Art is subjective. By extension, fashion illustration is subjective. What makes something “good” will depend on the project, client, designer, and viewer. The needs of one piece may not fulfill the needs of another. That said, however, I still like to ask the opinions of illustrators on what they think makes for good work or what they look for in their own work to find satisfaction. Below are some fantastic answers for what could make a good fashion illustration:
College men wore looser suits, often without jackets- just a pair of pants, shirt, tie, belt and maybe a vest. Hats were optional as well. Raccoon coats were not. Whatever the trendy fashion of the year was college kids had to wear it. They also had to wear college colors in a scarf, a pocket square, bag, hat band, pin or ring.  School spirit was vital to the dress code.
That is certainly the experience of Anna Laurini (@annalauriniblue) who has seen her street work welcomed into the fashion art family with voracious enthusiasm. Having studied at Central Saint Martins, Laurini began to emblazon her signature Cubist-influenced, red-lipped face across billboards in Shoreditch and Mayfair “as a break from the studio” and is now regularly called upon for collaborations, most recently by Rupert Sanderson and Japanese label Black by Moussy. “It’s surprised me how popular my work has been in fashion terms,” she says. “I never expected it.” And again, Anna says, it’s the audience that is key to the success of her work. “I never give the woman a story as I paint her,” she says. “It’s really up to the viewer; people often tells me that my work resonates with their particular mood. I like that it’s relatable on a personal level.”
Gabi Gregg set off on this journey to tackle the infuriating gap for plus size women. She started off a blog about a decade ago to show and pave a path in a way that promotes body positivity while being impeccably stylish, vibrant, and colorful. Her outfits are full of life just like her, and so is her clothing line Premme, which caters to plus sizes. She brought, what she calls ‘the fatkini’, by collaborating with ‘Playful Promises’ and ‘Swimsuits’, and showed us how it’s done. We need more women like her, and thanks to social media, we get to follow her around.
From the beginning of the century, modern art shocked the world: cubism, fauvism, futurism, constructivism and the Weiner Werkstatte suggested a different kind of aesthetics that was radically simplified which not only affected pictures on walls but fashion, too. A lot of modern artists worked with fashion houses to design clothes and some, such as the Futurists, directly mentioned clothing in their manifestos. This had quite an influence of female dress, which moved towards a straighter, less complicated silhouette.

Ling agrees. “Illustration has always been outside the contemporary art structure,” he says. “Some call it second rate and of course there is validity to that in some cases - but the art industry has long been a construct of vested interests so talent hasn’t always necessarily been able to get through. Now Instagram is democratising art, but it's also populist - and in that context people have had careers they wouldn't have otherwise had. But there is no doubt it’s working for the audience - people are certainly buying more and illustrators tend to work with designers on collaborations which photographers rarely do. There’s just an additional collectible appeal.”

In the early 1920s, bows weren’t necessary prominent features on women’s coats, but by the mid twenties, Paris had cabled the world to let them know: bows are in. Depending on the budget, a woman would generally choose between wool velour and fur. A particularly nice coat might be made of all-wool Venise Bolivia, with a Paris bow and buckle that fastened in front of the left hip.
There is two main goals of the sexy fashion style: gain the attention of every male around you and show as much skin as legally and humanly possible. Sexy style is all about showing off your *best* features, those being your breasts, stomach, and legs. A woman whose fashion style is set to sexy is usually loaded with plenty of miniskirts, body-con dresses, high heels, and crop tops or low cut tops.
Why: Kavita’s been blogging for several years now and it’s been amazing to watch her star rise, from her #OOTD shots as a sixteen year old through to a Coachella VIP frolicking with celebrities. Her bold colourful looks are a great blend of both high street and luxury, though she’s got a soft spot for a Gucci bag – a girl after our own heart, basically.
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