If you’re worried about your perm looking a bit too uniform and unnatural, a multi-textured perm could be perfect for you. It’s created using two different sized styling rods which means the curls end up varying sizes throughout your hair. This is thought to look more natural and the uniform and defined curls you would get otherwise. Due to the nature of the perm, it’s best done on women with long hair – the result isn’t quite as flattering on short hair I’m sorry to say.
Bucket hats are well and truly back. Yes, the iconic ‘90s accessory is a must-have item for ’18/’19 and should undoubtedly be on your shopping list if you don’t already own one. Providing both sun protection and style, these casual and cool hats are perfect for weekend ensembles. Whether plain, patterned or featuring a logo, the brimmed hats add an on-trend edge to any outfit. Wear them with dresses, slouchy suits, overalls, and more.
Back in the 80s, curls were 100% the hairstyle to have. Straighteners were out and curlers, crimpers and perms were everywhere. Girls loved their curls and why not? They brought volume, life and waves to their hair. Now, thirty years later, everything retro is back in fashion and women everywhere are realizing that the 80s rocked – especially when it came to fashion.
Those college kids get to have all the fun fashions. Being away from parents (who do their laundry) and in a fashion-forward subculture, college kids wore sportier clothing, such as knit dresses, knee length knit suits, knit sweaters, knit vests, knit socks, knits gloves… knit knit knit! They were easy to wash. Cotton, linen, silk and rayon dresses, too, but knitwear was sportswear and sportswear was what every college kid was wearing. As for shoes, you guessed it, sporty two-tone Oxfords, straps, and pumps were in vogue, and flashy satin sandals were out. In winter, wearing a raccoon coat was high fashion!
Claire Goldsworthy goes by and is famous for her Instagram handle – The Fashion Advocate, and she is a real manifestation of that. The Australian fashion blogger is not your typical run off the mill pulling off latest-trends-blogger. Rather, her style diary, which is her blog, got her thinking about the fast-moving fashion around us, and how we have forgotten the art of consuming products with values and ethics. She interviews, associates, and encourages brands with an ethical and moral binding as opposed to just the highs of fast fashion that become obsolete almost instantly. Check her blog, and follow her on Insta, and I’m sure she will get you thinking.
The work of Mary Winkler (aka Acrylicana) is vivid and whimsical. It's often child-like in theme, depicting sweets, fanciful creatures and rainbows as well as exploring the world of fashion and garment in illustrated form. Done in a variety of media, including digital, acrylic, watercolour and ink, Mary's work is pop art, graphic and, for lack of a better word, sparkly. Her work is painted on canvas, a variety of papers or printed by way of giclee ink jet or silk screen (usually onto fabric for pouches/bags). Mary studied Illustration at College for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan.
In the early 1920s, bows weren’t necessary prominent features on women’s coats, but by the mid twenties, Paris had cabled the world to let them know: bows are in. Depending on the budget, a woman would generally choose between wool velour and fur. A particularly nice coat might be made of all-wool Venise Bolivia, with a Paris bow and buckle that fastened in front of the left hip.

There is two main goals of the sexy fashion style: gain the attention of every male around you and show as much skin as legally and humanly possible. Sexy style is all about showing off your *best* features, those being your breasts, stomach, and legs. A woman whose fashion style is set to sexy is usually loaded with plenty of miniskirts, body-con dresses, high heels, and crop tops or low cut tops.
We could all use some fashion inspiration, and that’s why we rounded off some of the best out there. Not all of us can afford designer collections or limited editions, but we can surely pick up from the cues these bloggers give away, and style our outfits to make them look exciting, if anything. Who are your style icons? Do you have fashion gurus you follow? What are your go-to fashion blogs? Let us know by dropping in a text in the comments section below.
“It’s happening now because social media is so hungry for content, but there is so much cold content out there; so much straight product, which has very little emotional resonance with the audience” says Downie, who was discovered by Nick Knight a year after now-famously taking up painting at the age of 48, and now works with Alessandro Michele at Gucci. “Luxury brands have had to find a way to show their collections in a warm way.”

