Chic is characterized by being trendy and fashionable. It is a type of statement to make oneself look smart and striking. Whoever follows this style makes sure to choose well tailored stylish designs that are pretty classy. Strong colors which are not extravagant, comes as a part of the chic style. It is something that relates to being casual in not so casual way. If you are part of this style, your wardrobe is a symbol of style.
Hats were not appropriate for evening wear unless it was a turban. Headbands, crowns, and hair combs were more appropriate. The purse, too, would have been of a formal nature being made of sequins, gold mesh, glittering beads or other colorful materials. It would have also been wise to wear a matching dress jacket, fringe evening shawl or fur wrap to a formal affair. Jewelry was minimal, perhaps a long bead or pearl necklace, rhinestone or feather headband , drop earrings and bracelet were optional. Accessories such as long gloves, a hand fan, fringe shawl or boa, cigarette holder and purse were also glamorous additions.
"I get requests from potential clients via email asking if I'm available and explaining what they would need me to do. I then draft and send them an estimate for them to sign. I first do a rough sketch, take a picture of it to send to the client for validation. Once it's been okayed, I finish it in black and white and if needed, I add color later using pencils as well.
"I work with both traditional and digital media, however the biggest job is done with the use pencils of varying lead hardness ranging from 8B to H. I'm constantly learning how to master smooth shading useful for realistic drawings and that's why working with pencils comes in handy in this case. Each drawing is scanned and edited a bit in Photoshop, which I find very useful to clean up the composition, adjust the contrast and work with the colors." — Ewelina Dymek, illustrator
It’s not true that women threw away their corsets during the 1920s. They didn’t need to make themselves some tiny waists and jutting bosoms, but anyone in possession of any kind of bosom or bottom needed to do the opposite and flatten them right out. So, elasticated corsets were created to do just that, and mould the body to the desired tube shape. Theses foundation garments also existed separately, so in 1920s fashion, a flattening bra and/or hip and bottom reducing girdle could be worn. Sometimes these were worn directly against bare skin, or sometimes on top of the traditional chemise, a loose fitting shift in cotton or silk used as a base to prevent chafing.

What type of hats did women wear in the 1920s? Headwear was a vital part of the fashionable woman’s outfit. There several styles seen, some styled almost like bonnets, while others were very close fitting, called Felt Helmets. Many hats were adorned with silk roses, ribbons, buckles, pins, feathers and more. Some had a ribbon loop on the side, others were velvet with gold lace trim. The style variations were endless.
The bohemian fashion style- always referred to commonly as the ‘boho’ look- can easily be described as a style that focuses mainly on wild and intricate patterns and exotic textures. They get most of their inspiration from gypsys and hippies, creating a standout finish with plenty of tie dye, geometrics, chains, fringes, and other eye-catching designs.
Undoubtedly it's harder to project our own identity onto a famous supermodel draped across a staircase, or align one’s own reality with the digitally enhanced, perceived perfection of a fashion shoot. An illustration is more translatable - it allows for a different daydream. And in a world where reality is often all too stark, and fashion can be somewhat daunting, it's not surprising that our artistic tastes are erring on the side of a little escapism.

As women’s style became more relaxed, there was more emphasis than ever before on sportswear and swimwear. We were still a long way off from the bikini here; a staple part of 1940s fashion, it wasn’t invented until 1946. But for the first time women could move freely and actually be active in their activewear, so all in all it was a pretty revolutionary decade.
Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…
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