"If one door closes, another opens – don't be discouraged by a commission which falls through because there are plenty other opportunities waiting for you. If you already exchanged some emails with a client, there's still a chance that he'll remember about you the next time and/or will recommend you to other potential clients. Take it as a lesson of enduring such situation humbly." — Ewelina Dymek
Preppy girls, often named simply ‘preps’, love to rock a college-inspired wardrobe. Their hangers are lined side to side with girly blouses with matching collared tees as well as a-line skirts and tights. Her hair is almost always amped up with a cute little headband and she usually wears glasses- whether she really needs to or not! This style may appear geeky and slightly luxurious, but the look itself is really not expensive and extravagant at all.

A businessman wore an appropriate 3 piece suit to the office on business calls and often to dinners and parties, too. He was not subject to the multiple changes of clothing as women were. The type of suit changed with his seniority at work and the season. Some men in upper-level positions still wore men’s formal morning suits with cutaway coats, striped pants, cravat, and vests to work.


With top-tier fashion bloggers raking in multimillion-dollar campaigns, it’s no wonder every self-proclaimed fashionista wants to launch a personal style site. But not all outfit posts are created equal. These fashion bloggers stand out from the pack thanks to their one-of-a-kind sartorial sense and sharp business acumen. Click through the slideshow above to meet the dynamic women ruling the blogosphere and our picks for the best fashion blogs of 2019. May the best blog win.
There were many rich Russian émigrés to Paris in the years preceding the 1920s, and their style greatly influenced the master couturiers. They favoured fur-trimmed clothing, and you’ll see that widely on 1920s garments, and not only outwear – there were fur edges on skirts and cardigan cuffs and collars as well as appearing on jackets, coats and hats. The popularity of a fur stole never waned and fox, mink, rabbit, Persian lamb and “foxine” (cheaper fur dyed and treated to look like fox) appear slung over shoulders or firmly grasped. Fake fur had yet to make an appearance in 1920s fashion

"I get requests from potential clients via email asking if I'm available and explaining what they would need me to do. I then draft and send them an estimate for them to sign. I first do a rough sketch, take a picture of it to send to the client for validation. Once it's been okayed, I finish it in black and white and if needed, I add color later using pencils as well.
After the excitement of The Hammersmith Vintage Fair, I like to pop into a fine public house such as The Salutation, right opposite the fair, for a little liquid sustenance. 🍷 Am wearing a 1920s balloon sleeved corded velvet coat and my bag is a 20s/30s knitting holder. #hammersmithvintagefair #vintagefashion #truevintageootd #vintagecoat #1920scoat #vintagebag #kingstreet #hammersmith
The Parisian fashion blogger and DIY queen Lisa Gachet started blogging a few years ago, and recently launched a brand that represents something she truly believes in – Do It Yourself Fashion. It’s a fascinating concept of making limited edition clothing that is a reflection of your personality, but affordable. Her brand is unique, and her feed is colorful. Follow her for all of it, and more.
A picture tells a thousand stories and considering the noise that surrounds the launch of every issue of Vogue - endless hashtags and chatter about the cover model, photographer and pose, it seems inconceivable that covers in the past featured fashion illustrations elaborating far more detailed stories. The romance of images by John Ward and Carl Erickson, surrealism of Dali and Benito, and art deco of Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Georges Barbier and Harriet Meserole spun tales of arctic explorers; tennis players; bridal marches; world travellers; golfers; race drivers, actresses, mothers and lovers. In the days before photography became fashion’s key documenter, fashion illustration was just as emotive and colourful - if not more so - as the images burned onto our retinas more recently by Penn, Bailey, Day, Meisel and Mert & Marcus. Call to mind the images created by Rene Gruau as Dior’s artistic director in 1947 - there is no doubt as to the part illustration used to play in fashion storytelling.
In the summer, men’s felt hats were tossed aside in favor of lighter straw hats. The straw boater and skimmer are what most of us think of as men’s ’20s hats. They had a round flat crown and striped ribbon that often represented a gentlemen’s club or college colors. The lightweight straw Panama hat was expensive but much nicer than other thick straw boater hats.  By the end of summer, straw hats were in shambles and thrown away. Learn more about men’s hat styles. 

