Why: Kavita’s been blogging for several years now and it’s been amazing to watch her star rise, from her #OOTD shots as a sixteen year old through to a Coachella VIP frolicking with celebrities. Her bold colourful looks are a great blend of both high street and luxury, though she’s got a soft spot for a Gucci bag – a girl after our own heart, basically.
A higher hemline became desirable but not all clothes during the roaring twenties were short, dresses and coats, for the most part were calf length for most of the 1920s era. The one good thing about the flapper dress was that it was such a simple construction that even if you couldn’t afford to go out and buy one, you could make one yourself at home with a bit of imaginative dressmaking skill.

Specific sports called for different types of clothing; however, there were two primary sets. The first set was worn by golfers, tennis players and other ladylike sports. It consisted of a long or tea length skirt, long sleeve blouse and a loose-knit vest or sweater. A thin belt tied the waist in. A low heel Oxford or flat saddle shoes were best on grassy surfaces. It is a look not too different from the college style above.


"I get requests from potential clients via email asking if I'm available and explaining what they would need me to do. I then draft and send them an estimate for them to sign. I first do a rough sketch, take a picture of it to send to the client for validation. Once it's been okayed, I finish it in black and white and if needed, I add color later using pencils as well.
1950s fall makeup looks of Kim Novak, Debbie Reynolds and Sandra Dee. The Fresh Look, the romantic look and the kookie look. The 1950’s makeup look straight from Hollywood. Fall Makeup “Every woman can be beautiful”. That’s what Richard Smith, 20th Century Fox make-up artist says.“If she has patience with her makeup and learns to stress her best feature.” “The…
We toyed with it on Vogue.co.uk during my decade as editor of the site from 2005 to 2015, with a shoppable version of the Fashion Illustrated Gallery (founded by William Ling; stocking the work of all the prominent modern illustrators including Downton and Ling’s wife Tanya), running alongside an illustrated blog by Downton himself written from the Fumoir - but it didn’t get huge traction. In contrast, today illustration generates great engagement, even recently making it into the realms of the still-controversial space of branded content with a campaign of illustrated fashion fairytales that ran across Vogue, GQ and Tatler which surpassed all commercial targets for a month-long campaign within the first 24 hours.

“Fashion illustration can’t be retouched and there is certainly an appeal in that,” says Brett Croft, head of the Vogue House archive. “There is definitely a younger generation of illustrator coming through,” he adds. “It’s to do with Edward of course, but it’s also part of a movement towards more simple artforms which was very obvious at Frieze this year. Last year was all about video and this year there seemed to be a reaction away from that. I think there is an appeal in the fact it can’t be hyper real. It just is what it is - there’s a simplicity to it that is refreshing.”
A vibrant fashion style is reserved for the lady who wants to say “Hey, look at ME, world!” This energetic and intense fashion style typically features garments with wild patterns and exaggerated embroidery as well as asymmetrical designs and tons of colors. Most of her wardrobe will be lined with super light and pastel colors that draw the attention of everyone’s eyes, no matter where it’s worn.
A significant section of the blog is “Outfits,” and this predominantly features what Grasie wears in her daily activities. The posts are highly visual, with captions describing the outfits worn, often explaining why Grasie likes and wears particular items. She generally includes links to sites where her fans can buy items to emulate her look, often giving alternatives in various price ranges.

Why you should follow: Marissa Cox not only writes Rue Rodier, she's also one of Who What Wear's columnists, so you know we really rate her style. The fashionable Brit moved to Paris in 2013 but had to change up her style to match her chic new city. As a result, she's got some brilliant learnings to dish out when it comes to dressing French. Merci, indeed. 

Lips: Deep red, burgundy, plum, raspberry or dark orange tones depending what year of the 1920’s. To get a “bee-bitten” lip-look you need to apply the lipstick like a “cupid bow” exaggerated on both upper and lower part of the lips, but stops quite dramatically before reaching the corners of your mouth. Light colors on the mouth was less flattering in the 20’s.
Traveling in the 1920s was a dirty affair. Cars were dusty, trains were hot and buses were so packed with people that people were bound to be a wrinkled mess by the time they arrived at their destination. For those reasons, 1920s traveling clothes, for both men and women, were simple suits, a sturdy overcoat, comfortable hat, leather gloves, leather purse or luggage, and low profile shoes. Colors were drab grey, brown and blue that showed the least amount of dirt possible. Materials that wrinkled, like linen and cotton, were avoided, and instead knit, wool or sturdy cotton blends were preferred.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), graphic designers earned an annual median salary of $46,900 in 2015. Continuously refining skills and developing professionally might help fashion illustrators earn more with time, as the top 10% of graphic designers earned over $81,000 that same year. The BLS predicted 1% employment growth for all graphic designers from 2014 through 2024, which means there will be little to no change in the number of jobs available.


