Danielle Bernstein’s ‘We Wore What’ has an interesting approach that focuses on style, fashion, and just that. You’d realize that her posts are often full angle shots, with barely close angle pictures, because she is someone who believes that she loves fashion, so everything else can take a backseat. She wants her followers to focus on her outfits, and we think it brings an excellent perspective to the table. With over a million followers that get a dose of her everyday outfits, she is an unstoppable force.
Women’s shoes became more delicate and pretty over the past decades simply because they were more visible with short dresses. For daytime use, the low hee lace-up oxford shoe in brown, white or black was worn everyday. For something a little nicer for going out or dressing up it was the classic mary jane heel with a single strap across the front. The T strap heel is the most famous evening shoe because it held onto the foot while dancing the Charleston. They often came in black and gold or silver hand painted designs to really stand out on the dance floor. There were slip on pumps inspired by colonial-era shoes and multip strap heels int he early 20s.
Proving once and for all that the minimal trend is over, this show season saw attendees embrace lashings of fabric. While this meant bold ruffles and oversized silhouettes, it also resulted in statement puff shoulders on both dresses and blouses. Simultaneously striking and stylish, these puff sleeves added a fun ‘80s twist to modern outfits. Try the look yourself if you’re after a powerful and fashionable daytime style. Just be sure to keep the rest of your look subdued, so you don’t appear over-the-top.
Eyes: A dark and dramatic look, with black smeared eyeliner liberally and heavily applied, topped with dark grey, green or turquoise eyeshadow to get the “smokey eyes” look. Emphasis lay in the middle of the eye to get a perfect round shape. White or off-white eyeliner inside the eye to enlarge optimally. Lots and lots of mascara! In those days mascara came in a block form and needed to be heated up and applied with a stick or wand. False eyelashes were popular!
In the summer, men’s felt hats were tossed aside in favor of lighter straw hats. The straw boater and skimmer are what most of us think of as men’s ’20s hats. They had a round flat crown and striped ribbon that often represented a gentlemen’s club or college colors. The lightweight straw Panama hat was expensive but much nicer than other thick straw boater hats.  By the end of summer, straw hats were in shambles and thrown away. Learn more about men’s hat styles. 
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Partial perms involve perming only the bottom half of your hair (or even just the very end if you choose) and leave the part of your hair nearest your scalp completely straight. This is a great way to add volume to your look without overdoing it and also tends to be a much manageable style than most other perms. If you’re going to be tying your hair up a lot this look is perfect for you.

The war didn’t bring equality to all women however, the vote was won by women who were house owners over 30 in 1918, and the rest of women did not get the vote until 1928 once they were over the age of 21. In 1918, ALL men had been given the vote over the age of 21. Having said that, although a narrow margin of women had been given the vote, it certainly helped women to feel that things were indeed changing – and for the better.


Ralph Lauren is worth $7.5 billion, and he got it all because of his fashion sense. In 1970, the first Polo logo was seen in Lauren’s line of women’s suits that was designed in the classic men’s style. Two years later, the famous short sleeve shirt with the Polo emblem appeared, and it soon became a classic. These shirts have been collected by men all over the world ever since. Lauren, on the other hand, has been collecting rare and classic cars. The collection is so unique that it has been featured in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.


“Photography has long been considered superior to illustration when it comes to selling magazines” says Downton. “But it’s like asking what an apple can do that a banana can’t. I think they have a symbiotic relationship. Illustration changes the pace of a magazine as you read it; and you project your own finish onto the story which gives a different sense of satisfaction to the reader.”
I feel like there’s a lot of love in the vintage community for 20s style, but there’s a much higher barrier of entry to it than there is to, say, 1950s style. For starters, there’s just way less of it. A dress from 1926 would be 90 years old this year. Pieces from that decade are out there, but they’re rare, they’re fragile, and they’re really expensive, particularly if they’re in a really wearable condition. On top of that, the 20s never really came back the way that other decades have. You can find 30s inspired looks from the 90s, and 40s and 50s inspired styles from the 80s, but there wasn’t really a point where people were like “let’s dress like it’s the 20s again!” in a widespread way. Certain details popped up in other eras – beading, fringing, dropped waists – but, at least in my experience, it’s unusual to come across a dress from a later era that truly feels like a 20s piece.

The silhouette at this time was a masculine one with flatter chests that were held down by specially made corsets. Bras weren’t about support as they are now, some were little more than camisoles, some women even went without bras in order to look more flat chested and breasts would therefore sit much lower down the chest wall as a result. Those with a more generous chest size would attempt to bandage their breasts down flat. The “Symington Side Lacer,” was a bra whose sole intention was to do just that. It was created so that both side could be pulled until the chest was flattened with lacing on both sides of the bra.
This entry was posted on April 2, 2013 at 9:36 pm and is filed under Make Up - Savage Beauty, Savage Beauty Photography with tags 1920's Fashion, Amanda Martinez, Independent Kostym, Mattias Savage Wilmenius graphics, Min Boudoir, Savage Beauty Make Up, Savage Beauty Photography, Tallee Savage Photography, Tifa Högberg, Vintage fashion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
Fashion Illustration has gone from being one of the sole means of fashion communication to having a very minor role. The first photographic cover of Vogue was a watershed in the history of fashion illustration and a watershed mark of its decline. Photographs, no matter how altered or retouched, will always have some association with reality and by association truth. I like to think of them [fashion Illustrations] as prose poems and having more fictional narratives. They are more obviously filtered through an individual vision than photos. Illustration lives on, but in the position of a poor relative to the fashion.

