Proving once and for all that the minimal trend is over, this show season saw attendees embrace lashings of fabric. While this meant bold ruffles and oversized silhouettes, it also resulted in statement puff shoulders on both dresses and blouses. Simultaneously striking and stylish, these puff sleeves added a fun ‘80s twist to modern outfits. Try the look yourself if you’re after a powerful and fashionable daytime style. Just be sure to keep the rest of your look subdued, so you don’t appear over-the-top.
Shoes and accessories were more dramatic, too. Shoes would be pumps or strap heels in a medium or high height. Stockings would be sheerer and in colors to match the dress. Gloves would also match or be white (and were taken off to eat).  A hat would be whatever is most becoming to the dress, such as a feather trim sun hat or decorative cloche. Learn more about dressing in afternoon party dresses. 

Every show season has its must-have handbag and Spring/Summer ’18/’19 is certainly no exception to this rule. However, unlike previous seasons, the latest “It” bag isn’t defined by its shape. Instead, its size is what sets it apart from the rest. Shrunk down to fit no more than a phone and lipstick (if you’re lucky), this season’s most lust-worthy bag is also its smallest. So, if you value style over function, be sure to invest in a miniature version of your favourite handbag. As a bonus, you definitely won’t have a sore shoulder from toting around this style all day.

As illustration has emerged as a tool for cutting through the visual noise of social media, it has itself benefitted from social media’s own disruption of the traditional barometers of quality. Just as David Bowie prophesied in his famous 1999 Newsnight interview that the internet would demystify the relationship between artist and audience, social media has “smashed down the gatekeepers”, says Downie, who doesn’t consider a picture finished until it’s given a “moment of birth” by being published on her Instagram account. “I cried when I saw that Bowie interview,” she says. “It’s so profoundly right, and it’s exactly what happened with my work.”


Paris was still the centre of fashion in the 1920s. If a dress didn’t come from Paris or wasn’t a copy of something that came from Paris, it simply wasn’t fashionable. But the good news: Paris was really into the simplified silhouette. So simplified that “sack” was a word regularly interchanged for “dress” – some frocks consisted literally of only two pieces, front and back with arm and neck holes. This could easily be made on the mass market or even by the home sewer. Sewing machines were becoming more affordable and most middle class households had them by now. A dress as simple as this could even be hand sewn fairly quickly and easily. It meant that 1920s fashion could be followed by the middle and working classes – quite a revolution.
Art is subjective. By extension, fashion illustration is subjective. What makes something “good” will depend on the project, client, designer, and viewer. The needs of one piece may not fulfill the needs of another. That said, however, I still like to ask the opinions of illustrators on what they think makes for good work or what they look for in their own work to find satisfaction. Below are some fantastic answers for what could make a good fashion illustration:
Josephine Baker is the woman who inspired Beyonce’s booty-shake. How cool is that? The original showgirl was famous for her ‘banana dance’, plus she was a spy and she owned a pet cheetah, which she used to walk in Paris. A queen of accessorising, the Jazz Age beauty sometimes wore little else on stage, and by day she worked an Art Deco print like no other.
In summer, an all wool suit was too hot. Instead, men turned to light flannel, striped seersucker or linen suits. There were a few years where pastel colors were popular such as the pink suit Gatsby wore otherwise white, ivory or beige were the best colors. Some men paired white pants with a double-breasted blue blazer for a yachting or nautical look.
"If one door closes, another opens – don't be discouraged by a commission which falls through because there are plenty other opportunities waiting for you. If you already exchanged some emails with a client, there's still a chance that he'll remember about you the next time and/or will recommend you to other potential clients. Take it as a lesson of enduring such situation humbly." — Ewelina Dymek
Why you should follow: High fashion can sometimes seem like it's out of reach. While the likes of Chanel and Gucci will always hold a place in our hearts (and most bloggers' closets), sometimes it's great to know how to shop without spending a fortune. Alex Stedman of The Frugality constantly proves that the high street offers incredible pieces that look super expensive (such as this jumper from M&S).
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