The 1920s fashion is my favorite era in so many ways. I love the beautiful materials like; feathers, lace and pearls and the whole assertive attitude that came with the young women of the time. Fashion was celebrating youth after some dark years during the first world war. The attitude to make-up also made a dramatic and revolutionary change. Before this, it just wasn’t “proper” for girls to wear make up. Sales from make up multiplied in Paris, London and the U.S.A and reached ladies from all societies. Harmful chemicals like lead and mercury were removed. Leading innovators were Max Factor,  Maybelline, Elisabeth Arden and Helena Rubinstein.
The Chriselle Factor on Youtube has close to 29 million views, and over half a million subscribers, which is why she is undeniably the biggest fashion blogger and expert there is. Even though she has been associated with big names in the fashion industry, she started the blog as a journal to share her personal style and musings, and she turned into a Youtube content creator to educate, share, and inspire women.
Everything about Tami Reed is fascinating. Her personality, aura, wit and humor, fashion sense and everything else that caught the attention of big brands in no time. She had a substantial social media presence even before she turned into a fashion blogger. Tami wanted to do something concrete, and that’s how it all started. From being a red-carpet consultant to an entrepreneur, Tami Reed is a go-getter! For more inspiration and to stay updated with everything big happening in Hollywood or otherwise when it comes to fashion, check her blog.
Fashion Illustration is the art of communicating fashion ideas in a visual form that originates with illustration, drawing and painting and also known as Fashion sketching. It is mainly used by fashion designers to brainstorm their ideas on to paper or computer, using digital software like Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, which helps them to communicate easily with their team. Fashion sketching plays a major role in designing to preview and visualize designers thoughts and make decisions before going to actual clothing to reduce any wastage.[1]
Partial perms involve perming only the bottom half of your hair (or even just the very end if you choose) and leave the part of your hair nearest your scalp completely straight. This is a great way to add volume to your look without overdoing it and also tends to be a much manageable style than most other perms. If you’re going to be tying your hair up a lot this look is perfect for you.
Consider the illustrations that still appear on sewing patterns today. While many companies that manufacture sewing patterns have turned to actual photographs of the craft product itself, many of them stick to the age-old style of drawings and paintings showing the pattern designs in completed form on imaginary models. Companies like Simplicity and McCall’s still use fashion illustration on their products, as well as continuing to produce vintage patterns whose packaging design styles have inspired fashion illustrators for decades.
The 1920s fashion is my favorite era in so many ways. I love the beautiful materials like; feathers, lace and pearls and the whole assertive attitude that came with the young women of the time. Fashion was celebrating youth after some dark years during the first world war. The attitude to make-up also made a dramatic and revolutionary change. Before this, it just wasn’t “proper” for girls to wear make up. Sales from make up multiplied in Paris, London and the U.S.A and reached ladies from all societies. Harmful chemicals like lead and mercury were removed. Leading innovators were Max Factor,  Maybelline, Elisabeth Arden and Helena Rubinstein.

As is common in these art career-focused articles, not all successful artists have a formal art education. Some of the artists I interviewed attended art schools, studying illustration or fine arts, or have taken art classes at some point. Others developed their skill set and work on their own or through years of working in various art and design related disciplines.
As is common in these art career-focused articles, not all successful artists have a formal art education. Some of the artists I interviewed attended art schools, studying illustration or fine arts, or have taken art classes at some point. Others developed their skill set and work on their own or through years of working in various art and design related disciplines.
While women’s hats varied greatly in style, men’s hats were the opposite. For the most part, men wore black, blue or some shade of brown. Their hats were typically made of felt and were the same collegiate style you see in every 1920s period movie you’ve ever seen. If it wasn’t a fedora-style hat, then it was a wool, snap-front newsboy hat. This lack of variety makes sense; it was not common for men at the time to be wildly flamboyant.

Savage Beauty, Independent Kostym and Min Boudoir Magazine did a collaboration that covered the look of the 1920’s until the 1950’s. It was published a few months back in “Min Boudoir # 5”. If you are interested in the retro, burlesque, vintage fashion and lifestyle of this era, this is a good magazine to pick up. I did all the make up and shot all the photos for this project. My sister Amanda Martinez was in charge of the costume styling to get the perfect and accurate look of the decade. Here is the english and un-edited version, showing more pictures from our project. Next week we will cover the 1930’s!


Fashion illustrators, also known as fashion design artists, are specialized illustrators who focus on expressing fashion designs and ideas through art. They must be familiar with computer design software and usually hold bachelor's degrees in graphic design or a relevant field. Fashion illustrators can work for many types of employers, including publications and fashion manufacturers. Many are freelancers and work on contract.
Surprisingly, wearing Sunday’s best was not part of the ’20s culture unless a woman was poor and only had one nice outfit– then, certainly, she MUST wear that to church. Otherwise, whatever she wore for streetwear she also wore to church as long as it was modest with long sleeves and a below the knee hemline. If a sleeveless dress was worn a light shawl, wrap or jacket acted as a light coverup. Simple, non-distracting clothing was appreciated in church. Women were required to wear a hat, gloves and matching purse. These three accessories polished her look and gave her permission to add personality to an otherwise conservative dress. Shop 20s dresses. 
Proving once and for all that the minimal trend is over, this show season saw attendees embrace lashings of fabric. While this meant bold ruffles and oversized silhouettes, it also resulted in statement puff shoulders on both dresses and blouses. Simultaneously striking and stylish, these puff sleeves added a fun ‘80s twist to modern outfits. Try the look yourself if you’re after a powerful and fashionable daytime style. Just be sure to keep the rest of your look subdued, so you don’t appear over-the-top.

"I work with both traditional and digital media, however the biggest job is done with the use pencils of varying lead hardness ranging from 8B to H. I'm constantly learning how to master smooth shading useful for realistic drawings and that's why working with pencils comes in handy in this case. Each drawing is scanned and edited a bit in Photoshop, which I find very useful to clean up the composition, adjust the contrast and work with the colors." — Ewelina Dymek, illustrator

Women had always been included in sports like horse-riding, tennis, skiing, and golfing, but up till now they did it wearing every day dress, with little modification. In the 1920s every day dress had become a little more practical, and in addition things like jodphers for skiing or flared skirts for playing tennis in were suggested. Swimwear in 1920s fashion became far more body conscious and practical, with knitted wool swimsuits looking a lot like today’s one pieces.
Why: Kavita’s been blogging for several years now and it’s been amazing to watch her star rise, from her #OOTD shots as a sixteen year old through to a Coachella VIP frolicking with celebrities. Her bold colourful looks are a great blend of both high street and luxury, though she’s got a soft spot for a Gucci bag – a girl after our own heart, basically.
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