There were many rich Russian émigrés to Paris in the years preceding the 1920s, and their style greatly influenced the master couturiers. They favoured fur-trimmed clothing, and you’ll see that widely on 1920s garments, and not only outwear – there were fur edges on skirts and cardigan cuffs and collars as well as appearing on jackets, coats and hats. The popularity of a fur stole never waned and fox, mink, rabbit, Persian lamb and “foxine” (cheaper fur dyed and treated to look like fox) appear slung over shoulders or firmly grasped. Fake fur had yet to make an appearance in 1920s fashion

Colors for city folk were a bit on the drab side: black, navy, grey, tan, and olive green. Country folk and seaside dwellers liked color: white in summer, yellow, red, blue, and light grey year round. The difference between city and country clothing in Europe was far more pronounced than in America.  Americans loved to disobey fashion “rules” and wore whatever color they personally liked. Learn more about daytime 20s dresses here or shop daytime appropriate dresses online. 


And More… Really fashion illustration is almost any illustration whose focus is on fashion, accessories, and related media. Rather than telling a story about the illustration subject, fashion illustration tells stories about clothing, handbags, shoes, jewelry, and more. Almost anything that calls for illustrated work could contain fashion illustration, and specializing in this sort of design work makes for a broad range of client possibilities.
The hat is one accessory that women never left home without. There were hats for summer (woven straw, cotton) and winter (felt or hand sewn cloche hats). Hat trends included the tricorn when the Three Musketeers movie was popular, turban for fancy afternoons and evenings, the beret for the young lady, and a wide brim sun hat for garden parties. The most iconic hat was the cloche, meaning “bell” because it was shaped with a round crown and a small brim. Women often had to tilt their head back to see clearly while wearing a cloche. Hats had less decoration than they did in previous years but were still quite pretty with a bow, flower or art deco shape on one side.  Read more about women’s 1920s hats. 
But of course, women did not only wear dresses in 1920s fashion. They also favoured separates – skirts and a blouse, surmounted with a gently tailored jacket, long line or quite often a thick cardigan. The blouses ran the gamut from very simple to be-frilled, embroidered and with all kinds of fancy collars. They also, like dresses, came in many colours and prints.
Musicians and college kids often wore wide striped blazers over white pants as a summer outfit. This look was popularized by Barber Shop quartet singers, ragtime pianists, and traveling salesmen (aka The Music Man.) Some costumes skip the blazer and wear a striped vest, bow tie and armbands/sleeve garters instead. A straw boater hat completes the festive summer outfit.
“Each girl’s wardrobe should contain an extra dress or two which can be worn to meals. At breakfast and lunch, the girls will of necessity wear the dresses they wear to class. At dinner time they should change into something different. They will find themselves fresher in appearance and will be more sociable if they take time to change clothes before the evening meal.” (Textiles and Clothing / by Elizabeth Sage.)
We are eternally grateful to Mademoiselle Coco Chanel for so many definitive 1920s fashion styles, and some of the greatest sartorial inventions; the little black dress, skirt suit, costume jewellery, espadrilles… But her greatest, most overarching influence? The liberation of women’s clothing and the concept of casual chic in the 1920s. Chanel led the trend for a flatter, corset-free bust, a streamlined silhouette with no hyper-waistline and she popularised trousers for women. Next time you let it all hang out after a huge dinner, you can thank this woman.
Everything about Tami Reed is fascinating. Her personality, aura, wit and humor, fashion sense and everything else that caught the attention of big brands in no time. She had a substantial social media presence even before she turned into a fashion blogger. Tami wanted to do something concrete, and that’s how it all started. From being a red-carpet consultant to an entrepreneur, Tami Reed is a go-getter! For more inspiration and to stay updated with everything big happening in Hollywood or otherwise when it comes to fashion, check her blog.
Fashion blogs have been around since the early 2000s, but today, blogging is a whole new ball game. While fashion blogs are at an all-time high, we can’t argue against the fact that social media platforms like Instagram remain the single largest forum to redirect traffic towards fashion blogs. But we are not complaining, because that’s made our lives twice as easy. It’s a hashtag game out there, and that’s how we are neck deep into people’s profiles – engrossed, enamored, and even losing a few days while browsing one hashtag after another. Sometimes it can be overwhelming too, to see every second influencer with thousands of followers (and sometimes millions) and the stuff they have to offer. But some fashion bloggers manage to stand out despite all of it. And we are going to talk about them today. If fashion and being updated is your thing, you need to follow them! Check the list, below!
Patchwork is no longer just a craft that your grandma enjoys. It’s also one of fashion’s latest trends. Spotted on the streets outside fashion shows from Paris to New York, patchwork appeared on dresses, jumpsuits, pants and more. As colourful as it is creative, the look sews together contrasting pieces of fabric to achieve an eclectic and eye-catching design. To rock the look yourself, allow your patchwork piece to be the focus of your outfit by teaming it with simple, block-coloured garments and accessories.
If there is one thing that is constant, it is “change”. And change is exactly the one thing that is constant when it comes to fashion. Since the beginning of human civilization, there has been a constant effort being put to make one look better. The different styles in fashion have always gone through innumerable changes. With the increase in the amount of innovations, the change in trend and fashion styles have also been rapid. So keeping that in mind, here is the list of a few fashion styles that we accepted with all our hearts:
"I get requests from potential clients via email asking if I'm available and explaining what they would need me to do. I then draft and send them an estimate for them to sign. I first do a rough sketch, take a picture of it to send to the client for validation. Once it's been okayed, I finish it in black and white and if needed, I add color later using pencils as well.

