As women’s style became more relaxed, there was more emphasis than ever before on sportswear and swimwear. We were still a long way off from the bikini here; a staple part of 1940s fashion, it wasn’t invented until 1946. But for the first time women could move freely and actually be active in their activewear, so all in all it was a pretty revolutionary decade.
As we’ve already seen the First World War brought many changes to the lives of women and by the time the roaring twenties were in full swing, women were enjoying the new found freedom they’d been giving due to the economic changes. They smoked and drank – they drove cars and how they dressed changed radically, from the more demure look of the Edwardian period, came the shorter hemlines of the early to mid-1920s.

Partial perms involve perming only the bottom half of your hair (or even just the very end if you choose) and leave the part of your hair nearest your scalp completely straight. This is a great way to add volume to your look without overdoing it and also tends to be a much manageable style than most other perms. If you’re going to be tying your hair up a lot this look is perfect for you.


Art is subjective. By extension, fashion illustration is subjective. What makes something “good” will depend on the project, client, designer, and viewer. The needs of one piece may not fulfill the needs of another. That said, however, I still like to ask the opinions of illustrators on what they think makes for good work or what they look for in their own work to find satisfaction. Below are some fantastic answers for what could make a good fashion illustration:
Basically for the ones who do not want to be dressed like a woman. They do not abide by the usual norms of what a woman should wear. To put it lightly, they prefer black over pink. Most of their clothing are a bit baggy and focuses more on graphic T-Shirts and Shirts from the boy’s selection. They do not prefer light colors and frills or laces. It can ask so be described as simple and modern. A boyish look is what they prefer over the classy, elegant looks.
A vibrant fashion style is reserved for the lady who wants to say “Hey, look at ME, world!” This energetic and intense fashion style typically features garments with wild patterns and exaggerated embroidery as well as asymmetrical designs and tons of colors. Most of her wardrobe will be lined with super light and pastel colors that draw the attention of everyone’s eyes, no matter where it’s worn.
Why you should follow: Marissa Cox not only writes Rue Rodier, she's also one of Who What Wear's columnists, so you know we really rate her style. The fashionable Brit moved to Paris in 2013 but had to change up her style to match her chic new city. As a result, she's got some brilliant learnings to dish out when it comes to dressing French. Merci, indeed. 

Other styles included, at the haute couture end, the “Infanta” dress. This was so-called because of its resemblance to dresses worn by Spanish Infantas in historical portraits. It was far more romantic than the chemise dress, consisting of a fitted bodice with a dropped waist, and flat, wide panniers to the hips. In length it usually was just below the knee. Versions of this included a similar bodice with a dropped waist but a flared full skirt instead of panniers, or fluted panels inserted into the skirt.

We toyed with it on Vogue.co.uk during my decade as editor of the site from 2005 to 2015, with a shoppable version of the Fashion Illustrated Gallery (founded by William Ling; stocking the work of all the prominent modern illustrators including Downton and Ling’s wife Tanya), running alongside an illustrated blog by Downton himself written from the Fumoir - but it didn’t get huge traction. In contrast, today illustration generates great engagement, even recently making it into the realms of the still-controversial space of branded content with a campaign of illustrated fashion fairytales that ran across Vogue, GQ and Tatler which surpassed all commercial targets for a month-long campaign within the first 24 hours.
Texture and Textile Types: Knowing how to illustrate different textile types goes hand-in-hand with understanding how clothing works. The viewer wants to know if a dress is made of silk or tweed. They are such different types of textiles that perhaps just the way they move over a figure may be enough. If, however, you’re trying to illustrate the difference between chiffon and organza, you’ll need to know how stiff or soft each fabric is, how textured it feels, whether it’s opaque or translucent, or which fabric is typically used for certain dress styles or occasions. Being able to communicate these details to the viewer without having to label them is a brilliant skill to have. Practice this by drawing swatches of fabric and studying various types as well as studying how other illustrators have tackled textures within their design work.

"It’s usually paper and pencil with some watercolors, but I like to vary the types of paper. Sometimes I’ll do only pencil with just a splash of watercolor, and others just watercolor. I’ve been trying to draw with just the brush and watercolor, which is much harder because you don’t have as much control as you do with the pencil, but the result can be very interesting at times!" — Camila Gray, fashion illustrator
Ling agrees. “Illustration has always been outside the contemporary art structure,” he says. “Some call it second rate and of course there is validity to that in some cases - but the art industry has long been a construct of vested interests so talent hasn’t always necessarily been able to get through. Now Instagram is democratising art, but it's also populist - and in that context people have had careers they wouldn't have otherwise had. But there is no doubt it’s working for the audience - people are certainly buying more and illustrators tend to work with designers on collaborations which photographers rarely do. There’s just an additional collectible appeal.”

As is common in these art career-focused articles, not all successful artists have a formal art education. Some of the artists I interviewed attended art schools, studying illustration or fine arts, or have taken art classes at some point. Others developed their skill set and work on their own or through years of working in various art and design related disciplines.


The Chriselle Factor on Youtube has close to 29 million views, and over half a million subscribers, which is why she is undeniably the biggest fashion blogger and expert there is. Even though she has been associated with big names in the fashion industry, she started the blog as a journal to share her personal style and musings, and she turned into a Youtube content creator to educate, share, and inspire women.
Bobs came in many styles and quite a few lengths. They could be cut slightly longer than jaw length, or as high as the cheekbones with a clipped back. They could be parted at the centre or the side or have no parting, they could have a fringe or none, or if they did the fringe could be many different heights over the forehead, wispy or strong, cut straight across, curved or even as a heart shape. They could also be curled or waved in many different ways.

Why: Since stumbling across this gorgeous blog, our lives have been so much more colourful. Jess goes beyond the standard #OOTD posts and her site’s a sartorial treasure trove full of styling advice, galleries and even some tips for budding bloggers if you’re thinking of making this list some day. Her masterfully saturated and unique photography is what sets her apart from the rest of the pack and we still can’t stop thinking about her guide to wearing colour this spring…
×