Certain occupations required men to wear formal clothing. Waiters, bartenders, butlers, hotel managers, and other service-oriented careers required men to dress in their finest formal attire. A lower class establishment, such as a neighborhood bar, would see staff dressed in a button-down shirt with sleeves rolled up to the elbow or help down with sleeve garters. Bankers often wore sleeve garters, too.
“Each girl’s wardrobe should contain an extra dress or two which can be worn to meals. At breakfast and lunch, the girls will of necessity wear the dresses they wear to class. At dinner time they should change into something different. They will find themselves fresher in appearance and will be more sociable if they take time to change clothes before the evening meal.” (Textiles and Clothing / by Elizabeth Sage.)
Some illustrators are hired for full-time, permanent positions, but many operate as independent freelancers who work on short-term contracts. An understanding of business concepts and a strong network of contacts can help fashion illustrators manage their freelance business and find work. To stand out in this field, illustrators need to polish their skills and develop a personal style.
I feel like there’s a lot of love in the vintage community for 20s style, but there’s a much higher barrier of entry to it than there is to, say, 1950s style. For starters, there’s just way less of it. A dress from 1926 would be 90 years old this year. Pieces from that decade are out there, but they’re rare, they’re fragile, and they’re really expensive, particularly if they’re in a really wearable condition. On top of that, the 20s never really came back the way that other decades have. You can find 30s inspired looks from the 90s, and 40s and 50s inspired styles from the 80s, but there wasn’t really a point where people were like “let’s dress like it’s the 20s again!” in a widespread way. Certain details popped up in other eras – beading, fringing, dropped waists – but, at least in my experience, it’s unusual to come across a dress from a later era that truly feels like a 20s piece.
There are many quality fashion blogs, which unsurprisingly feature high-quality photographs of the latest fashion innovations.  Most fashion blogs are full of inspiration for those mornings you open your wardrobe door with your mind in a blank. They make an ideal place to begin your online research into what’s hot this year before you head off to purchase your own outfits. They can also provide you with ideas about what you can mix and match to create that perfect look.
As women’s style became more relaxed, there was more emphasis than ever before on sportswear and swimwear. We were still a long way off from the bikini here; a staple part of 1940s fashion, it wasn’t invented until 1946. But for the first time women could move freely and actually be active in their activewear, so all in all it was a pretty revolutionary decade.
Ankle boots were still worn for practicality, as were sensible lace ups but the most fashionable shoes were kitten heeled t-bars or strap shoes (very useful for dancing) or low heeled court shoes. Fancy designs could come with several straps, and bows, buckles or artificial flowers were attached at the toe for decoration. The toe shape was predominantly pointed.
Preparing for the 2020 Great Gatsby event with a 1920s tennis outfit theme begins now! I have always wanted to do this theme and Oscar picked up some tennis sweaters and vests earlier this year so we are almost all set. Our friends are joining us for a group costume-along which always makes it more … Read More about 1920s Tennis Clothes | Womens and Men’s Outfits
Eyes: A dark and dramatic look, with black smeared eyeliner liberally and heavily applied, topped with dark grey, green or turquoise eyeshadow to get the “smokey eyes” look. Emphasis lay in the middle of the eye to get a perfect round shape. White or off-white eyeliner inside the eye to enlarge optimally. Lots and lots of mascara! In those days mascara came in a block form and needed to be heated up and applied with a stick or wand. False eyelashes were popular!

Tom Ford, counted among the most famous designers today, whose portfolio includes serving as a creative director for both Yves Saint Laurent and Gucci, wanted to be actor when he was growing up. He was born in Texas and even took training to be an actor. But fate had other “designs” for him. Tom ford popularity as a designer reached peaks when in the year 2000, he was declared the winner of the Best International Designer Award.
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Patchwork is no longer just a craft that your grandma enjoys. It’s also one of fashion’s latest trends. Spotted on the streets outside fashion shows from Paris to New York, patchwork appeared on dresses, jumpsuits, pants and more. As colourful as it is creative, the look sews together contrasting pieces of fabric to achieve an eclectic and eye-catching design. To rock the look yourself, allow your patchwork piece to be the focus of your outfit by teaming it with simple, block-coloured garments and accessories.
Traveling in the 1920s was a dirty affair. Cars were dusty, trains were hot and buses were so packed with people that people were bound to be a wrinkled mess by the time they arrived at their destination. For those reasons, 1920s traveling clothes, for both men and women, were simple suits, a sturdy overcoat, comfortable hat, leather gloves, leather purse or luggage, and low profile shoes. Colors were drab grey, brown and blue that showed the least amount of dirt possible. Materials that wrinkled, like linen and cotton, were avoided, and instead knit, wool or sturdy cotton blends were preferred.
A romantic silhouette with full skirt and high waist was still in fashion in the roaring twenties, but the period was increasingly seen as the period of the knee length straight dress. Sport clothes had an impact on fashion too, as more women as well as men took part in outdoor sports. Cloche hats, dropped hems, and bobbed hair were all the rage with dancing too, the Charleston and Black Bottom were fashionable dances of the time. Party dresses were often adorned with rhinestones or real diamonds, shimmering fringes, tiaras and bandeaus. Knitwear for day-wear became popular with cardigans and tunics being the thing to be seen in.
Not everyone was a bright young thing in the 1920s, nor did they want to wear the latest fashion of drop waist dresses. Many mature women continued to wear the fashions of 10 years prior to the 1920s. This meant long, modest gowns, in dark rich fabrics. Tall lace up boots or strappy heels were more comfortable for women who grew up wearing them.  Hats were larger as well, not the helmet cloches of the roaring twenties.

So embrace the the roaring Twenties and the liberation of movement that it brought – bring out your hats, your buckles and bows and rhinestones. The straight shift dress can still make such a dramatic statement. Either vintage or homemade, if it’s plain then depending on how good with a sewing machine you are, embellish with rhinestones and fringes.

And More… Really fashion illustration is almost any illustration whose focus is on fashion, accessories, and related media. Rather than telling a story about the illustration subject, fashion illustration tells stories about clothing, handbags, shoes, jewelry, and more. Almost anything that calls for illustrated work could contain fashion illustration, and specializing in this sort of design work makes for a broad range of client possibilities.
Lynn Slater started the ‘Accidental Icon’ because of the dearth of fashion blogs catering to the needs of women over 50s, 60s and beyond. You won’t find too many people like her, but you know the world needs more of that. With snow-white coiffed hair, this sixty-something grandmother is living it all up and raising bars, more like breaking barriers for all the right reasons. With floral kimonos, flaming hot oversized sunglasses, and a contagious fashion sense, Lyn Slater believes and shows us time and again that ‘age is just a variable.’ Thanks for proving the world wrong, Lyn, your 400,000 and growing fan club couldn’t be more grateful.
"Among many others, I’ve worked with luxury brands such as Analeena; magazines and publishing houses such as Washingtonian Magazine, Penguin Random House, Anaya Multimedia and Montena; or brands such as Oysho (Inditex), Delush Polish, AdelitaAdelita, etc. My work has also been presented at the GBK Luxury Gift Lounge in the New York Fashion Week 2014." — Cristina Alonso, fashion illustrator
The Parisian fashion blogger and DIY queen Lisa Gachet started blogging a few years ago, and recently launched a brand that represents something she truly believes in – Do It Yourself Fashion. It’s a fascinating concept of making limited edition clothing that is a reflection of your personality, but affordable. Her brand is unique, and her feed is colorful. Follow her for all of it, and more.
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