Bobs came in many styles and quite a few lengths. They could be cut slightly longer than jaw length, or as high as the cheekbones with a clipped back. They could be parted at the centre or the side or have no parting, they could have a fringe or none, or if they did the fringe could be many different heights over the forehead, wispy or strong, cut straight across, curved or even as a heart shape. They could also be curled or waved in many different ways.
Objects in Space: This is basically perspective. A great way to study objects is by setting up a still life or drawing various objects around you in a less formal setup. Things like bags, shoes, and hats can all be constructed out of boxes, spheres, and other basic shapes. Understanding how they fit into a scene will go a long way to building your skillset up so that when you have to illustrate a new line of products, you’re ready.
Tiaras and diamond hair slides were also popular. They were designed to draw attention to the daring hairstyle. Shoes usually sported a kitten heel, nothing higher. For jewellery, as well as the hair decorations mentioned above, slave bangles, positioned above the elbow accentuated the bare arm, and a collection of bangles at the wrist also looked good. As well as this, ropes of pearls had been made fashionable by Chanel and dangly earrings were still in vogue.
But of course, women did not only wear dresses in 1920s fashion. They also favoured separates – skirts and a blouse, surmounted with a gently tailored jacket, long line or quite often a thick cardigan. The blouses ran the gamut from very simple to be-frilled, embroidered and with all kinds of fancy collars. They also, like dresses, came in many colours and prints.

Farmers, steel workers, miners and railroad men all had a distinctive uniform or dress code.  For a general manual labor position, sturdy denim and canvas overalls or coveralls with a plaid wool work shirt and tough leather boots was the standard dress. In cooler weather, a rain or oil slicker and fur-lined coat protected men from the elements. Manual labor was very hard. Progress was made for better labor conditions in the 1920s and more time off (yea weekends!), but the work itself was extremely difficult and not very lucrative. Work clothing took quite a beating and needed to be mended and replaced frequently.
Art is subjective. By extension, fashion illustration is subjective. What makes something “good” will depend on the project, client, designer, and viewer. The needs of one piece may not fulfill the needs of another. That said, however, I still like to ask the opinions of illustrators on what they think makes for good work or what they look for in their own work to find satisfaction. Below are some fantastic answers for what could make a good fashion illustration:
College men wore looser suits, often without jackets- just a pair of pants, shirt, tie, belt and maybe a vest. Hats were optional as well. Raccoon coats were not. Whatever the trendy fashion of the year was college kids had to wear it. They also had to wear college colors in a scarf, a pocket square, bag, hat band, pin or ring.  School spirit was vital to the dress code.

Specific sports called for different types of clothing; however, there were two primary sets. The first set was worn by golfers, tennis players and other ladylike sports. It consisted of a long or tea length skirt, long sleeve blouse and a loose-knit vest or sweater. A thin belt tied the waist in. A low heel Oxford or flat saddle shoes were best on grassy surfaces. It is a look not too different from the college style above.

Musicians and college kids often wore wide striped blazers over white pants as a summer outfit. This look was popularized by Barber Shop quartet singers, ragtime pianists, and traveling salesmen (aka The Music Man.) Some costumes skip the blazer and wear a striped vest, bow tie and armbands/sleeve garters instead. A straw boater hat completes the festive summer outfit.
With top-tier fashion bloggers raking in multimillion-dollar campaigns, it’s no wonder every self-proclaimed fashionista wants to launch a personal style site. But not all outfit posts are created equal. These fashion bloggers stand out from the pack thanks to their one-of-a-kind sartorial sense and sharp business acumen. Click through the slideshow above to meet the dynamic women ruling the blogosphere and our picks for the best fashion blogs of 2019. May the best blog win.
Texture and Textile Types: Knowing how to illustrate different textile types goes hand-in-hand with understanding how clothing works. The viewer wants to know if a dress is made of silk or tweed. They are such different types of textiles that perhaps just the way they move over a figure may be enough. If, however, you’re trying to illustrate the difference between chiffon and organza, you’ll need to know how stiff or soft each fabric is, how textured it feels, whether it’s opaque or translucent, or which fabric is typically used for certain dress styles or occasions. Being able to communicate these details to the viewer without having to label them is a brilliant skill to have. Practice this by drawing swatches of fabric and studying various types as well as studying how other illustrators have tackled textures within their design work.

Surprisingly, wearing Sunday’s best was not part of the ’20s culture unless a woman was poor and only had one nice outfit– then, certainly, she MUST wear that to church. Otherwise, whatever she wore for streetwear she also wore to church as long as it was modest with long sleeves and a below the knee hemline. If a sleeveless dress was worn a light shawl, wrap or jacket acted as a light coverup. Simple, non-distracting clothing was appreciated in church. Women were required to wear a hat, gloves and matching purse. These three accessories polished her look and gave her permission to add personality to an otherwise conservative dress. Shop 20s dresses. 

Other styles included, at the haute couture end, the “Infanta” dress. This was so-called because of its resemblance to dresses worn by Spanish Infantas in historical portraits. It was far more romantic than the chemise dress, consisting of a fitted bodice with a dropped waist, and flat, wide panniers to the hips. In length it usually was just below the knee. Versions of this included a similar bodice with a dropped waist but a flared full skirt instead of panniers, or fluted panels inserted into the skirt.
Fashion illustration has been around for nearly 500 years. Ever since clothes have been in existence, and there has been a need to translate an idea or image into a fashion illustration. Not only do fashion illustrations show a representation or design of a garment but they also serve as a form of art. Fashion illustration shows the presence of hand and is said to be a visual luxury. (Drake, 9).