Once she arrived at her beachside destination, casual comfort was of the utmost importance. White or navy dresses with a nautical or sailor theme were what all classes would wear. Upper classes in the late 1920s began wearing a pants ensemble called beach pajamas. They were inspired by Asian prints with wide legs and a kimono style top or jacket. They were one of the few times women could wear pants. Read about the other types of women’s pants here. 
Body wave perms help to give volume to hair. They’re generally suited for people with thin or flat hair and the curls will be larger on women with hair that is naturally quite straight. It produces loose curls and a gentle wave which is great for adding volume and a bit of life to dull hair. It’s great for shoulder length hair or longer and suits people with square faces as it tends to soften facial features.
It’s not hard to point out a gal that wears the cowgirl fashion style! In this particular style, there’s a few staples that are an absolute must for the wardrobe: undoubtedly an adorable cowgirl hat, typically in either some shade of brown or pink, a pair of flared blue jeans with western themed leather belt, denim jacket to match, a pair of cowgirl boots, and a few white t-shirt and plaid button-ups.

Musicians and college kids often wore wide striped blazers over white pants as a summer outfit. This look was popularized by Barber Shop quartet singers, ragtime pianists, and traveling salesmen (aka The Music Man.) Some costumes skip the blazer and wear a striped vest, bow tie and armbands/sleeve garters instead. A straw boater hat completes the festive summer outfit.


Women had always been included in sports like horse-riding, tennis, skiing, and golfing, but up till now they did it wearing every day dress, with little modification. In the 1920s every day dress had become a little more practical, and in addition things like jodphers for skiing or flared skirts for playing tennis in were suggested. Swimwear in 1920s fashion became far more body conscious and practical, with knitted wool swimsuits looking a lot like today’s one pieces.
The college look would be the tag most suitable for the preppy look. The collared T-Shirts are matched and A-line skirts are matched with girly blouses that are lined up in their wardrobe. A cute little headband and geeky glasses mostly do accompany with this style. The geeky look might seem to be an expensive style, but it is not required to shell out much to get this look as it is not that luxurious.
At 16, Kavita Donkersley started ‘She Wears Fashion’ but she admits that it was all a mess and she was just confused as any 16 year old would be. However, she kept at it, and discovered her love for fashion and travel with every passing year. And today, at 23, she has 56k (and growing) Instagram followers. Just with perseverance, a lot of hard work, and a little luck, she grew in the industry. She is associated with big brands, and is a guest at prestigious events like Coachella, etc.
Evening dresses were made of fine materials like silk, chiffon, taffeta and light velvet. They were usually sleeveless for young women and long sleeves for older women. Dresses featured the iconic ’20s drop waist with layers or tiers of fabric creating some fullness from the waist down. Beaded dresses were the most glamorous and most expensive. Some had fringe or metal sequins, but this was quite rare. The short, fringed flapper dress is a ’20s myth. Real flappers wore knee-length or longer gowns that swished and swayed white dancing to jazz.
There were many rich Russian émigrés to Paris in the years preceding the 1920s, and their style greatly influenced the master couturiers. They favoured fur-trimmed clothing, and you’ll see that widely on 1920s garments, and not only outwear – there were fur edges on skirts and cardigan cuffs and collars as well as appearing on jackets, coats and hats. The popularity of a fur stole never waned and fox, mink, rabbit, Persian lamb and “foxine” (cheaper fur dyed and treated to look like fox) appear slung over shoulders or firmly grasped. Fake fur had yet to make an appearance in 1920s fashion
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After World War I, the fashion landscape shifted like tectonic plates. Once reserved for aristocrats and the affluent, high fashion had taken a noticeably more attainable turn, allowing middle class men and women in on the fun. Some luxurious textiles were finally affordable, making it possible for fashionable items to be created at home. In the 1920s it was still quite common for clothes to be handmade.
The above describes what we think of as the quintessential “1920s Flapper”. Interestingly, the word “Flapper” was originally used around that time to describe a girl of about 13-19 and only became the term for this kind of woman gradually following the 1920 film “The Flapper”, which follows the (mis)fortunes of a schoolgirl and her fall from grace.

Ultra Violet may be the Pantone Colour of the Year for 2018, but street style stars preferred a softer take on the trend this season. Rocking a range of shades from the lavender family, fashionistas proved that light purple is seriously stylish. Whether worn in the form of boots, dresses, coats or even head-to-toe ensembles, the flattering and feminine colour added a lovely touch to looks. Try it for yourself if you’re after something subtle yet exciting.

As we’ve already seen the First World War brought many changes to the lives of women and by the time the roaring twenties were in full swing, women were enjoying the new found freedom they’d been giving due to the economic changes. They smoked and drank – they drove cars and how they dressed changed radically, from the more demure look of the Edwardian period, came the shorter hemlines of the early to mid-1920s.
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