There were many rich Russian émigrés to Paris in the years preceding the 1920s, and their style greatly influenced the master couturiers. They favoured fur-trimmed clothing, and you’ll see that widely on 1920s garments, and not only outwear – there were fur edges on skirts and cardigan cuffs and collars as well as appearing on jackets, coats and hats. The popularity of a fur stole never waned and fox, mink, rabbit, Persian lamb and “foxine” (cheaper fur dyed and treated to look like fox) appear slung over shoulders or firmly grasped. Fake fur had yet to make an appearance in 1920s fashion
Consider the illustrations that still appear on sewing patterns today. While many companies that manufacture sewing patterns have turned to actual photographs of the craft product itself, many of them stick to the age-old style of drawings and paintings showing the pattern designs in completed form on imaginary models. Companies like Simplicity and McCall’s still use fashion illustration on their products, as well as continuing to produce vintage patterns whose packaging design styles have inspired fashion illustrators for decades.
Consider the illustrations that still appear on sewing patterns today. While many companies that manufacture sewing patterns have turned to actual photographs of the craft product itself, many of them stick to the age-old style of drawings and paintings showing the pattern designs in completed form on imaginary models. Companies like Simplicity and McCall’s still use fashion illustration on their products, as well as continuing to produce vintage patterns whose packaging design styles have inspired fashion illustrators for decades.
With top-tier fashion bloggers raking in multimillion-dollar campaigns, it’s no wonder every self-proclaimed fashionista wants to launch a personal style site. But not all outfit posts are created equal. These fashion bloggers stand out from the pack thanks to their one-of-a-kind sartorial sense and sharp business acumen. Click through the slideshow above to meet the dynamic women ruling the blogosphere and our picks for the best fashion blogs of 2019. May the best blog win.

College men wore looser suits, often without jackets- just a pair of pants, shirt, tie, belt and maybe a vest. Hats were optional as well. Raccoon coats were not. Whatever the trendy fashion of the year was college kids had to wear it. They also had to wear college colors in a scarf, a pocket square, bag, hat band, pin or ring.  School spirit was vital to the dress code.
Paris was still the centre of fashion in the 1920s. If a dress didn’t come from Paris or wasn’t a copy of something that came from Paris, it simply wasn’t fashionable. But the good news: Paris was really into the simplified silhouette. So simplified that “sack” was a word regularly interchanged for “dress” – some frocks consisted literally of only two pieces, front and back with arm and neck holes. This could easily be made on the mass market or even by the home sewer. Sewing machines were becoming more affordable and most middle class households had them by now. A dress as simple as this could even be hand sewn fairly quickly and easily. It meant that 1920s fashion could be followed by the middle and working classes – quite a revolution.
Body wave perms help to give volume to hair. They’re generally suited for people with thin or flat hair and the curls will be larger on women with hair that is naturally quite straight. It produces loose curls and a gentle wave which is great for adding volume and a bit of life to dull hair. It’s great for shoulder length hair or longer and suits people with square faces as it tends to soften facial features.
Women’s shoes became more delicate and pretty over the past decades simply because they were more visible with short dresses. For daytime use, the low hee lace-up oxford shoe in brown, white or black was worn everyday. For something a little nicer for going out or dressing up it was the classic mary jane heel with a single strap across the front. The T strap heel is the most famous evening shoe because it held onto the foot while dancing the Charleston. They often came in black and gold or silver hand painted designs to really stand out on the dance floor. There were slip on pumps inspired by colonial-era shoes and multip strap heels int he early 20s.
Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…
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