There is two main goals of the sexy fashion style: gain the attention of every male around you and show as much skin as legally and humanly possible. Sexy style is all about showing off your *best* features, those being your breasts, stomach, and legs. A woman whose fashion style is set to sexy is usually loaded with plenty of miniskirts, body-con dresses, high heels, and crop tops or low cut tops.


Chanel was really in her element here, and this is when she invented the ‘Little Black Dress”. Another 20’s couturier of note is Madeline Vionnet, who designed clothes to accentuate and celebrate the natural line of a woman’s body. Her bias cut designs caused silk to fall in a new way, clinging and draping in all the right places. They were supremely elegant.
Lynn Slater started the ‘Accidental Icon’ because of the dearth of fashion blogs catering to the needs of women over 50s, 60s and beyond. You won’t find too many people like her, but you know the world needs more of that. With snow-white coiffed hair, this sixty-something grandmother is living it all up and raising bars, more like breaking barriers for all the right reasons. With floral kimonos, flaming hot oversized sunglasses, and a contagious fashion sense, Lyn Slater believes and shows us time and again that ‘age is just a variable.’ Thanks for proving the world wrong, Lyn, your 400,000 and growing fan club couldn’t be more grateful.
"A good fashion illustration for me is the one that does not look overworked. It needs to be easygoing and extraordinary, it needs to stand out. A good illustration is never overwhelmed or done by a strictly mechanical approach. At the same it's exactly the overall level of your drawing technique that makes one stand out." — Kato, fashion illustrator
As for purses women didn’t have much to carry so they were very small by today’s standards. Regular items were purchased on account, which the man paid, so you didn’t need to carry money. Purses were used for makeup, a handkerchief, and a few coins for the bus or movies. Some carried a flask in them. Some had built in makeup compacts. Many carried your cigarettes and cigarette holder. They were mostly an evening item but leather tooled bags were common for day wear. If a woman needed to shop she would bring a larger fabric bag to carry her items home. That probably was what Margaret was doing with hers? I need to rewatch Boardwalk and pay more attention to the ladies.
So embrace the the roaring Twenties and the liberation of movement that it brought – bring out your hats, your buckles and bows and rhinestones. The straight shift dress can still make such a dramatic statement. Either vintage or homemade, if it’s plain then depending on how good with a sewing machine you are, embellish with rhinestones and fringes.

Art is subjective. By extension, fashion illustration is subjective. What makes something “good” will depend on the project, client, designer, and viewer. The needs of one piece may not fulfill the needs of another. That said, however, I still like to ask the opinions of illustrators on what they think makes for good work or what they look for in their own work to find satisfaction. Below are some fantastic answers for what could make a good fashion illustration:
While the runway showcases what’s coming next in fashion, the streets display not only the future but also what’s on-trend right now. So, if you’re looking to keep your wardrobe up-to-date, the world’s top street style stars have the inspiration you need. Every season, these stylish ladies debut the latest and greatest fashion looks, and Spring/Summer 2019 was no exception. From Paris and Milan to London and New York, every fashion week from the month featured outstanding outfits and lust-worthy looks. Here, we’ve rounded up the top street style trends from the season for you to add to your shopping list.
Patchwork is no longer just a craft that your grandma enjoys. It’s also one of fashion’s latest trends. Spotted on the streets outside fashion shows from Paris to New York, patchwork appeared on dresses, jumpsuits, pants and more. As colourful as it is creative, the look sews together contrasting pieces of fabric to achieve an eclectic and eye-catching design. To rock the look yourself, allow your patchwork piece to be the focus of your outfit by teaming it with simple, block-coloured garments and accessories.
Born in January of 1905, this French designer was best known for his distinctive “New Look” silhouette. First shown in 1947; his suits and dresses revolutionized the way women dressed after the Second World War. Today, talented designer John Galliano carries on the legendary designer’s legacy in Paris, where he creates dramatic couture ball gowns, chic prêt-a-porter, and luxurious accessories for Dior. Galliano’s talent and his over-the-top runway shows have ensured that the brand remains strong and viable in today’s world…
Partial perms involve perming only the bottom half of your hair (or even just the very end if you choose) and leave the part of your hair nearest your scalp completely straight. This is a great way to add volume to your look without overdoing it and also tends to be a much manageable style than most other perms. If you’re going to be tying your hair up a lot this look is perfect for you.
Although bodies may have seemed slimmer during the 1920s era, this was an illusion as most women dressed to flatten their bodies – the kind of underwear we wear today was unheard of in the twenties. The corselette offered a whole new way of shaping the body, and unlike the corsets that had gone before, in the Edwardian period, the corselette didn’t press the waist in or lift the bust, but flattened the chest and held in the hips.
December is silver linings month on Man Repeller and I take our themes very seriously so here you go. I hope we can be your human silver lining 4ever. That’s the first thing I have to say. No.2: I have always wanted to be able to travel with a bag that serves as my bag and my carrier of things at once. You know what I mean right? So that should I find myself in need of a black tie accoutrement, I could just dump the practical contents of my dopp kit out and go to the porty with my evening bag, so I’m glad the Carry Bradshaw is facilitating that. Our pop-up closes in 2 hours and what a weekend it’s been! Thanks for coming, hanging, introducing yourself to us and especially for entrusting in us your precious free time. I promise to always do the most to make it — serving you when you need a break or a hug or a laugh or an animal to hook into your ear — worth it. Love u, @leandramcohen
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