If you’re one of the millions of women who love wearing their hair in curls, you’ll know how much of a hassle it is too though. How many seemingly endless hours do you spend a week trying to achieve the perfect curls? How often have you found yourself wanting to throw your curlers in the trash? Curling your hair is a nightmare – fact. The solution? If you curl your hair near daily anyway and know that’s not likely to change any time soon, why not get a perm? Your curls will last for months (the tighter the curls the longer the perm) so you’ll have no more daily hassle with curlers. Your hair will look great and you’ll save yourself heaps of precious time! Win, win!
Once she arrived at her beachside destination, casual comfort was of the utmost importance. White or navy dresses with a nautical or sailor theme were what all classes would wear. Upper classes in the late 1920s began wearing a pants ensemble called beach pajamas. They were inspired by Asian prints with wide legs and a kimono style top or jacket. They were one of the few times women could wear pants. Read about the other types of women’s pants here. 

Volumising perms add volume – it really is that simple. You can get them in a variety of curl styles but as a rule they tend to use quite tight curls to create extra volume. Plus, there tends to be lots of small curls opposed to a few loose big ones which adds even more volume. It’s not the easiest style in the world to manage but it is a look that is sure to get you noticed.
A very chic and youthful looking hat could be close-fitting with a fashionable pieced crown pulled softly to the back. The narrow off-the-face brim was finished with rows of stitching. The smart ostrich fancy on the side was of two shades and finished with grosgrain ribbon. Other styles might feature a high crown fashioned of velvet with an off-the-face flange that was outlined with dainty plush flowers. The band and flange facing was made of silk satin.
Women had always been included in sports like horse-riding, tennis, skiing, and golfing, but up till now they did it wearing every day dress, with little modification. In the 1920s every day dress had become a little more practical, and in addition things like jodphers for skiing or flared skirts for playing tennis in were suggested. Swimwear in 1920s fashion became far more body conscious and practical, with knitted wool swimsuits looking a lot like today’s one pieces.
From the beginning of the century, modern art shocked the world: cubism, fauvism, futurism, constructivism and the Weiner Werkstatte suggested a different kind of aesthetics that was radically simplified which not only affected pictures on walls but fashion, too. A lot of modern artists worked with fashion houses to design clothes and some, such as the Futurists, directly mentioned clothing in their manifestos. This had quite an influence of female dress, which moved towards a straighter, less complicated silhouette.

A woman’s most common social activity was having tea with friends (or a lunch for businessmen). Tea parties could be semi-formal or formal. A tea dress was an afternoon dress made of lighter, brighter materials and more trim. The afternoon dress was a thing of sophisticated beauty. White dresses worn in summer were very attractive while pastels or rich jewel tones offered variety in the other seasons.


Susie Lau's Style Bubble has been going for over a decade and includes intelligent articles on everything from underground global fashion talent to perfume. She also provides fascinating behind-the-scenes pieces on the real work it takes to create a beautiful Chanel garment. Then there's the tongue-in-cheek Man Repeller run by Leandra Medine and her team. Its smart, witty take on fashion is refreshing. And if over-the-top clothes aren't your thing, we've also found plenty of bloggers with more pared-back styles for the minimalists. 
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