Akanksha Redhu’s blog is a mixed bag and treasure trove. From everyday looks to travel posts, lifestyle, beauty tips, event coverages, and of course fashion, which remains the constant for all the categories – she posts it all. What started with an idea to journal fashion statements, is now 131k strong on Instagram, and one of India’s top fashion blogs. If you don’t follow her yet, make sure you do.
Some women did though: they did all of those things. Most adopted some elements or other in 1920s fashion, just as we pick and choose from fashions today. It’s also interesting to note that this wasn’t the only fashion available by any means: women had a wide variety of hat styles to chooses from, hairstyles for many stayed long and even the bob came in many different varieties, skirt lengths varied from knee to just above the ankle (you’d be quite old-fashioned to wear one longer, though), voluminous skirts were worn with fitted tops and, by the way, the Little Black Dress wasn’t invented in 1926 by Coco Chanel and immediately adopted as the only dress the chic could possibly wear: working women had been wearing black for decades already and fashionable clothes came in a rainbow of colours, black included.
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Men’s formalwear entailed a black tuxedo with tails or the new style of dinner jacket (now called a tuxedo coat). A white button-down dress shirt with wingtip collar and white or black bow tie was worn under a white or black U-shape vest. Wearing white was the most formal look, while black was for most semi-formal occasions. Black patent leather shoes and a top hat completed the formality. Young men who did not have the means of purchasing a tuxedo were acceptable in their best suit. The old guard didn’t like this much, but establishments like the opera and theater had to lighten the rules otherwise the young men could not afford it and the art form would die. The white dinner jacket over black pants wasn’t worn until the 1930s.
So there you have it. Any other type of activity you might encounter was usually determined by the time of day and the indication of formality. So, next time you head to a daytime tea party you will know to wear an afternoon dress or, for men, a summer white suit. For Gatsby’s lavish affair bare your arms and party like it is the day before prohibition starts!
Men’s dress shoes consisted of lace-up cap toe, wingtip Oxford or derby shoes. The most dressy Oxford was the wingtip with a distinct W design on the toe. Most middle-class businessmen opted for the simple cap toe Oxford in brown or black or white nubuck in summer. Some old men continued to wear lace-up dress boots.  With snazzy new suit colors came the trend of two-tone Oxfords. Usually brown and white, they looked very dapper. Saddle shoes in brown and white were another casual shoe although a few came in black and white. Learn more about 1920s men’s shoe styles. 
Notorious gangsters and bootleggers of the 1920s wore 3 piece suits, too.  What they wore was determined by their wealth, not their uh… occupation.  Some well-to-do gangsters were known for wearing white spats over their boots, just like men did in the early 1900s.  A walking cane or rolled umbrella was another accessory that said “old money”.  Younger gangsters (the muscle and weapon men) wore whatever suits they could afford. They often did not have matching vests, and they fit poorly since they were purchased second hand. Learn how to dress like a 1920s gangster here. 
Everything about Tami Reed is fascinating. Her personality, aura, wit and humor, fashion sense and everything else that caught the attention of big brands in no time. She had a substantial social media presence even before she turned into a fashion blogger. Tami wanted to do something concrete, and that’s how it all started. From being a red-carpet consultant to an entrepreneur, Tami Reed is a go-getter! For more inspiration and to stay updated with everything big happening in Hollywood or otherwise when it comes to fashion, check her blog.
Simple Makeup Tutorial from 1960 Vintage 1960s makeup tips from Hollywood actress Sandra Dee. Her teacher at Universal is the great Bud Westmore. The secret says Sandra is to look natural Start with Nails So her hands look prettier and nails won’t split, Sandra Dee applies polish, in pale shades of pearl. Then she uses colorless sealer over all Foundation…

Why: Hailing from Sao Paulo, Helena Bordon is one of Brazil’s most influential style bloggers. She started her fashion education from a young age courtesy of her mother, Donata Meirelles, the style director of Vogue Brazil. When Helena was just 7 years old, she’d join her mum at all the top fashion shows and eventually interned at Valentino. Now, Helena is co-founder of Brazilian high street fashion chain 284, as well as finding the time to run her eponymous blog, helenabordon.com, which offers Helena’s insider style, travel and beauty tips. Disclaimer: expect holiday envy.

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