There were many rich Russian émigrés to Paris in the years preceding the 1920s, and their style greatly influenced the master couturiers. They favoured fur-trimmed clothing, and you’ll see that widely on 1920s garments, and not only outwear – there were fur edges on skirts and cardigan cuffs and collars as well as appearing on jackets, coats and hats. The popularity of a fur stole never waned and fox, mink, rabbit, Persian lamb and “foxine” (cheaper fur dyed and treated to look like fox) appear slung over shoulders or firmly grasped. Fake fur had yet to make an appearance in 1920s fashion

Also – I’m getting the impression from surfing around that ladies (flappers) did not carry purses but only little make-up bags. i’ve been wondering whether this is just for evenings out (when their escort would be expected to have bulky things like cash ) and whether bigger handbags were used during the day. .[I pretty sure I’ve seen Margaret with a bag on Boardwalk Empire….]
“Photography has long been considered superior to illustration when it comes to selling magazines” says Downton. “But it’s like asking what an apple can do that a banana can’t. I think they have a symbiotic relationship. Illustration changes the pace of a magazine as you read it; and you project your own finish onto the story which gives a different sense of satisfaction to the reader.”
This entry was posted on April 2, 2013 at 9:36 pm and is filed under Make Up - Savage Beauty, Savage Beauty Photography with tags 1920's Fashion, Amanda Martinez, Independent Kostym, Mattias Savage Wilmenius graphics, Min Boudoir, Savage Beauty Make Up, Savage Beauty Photography, Tallee Savage Photography, Tifa Högberg, Vintage fashion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.
Josephine Baker is the woman who inspired Beyonce’s booty-shake. How cool is that? The original showgirl was famous for her ‘banana dance’, plus she was a spy and she owned a pet cheetah, which she used to walk in Paris. A queen of accessorising, the Jazz Age beauty sometimes wore little else on stage, and by day she worked an Art Deco print like no other.
"Getting exposure is not always easy, we are in a competitive industry, so you should build up a solid web presence. I consider having a clean, eye candy and updated professional life online is very important to get your work seen: website, blog, social networks, specialized sites such as Behance, or maybe a newsletter. I found Instagram the best social tool for fashion illustrators" — Cristina Alonso

Specific sports called for different types of clothing; however, there were two primary sets. The first set was worn by golfers, tennis players and other ladylike sports. It consisted of a long or tea length skirt, long sleeve blouse and a loose-knit vest or sweater. A thin belt tied the waist in. A low heel Oxford or flat saddle shoes were best on grassy surfaces. It is a look not too different from the college style above.
Leandra Medine is an American author, fashion blogger, and a humor writer. The blog ‘Man Repeller’ is a quirky yet rooted and an honest place that talks about everything women love, and men hate – to quote her. She has an exceptional ability to blend high-street fashion and giving it a comedic aesthetic to prove her life’s motto that you don’t have to take everything seriously. That’s how she came about the idea of starting this blog with a bunch of others that align with her ideas. It is a blog that is about more than just one woman sharing her personal style, but rather a team ringing in millions of monthly views. Check the blog, and you’d know what we are talking about.
The Western World was seized with Egyptomania when King Tutankhamun’s tomb was discovered in 1922. The Egyptian King appeared to be dressed in pure gold sequins and had nets of faience beads spread over him. Immediately sequins and beading became all the rage, as well as Ancient Egyptian style emblems and pictograms (which often didn’t make sense). Even 1920s fashion illustrations were influenced, with models appearing in profile drawn in a flat style with a distinct black outline.
If you’re one of the millions of women who love wearing their hair in curls, you’ll know how much of a hassle it is too though. How many seemingly endless hours do you spend a week trying to achieve the perfect curls? How often have you found yourself wanting to throw your curlers in the trash? Curling your hair is a nightmare – fact. The solution? If you curl your hair near daily anyway and know that’s not likely to change any time soon, why not get a perm? Your curls will last for months (the tighter the curls the longer the perm) so you’ll have no more daily hassle with curlers. Your hair will look great and you’ll save yourself heaps of precious time! Win, win!
Tiaras and diamond hair slides were also popular. They were designed to draw attention to the daring hairstyle. Shoes usually sported a kitten heel, nothing higher. For jewellery, as well as the hair decorations mentioned above, slave bangles, positioned above the elbow accentuated the bare arm, and a collection of bangles at the wrist also looked good. As well as this, ropes of pearls had been made fashionable by Chanel and dangly earrings were still in vogue.
“Photography has long been considered superior to illustration when it comes to selling magazines” says Downton. “But it’s like asking what an apple can do that a banana can’t. I think they have a symbiotic relationship. Illustration changes the pace of a magazine as you read it; and you project your own finish onto the story which gives a different sense of satisfaction to the reader.”
A romantic silhouette with full skirt and high waist was still in fashion in the roaring twenties, but the period was increasingly seen as the period of the knee length straight dress. Sport clothes had an impact on fashion too, as more women as well as men took part in outdoor sports. Cloche hats, dropped hems, and bobbed hair were all the rage with dancing too, the Charleston and Black Bottom were fashionable dances of the time. Party dresses were often adorned with rhinestones or real diamonds, shimmering fringes, tiaras and bandeaus. Knitwear for day-wear became popular with cardigans and tunics being the thing to be seen in.
Partial perms involve perming only the bottom half of your hair (or even just the very end if you choose) and leave the part of your hair nearest your scalp completely straight. This is a great way to add volume to your look without overdoing it and also tends to be a much manageable style than most other perms. If you’re going to be tying your hair up a lot this look is perfect for you.

Although bodies may have seemed slimmer during the 1920s era, this was an illusion as most women dressed to flatten their bodies – the kind of underwear we wear today was unheard of in the twenties. The corselette offered a whole new way of shaping the body, and unlike the corsets that had gone before, in the Edwardian period, the corselette didn’t press the waist in or lift the bust, but flattened the chest and held in the hips.
Of course, the roaring twenties were the decade of the flapper girl, so restrictive corsets and a womanly shape were out. Which was great for the naturally flat chested – no underwear, hurrah! But if you happened to be endowed with any kind of bosom, in order to fit the sleek styles, you needed to go the other way and actually bind your chest into a flat silhouette.
Why you should follow: Marissa Cox not only writes Rue Rodier, she's also one of Who What Wear's columnists, so you know we really rate her style. The fashionable Brit moved to Paris in 2013 but had to change up her style to match her chic new city. As a result, she's got some brilliant learnings to dish out when it comes to dressing French. Merci, indeed. 
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