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20th century saw some serious improvement in terms of both men’s and women’s apparel. Spearheading this reform were a class of fashion icons whom we refer to as fashion designer artists. Most of the famous iconic fashion designers of the last century are known till at the present time for their ability to exhibit the beauty of a woman’s body by way of stylish, modernist, creative and elegant clothing. Below you will find a 10 list of all such iconic fashion designers, who have made women look stunning,beautiful, sensuous and gorgeous through their interesting and unique fashion designs.

A tailored dress made of a silk blend crepe or wool was also appropriate. These dresses featured a natural waist sash in the early 20s that gradually moved down into a drop waist with a thin belt. Dresses fit loose and usually slipped on overhead. A small collar or wide open flat collar with a bow tie at the neck was essential to the 20s wardrobe. Details were added to the dress that elongated the body such as vertical pintucks, a row of buttons, and pleated skirts.
Volumising perms add volume – it really is that simple. You can get them in a variety of curl styles but as a rule they tend to use quite tight curls to create extra volume. Plus, there tends to be lots of small curls opposed to a few loose big ones which adds even more volume. It’s not the easiest style in the world to manage but it is a look that is sure to get you noticed.
Those college kids get to have all the fun fashions. Being away from parents (who do their laundry) and in a fashion-forward subculture, college kids wore sportier clothing, such as knit dresses, knee length knit suits, knit sweaters, knit vests, knit socks, knits gloves… knit knit knit! They were easy to wash. Cotton, linen, silk and rayon dresses, too, but knitwear was sportswear and sportswear was what every college kid was wearing. As for shoes, you guessed it, sporty two-tone Oxfords, straps, and pumps were in vogue, and flashy satin sandals were out. In winter, wearing a raccoon coat was high fashion!
"Among many others, I’ve worked with luxury brands such as Analeena; magazines and publishing houses such as Washingtonian Magazine, Penguin Random House, Anaya Multimedia and Montena; or brands such as Oysho (Inditex), Delush Polish, AdelitaAdelita, etc. My work has also been presented at the GBK Luxury Gift Lounge in the New York Fashion Week 2014." — Cristina Alonso, fashion illustrator
A woman’s most common social activity was having tea with friends (or a lunch for businessmen). Tea parties could be semi-formal or formal. A tea dress was an afternoon dress made of lighter, brighter materials and more trim. The afternoon dress was a thing of sophisticated beauty. White dresses worn in summer were very attractive while pastels or rich jewel tones offered variety in the other seasons.
What type of dresses did women wear in the 1920s? Dresses came in all kinds of colors and shapes, but a very common dress seen in the late 1920s was a thin, loose silk dress with a thin belt around the waist with similar colored, delicate embroidery on the chest. The hemline wandered up and down, some women loved showing leg, others didn’t. Fortunately in the 1920s, designers catered to all different tastes.
About this time every summer I receive a handful of requests for men’s vintage boating outfits. Sometimes these requests come from antique wooden boat owners who want to dress the year that matches their boat and other times they come from the general public planning to attend a vintage boat show. My local wooden boat … Read More about Mens Vintage Boating Outfits, Sailing Clothes
The silhouette at this time was a masculine one with flatter chests that were held down by specially made corsets. Bras weren’t about support as they are now, some were little more than camisoles, some women even went without bras in order to look more flat chested and breasts would therefore sit much lower down the chest wall as a result. Those with a more generous chest size would attempt to bandage their breasts down flat. The “Symington Side Lacer,” was a bra whose sole intention was to do just that. It was created so that both side could be pulled until the chest was flattened with lacing on both sides of the bra.
While many coats were long, stretching below the knee, a shorter coat was also in fashion. Short sport jacquettes were quite popular for their convenience and functionality. Coney fur in a natural tan shade, or dyed in silverine shade (silver/gray blended with dark markings) was a popular choice for this coat. Another popular shade was called Muskratine, which was dyed in a tan shade with brown markings to closely resemble the natural muskrat.

As women’s style became more relaxed, there was more emphasis than ever before on sportswear and swimwear. We were still a long way off from the bikini here; a staple part of 1940s fashion, it wasn’t invented until 1946. But for the first time women could move freely and actually be active in their activewear, so all in all it was a pretty revolutionary decade.
A higher hemline became desirable but not all clothes during the roaring twenties were short, dresses and coats, for the most part were calf length for most of the 1920s era. The one good thing about the flapper dress was that it was such a simple construction that even if you couldn’t afford to go out and buy one, you could make one yourself at home with a bit of imaginative dressmaking skill.
Josephine Baker is the woman who inspired Beyonce’s booty-shake. How cool is that? The original showgirl was famous for her ‘banana dance’, plus she was a spy and she owned a pet cheetah, which she used to walk in Paris. A queen of accessorising, the Jazz Age beauty sometimes wore little else on stage, and by day she worked an Art Deco print like no other.

Susie Lau's Style Bubble has been going for over a decade and includes intelligent articles on everything from underground global fashion talent to perfume. She also provides fascinating behind-the-scenes pieces on the real work it takes to create a beautiful Chanel garment. Then there's the tongue-in-cheek Man Repeller run by Leandra Medine and her team. Its smart, witty take on fashion is refreshing. And if over-the-top clothes aren't your thing, we've also found plenty of bloggers with more pared-back styles for the minimalists. 
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