish, AdelitaAdelita, etc. My work has also been presented at the GBK Luxury Gift Lounge in the New York Fashion Week 2014." — Cristina Alonso, fashion illustrator
Life Drawing: While many fashion illustrators have highly stylized work, the basic foundations of drawing figures from life and anatomy are necessary in order to create figures in a variety of poses, with and without reference, for most any project. No one says you have to be a master at life drawing. Rather, an understanding of the human form allows an artist to distort it as they see fit to create interesting and stylized figures that can fit a variety of projects and the needs of clients.

Claire Goldsworthy goes by and is famous for her Instagram handle – The Fashion Advocate, and she is a real manifestation of that. The Australian fashion blogger is not your typical run off the mill pulling off latest-trends-blogger. Rather, her style diary, which is her blog, got her thinking about the fast-moving fashion around us, and how we have forgotten the art of consuming products with values and ethics. She interviews, associates, and encourages brands with an ethical and moral binding as opposed to just the highs of fast fashion that become obsolete almost instantly. Check her blog, and follow her on Insta, and I’m sure she will get you thinking.
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