Fashion Illustration is the art of communicating fashion ideas in a visual form that originates with illustration, drawing and painting and also known as Fashion sketching. It is mainly used by fashion designers to brainstorm their ideas on to paper or computer, using digital software like Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, which helps them to communicate easily with their team. Fashion sketching plays a major role in designing to preview and visualize designers thoughts and make decisions before going to actual clothing to reduce any wastage.[1]
All in all the twenties were a popular time of increasing awareness of women’s rights, a more liberal attitude to fashion that stayed, with shorter knee length hemlines staying in vogue. It was a period that embraced a period of peace after one of the worst wars Great Britain had seen so far. The car became more popular, entertainment included going to the movies, radios were starting to make an appearance and some women had been given the vote.

Eyes: A dark and dramatic look, with black smeared eyeliner liberally and heavily applied, topped with dark grey, green or turquoise eyeshadow to get the “smokey eyes” look. Emphasis lay in the middle of the eye to get a perfect round shape. White or off-white eyeliner inside the eye to enlarge optimally. Lots and lots of mascara! In those days mascara came in a block form and needed to be heated up and applied with a stick or wand. False eyelashes were popular!
A tailored dress made of a silk blend crepe or wool was also appropriate. These dresses featured a natural waist sash in the early 20s that gradually moved down into a drop waist with a thin belt. Dresses fit loose and usually slipped on overhead. A small collar or wide open flat collar with a bow tie at the neck was essential to the 20s wardrobe. Details were added to the dress that elongated the body such as vertical pintucks, a row of buttons, and pleated skirts.
Ultra Violet may be the Pantone Colour of the Year for 2018, but street style stars preferred a softer take on the trend this season. Rocking a range of shades from the lavender family, fashionistas proved that light purple is seriously stylish. Whether worn in the form of boots, dresses, coats or even head-to-toe ensembles, the flattering and feminine colour added a lovely touch to looks. Try it for yourself if you’re after something subtle yet exciting.
(Above) Even working at a silk mill, young women took the time to stay on the fashion trend. Here a worker in 1924 has the latest bobbed haircut and what appears to be a canton silk (silk and cotton) blend dress with embroidered waistband. The working girl on the left is wearing a gingham print cotton house dress with white collar and black leather belt.
A very chic and youthful looking hat could be close-fitting with a fashionable pieced crown pulled softly to the back. The narrow off-the-face brim was finished with rows of stitching. The smart ostrich fancy on the side was of two shades and finished with grosgrain ribbon. Other styles might feature a high crown fashioned of velvet with an off-the-face flange that was outlined with dainty plush flowers. The band and flange facing was made of silk satin.
One of the most adorable fashion styles, it definitely is a blast from the past. From flapper dresses to pinup clothing and from retro swimwear to indie clothing, the vintage look is a culmination of fashion from the 20’s to the 70’s. It is the one trend that overcame the test of time. Look these celebrities who are feature for their vintage style.
(Above) Even working at a silk mill, young women took the time to stay on the fashion trend. Here a worker in 1924 has the latest bobbed haircut and what appears to be a canton silk (silk and cotton) blend dress with embroidered waistband. The working girl on the left is wearing a gingham print cotton house dress with white collar and black leather belt.
Patchwork is no longer just a craft that your grandma enjoys. It’s also one of fashion’s latest trends. Spotted on the streets outside fashion shows from Paris to New York, patchwork appeared on dresses, jumpsuits, pants and more. As colourful as it is creative, the look sews together contrasting pieces of fabric to achieve an eclectic and eye-catching design. To rock the look yourself, allow your patchwork piece to be the focus of your outfit by teaming it with simple, block-coloured garments and accessories.
Leopard wasn’t the only popular print for the Spring/Summer ’19 show season. Tartan also appeared on the streets of New York, London, Paris and Milan. Of course, in true fashion week style, the traditional print wasn’t worn subtly. It was donned all over in eye-catching colours by the fashion pack. Want to try the look for yourself? Pick up a tartan suit, jacket or pair of pants that features the classic pattern in unique and bold colours, such as red, blue, green and yellow.
College men wore looser suits, often without jackets- just a pair of pants, shirt, tie, belt and maybe a vest. Hats were optional as well. Raccoon coats were not. Whatever the trendy fashion of the year was college kids had to wear it. They also had to wear college colors in a scarf, a pocket square, bag, hat band, pin or ring.  School spirit was vital to the dress code.

The bohemian fashion style- always referred to commonly as the ‘boho’ look- can easily be described as a style that focuses mainly on wild and intricate patterns and exotic textures. They get most of their inspiration from gypsys and hippies, creating a standout finish with plenty of tie dye, geometrics, chains, fringes, and other eye-catching designs.


All in all the twenties were a popular time of increasing awareness of women’s rights, a more liberal attitude to fashion that stayed, with shorter knee length hemlines staying in vogue. It was a period that embraced a period of peace after one of the worst wars Great Britain had seen so far. The car became more popular, entertainment included going to the movies, radios were starting to make an appearance and some women had been given the vote.
Susie Lau's Style Bubble has been going for over a decade and includes intelligent articles on everything from underground global fashion talent to perfume. She also provides fascinating behind-the-scenes pieces on the real work it takes to create a beautiful Chanel garment. Then there's the tongue-in-cheek Man Repeller run by Leandra Medine and her team. Its smart, witty take on fashion is refreshing. And if over-the-top clothes aren't your thing, we've also found plenty of bloggers with more pared-back styles for the minimalists. 
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