The 70s fashion style can also easily be referred to as the ‘hippie’ look, where women leave their hair long and straight and add an adorable little flower or stem of flowers to create a natural finish. Their wardrobe will undoubtedly have the classic super-flared jeans and tons of tie-dye tops and accessories, as well as simple white tees to go with their look. Floral patterns are also common in this fashion style and makeup is minimal to maintain a simple and natural appearance.
The college look would be the tag most suitable for the preppy look. The collared T-Shirts are matched and A-line skirts are matched with girly blouses that are lined up in their wardrobe. A cute little headband and geeky glasses mostly do accompany with this style. The geeky look might seem to be an expensive style, but it is not required to shell out much to get this look as it is not that luxurious.
The people who prefer this are the ones who require everything at best quality. Nothing satisfies them if it is not worth the trouble. They often look for styles that make a statement on the quality, polished manner and culture. Most of them are the ones who are from higher status and are also in a way related to how a businesswoman would dress up. Sophisticated can be characterized as businesswoman minus the formal look. Culture and luxury mean the most to the people who choose this style of fashion.
It wasn’t until towards the end of the Edwardian period that things started to change again, towards more liberal attitudes once more. The First World War had seen women take a far more prominent role with driving, land work and machine operative jobs being taken over by women, while the men were at war. This gave women a new confidence, they smoked, they drank and they drove cars. They were different women to the ones they’d been before the war.
Also – I’m getting the impression from surfing around that ladies (flappers) did not carry purses but only little make-up bags. i’ve been wondering whether this is just for evenings out (when their escort would be expected to have bulky things like cash ) and whether bigger handbags were used during the day. .[I pretty sure I’ve seen Margaret with a bag on Boardwalk Empire….]
"A good fashion illustration for me is the one that does not look overworked. It needs to be easygoing and extraordinary, it needs to stand out. A good illustration is never overwhelmed or done by a strictly mechanical approach. At the same it's exactly the overall level of your drawing technique that makes one stand out." — Kato, fashion illustrator
Another formal suit worn by business executives, politicians, and grooms was the morning suit. It consisted of grey and black striped pants, grey vest, black morning coat, wingtip shirt, tie, and top hat. It was a style that was fading quickly except on special occasions and with the upper classes. It has come back around again today in wedding attire for grooms.

The college look would be the tag most suitable for the preppy look. The collared T-Shirts are matched and A-line skirts are matched with girly blouses that are lined up in their wardrobe. A cute little headband and geeky glasses mostly do accompany with this style. The geeky look might seem to be an expensive style, but it is not required to shell out much to get this look as it is not that luxurious.
One popular style was the buckle pump. Made over a stylish medium round toe in black patent leather, the shoe had an antique silver finished buckle, which concealed an elastic gore, making adjustment easy. A dressier look would be the stunning loop strap, that was made from Autumn Brown mesh leather trimming on the vamp and quarter. The light-colored leather quarter was carefully made not to soil hosiery and they had a spike heel.
As illustration has emerged as a tool for cutting through the visual noise of social media, it has itself benefitted from social media’s own disruption of the traditional barometers of quality. Just as David Bowie prophesied in his famous 1999 Newsnight interview that the internet would demystify the relationship between artist and audience, social media has “smashed down the gatekeepers”, says Downie, who doesn’t consider a picture finished until it’s given a “moment of birth” by being published on her Instagram account. “I cried when I saw that Bowie interview,” she says. “It’s so profoundly right, and it’s exactly what happened with my work.”

The Western World was seized with Egyptomania when King Tutankhamun’s tomb was discovered in 1922. The Egyptian King appeared to be dressed in pure gold sequins and had nets of faience beads spread over him. Immediately sequins and beading became all the rage, as well as Ancient Egyptian style emblems and pictograms (which often didn’t make sense). Even 1920s fashion illustrations were influenced, with models appearing in profile drawn in a flat style with a distinct black outline.


Sports clothes for men included a pair of pants or knickers called plus fours. These knee-length pants were paired with a patterned sweater or pullover vest and a long sleeve button down shirt with the sleeves rolled up. Argyle was a common sweater or vest print as well as a print for tall socks. Clashing colors were in style! An 8 panel cap (newsboy cap) was also worn and a pair of two-tone Oxfords or saddle shoes were snazzy.
I adore 1920s styles. They’re not easy for everyone to wear, but I think there’s something really beautiful about how they capture the transition from an earlier mode of dress to what we would now consider modernity. The clothes also reflect the changing status of women in society. Gone were the restrictive corsets (I mean, I actually like wearing a corset, but it’s also such a relief to take if off at the end of the day. I can’t even imagine having to lace into one virtually EVERY DAY of my adult life), the long, full skirts, the heavy mounds of hair piled up to emphasize a slender neck. I really can’t imagine just how light and free women must have felt when the new fashions took hold. Literally. Shucking 10 lbs of underwear will do that for you.
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Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…

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