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While women’s hats varied greatly in style, men’s hats were the opposite. For the most part, men wore black, blue or some shade of brown. Their hats were typically made of felt and were the same collegiate style you see in every 1920s period movie you’ve ever seen. If it wasn’t a fedora-style hat, then it was a wool, snap-front newsboy hat. This lack of variety makes sense; it was not common for men at the time to be wildly flamboyant.

(Above) Even working at a silk mill, young women took the time to stay on the fashion trend. Here a worker in 1924 has the latest bobbed haircut and what appears to be a canton silk (silk and cotton) blend dress with embroidered waistband. The working girl on the left is wearing a gingham print cotton house dress with white collar and black leather belt.
It covers many aspects of men's fashion, from Menswear 101 to Outfit of the Day to Dressiquette. For instance, there are fascinating articles entitled “Braces or Belt, Never Both,” “Match Leather to Leather and Metal to Metal,” and “Dressiquette – Your socks should match your pants.” (Although your socks should match your pants, not your shoes, Sergio believes you only need to worry about this in formal situations – he prefers high-contrast brightly colored socks).
Paris was still the centre of fashion in the 1920s. If a dress didn’t come from Paris or wasn’t a copy of something that came from Paris, it simply wasn’t fashionable. But the good news: Paris was really into the simplified silhouette. So simplified that “sack” was a word regularly interchanged for “dress” – some frocks consisted literally of only two pieces, front and back with arm and neck holes. This could easily be made on the mass market or even by the home sewer. Sewing machines were becoming more affordable and most middle class households had them by now. A dress as simple as this could even be hand sewn fairly quickly and easily. It meant that 1920s fashion could be followed by the middle and working classes – quite a revolution.
"I work with both traditional and digital media, however the biggest job is done with the use pencils of varying lead hardness ranging from 8B to H. I'm constantly learning how to master smooth shading useful for realistic drawings and that's why working with pencils comes in handy in this case. Each drawing is scanned and edited a bit in Photoshop, which I find very useful to clean up the composition, adjust the contrast and work with the colors." — Ewelina Dymek, illustrator

Fashion illustrators, also known as fashion design artists, are specialized illustrators who focus on expressing fashion designs and ideas through art. They must be familiar with computer design software and usually hold bachelor's degrees in graphic design or a relevant field. Fashion illustrators can work for many types of employers, including publications and fashion manufacturers. Many are freelancers and work on contract.

The best fashion blogs don't just give you incredible style advice—they give you inspiration. Fashion blogs engage you in interesting content and provide new ideas on the subject of fashion and the surrounding creative world. Sure, everyone wants great outfit ideas for their saved Instagram section and dream wardrobes, but fashion isn't just about looking perfect. It can be an expression of who you are and how you want to represent yourself in the world. Now, if that's a little too deep for you, fear not. Our roundup of the best fashion blogs is a mix of serious and lighthearted takes on style.
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