A woman’s most common social activity was having tea with friends (or a lunch for businessmen). Tea parties could be semi-formal or formal. A tea dress was an afternoon dress made of lighter, brighter materials and more trim. The afternoon dress was a thing of sophisticated beauty. White dresses worn in summer were very attractive while pastels or rich jewel tones offered variety in the other seasons.
Colors for city folk were a bit on the drab side: black, navy, grey, tan, and olive green. Country folk and seaside dwellers liked color: white in summer, yellow, red, blue, and light grey year round. The difference between city and country clothing in Europe was far more pronounced than in America.  Americans loved to disobey fashion “rules” and wore whatever color they personally liked. Learn more about daytime 20s dresses here or shop daytime appropriate dresses online. 
Evening dresses were made of fine materials like silk, chiffon, taffeta and light velvet. They were usually sleeveless for young women and long sleeves for older women. Dresses featured the iconic ’20s drop waist with layers or tiers of fabric creating some fullness from the waist down. Beaded dresses were the most glamorous and most expensive. Some had fringe or metal sequins, but this was quite rare. The short, fringed flapper dress is a ’20s myth. Real flappers wore knee-length or longer gowns that swished and swayed white dancing to jazz.
I feel like there’s a lot of love in the vintage community for 20s style, but there’s a much higher barrier of entry to it than there is to, say, 1950s style. For starters, there’s just way less of it. A dress from 1926 would be 90 years old this year. Pieces from that decade are out there, but they’re rare, they’re fragile, and they’re really expensive, particularly if they’re in a really wearable condition. On top of that, the 20s never really came back the way that other decades have. You can find 30s inspired looks from the 90s, and 40s and 50s inspired styles from the 80s, but there wasn’t really a point where people were like “let’s dress like it’s the 20s again!” in a widespread way. Certain details popped up in other eras – beading, fringing, dropped waists – but, at least in my experience, it’s unusual to come across a dress from a later era that truly feels like a 20s piece.
A career as a fashion illustrator typically requires a bachelor's degree in graphic design or a related field. Those interested in pursuing this career will need to build a portfolio to showcase their work to potential employers. Fashion illustrators use art to express fashion designs and ideas, and they may be employed by publications, studios, fashion designers or clothing manufacturers.
What type of hats did women wear in the 1920s? Headwear was a vital part of the fashionable woman’s outfit. There several styles seen, some styled almost like bonnets, while others were very close fitting, called Felt Helmets. Many hats were adorned with silk roses, ribbons, buckles, pins, feathers and more. Some had a ribbon loop on the side, others were velvet with gold lace trim. The style variations were endless.
Not everyone was a bright young thing in the 1920s, nor did they want to wear the latest fashion of drop waist dresses. Many mature women continued to wear the fashions of 10 years prior to the 1920s. This meant long, modest gowns, in dark rich fabrics. Tall lace up boots or strappy heels were more comfortable for women who grew up wearing them.  Hats were larger as well, not the helmet cloches of the roaring twenties.
As women’s style became more relaxed, there was more emphasis than ever before on sportswear and swimwear. We were still a long way off from the bikini here; a staple part of 1940s fashion, it wasn’t invented until 1946. But for the first time women could move freely and actually be active in their activewear, so all in all it was a pretty revolutionary decade.
As is common in these art career-focused articles, not all successful artists have a formal art education. Some of the artists I interviewed attended art schools, studying illustration or fine arts, or have taken art classes at some point. Others developed their skill set and work on their own or through years of working in various art and design related disciplines.
Simple Makeup Tutorial from 1960 Vintage 1960s makeup tips from Hollywood actress Sandra Dee. Her teacher at Universal is the great Bud Westmore. The secret says Sandra is to look natural Start with Nails So her hands look prettier and nails won’t split, Sandra Dee applies polish, in pale shades of pearl. Then she uses colorless sealer over all Foundation…
After World War I, the fashion landscape shifted like tectonic plates. Once reserved for aristocrats and the affluent, high fashion had taken a noticeably more attainable turn, allowing middle class men and women in on the fun. Some luxurious textiles were finally affordable, making it possible for fashionable items to be created at home. In the 1920s it was still quite common for clothes to be handmade.
Lynn Slater started the ‘Accidental Icon’ because of the dearth of fashion blogs catering to the needs of women over 50s, 60s and beyond. You won’t find too many people like her, but you know the world needs more of that. With snow-white coiffed hair, this sixty-something grandmother is living it all up and raising bars, more like breaking barriers for all the right reasons. With floral kimonos, flaming hot oversized sunglasses, and a contagious fashion sense, Lyn Slater believes and shows us time and again that ‘age is just a variable.’ Thanks for proving the world wrong, Lyn, your 400,000 and growing fan club couldn’t be more grateful.
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